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  1. ANAMORPHIC

    The largest online community devoted to anamorphic filmmaking.
    Discuss lenses, adapters, workflows and post lenses for sale

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    Raw shooting cameras - URSA Mini 4.6K, BMCC, BMPCC and more

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    Screening room and the creative side of filmmaking - share your ideas / stories

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    Discuss the NX1 hack and more. Share your mods. Share your tests.

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    Post classified ads for your camera gear and filmmaking related kit!

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EOSHD C-LOG and Film Profiles for All Canon DSLRs
EOSHD Pro Color for Sony cameras
EOSHD Pro Color for Panasonic cameras

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  • Posts

    • First Time Posting - Introducing myself with a new camera reel
      I don't have an F3, but I would exchange my AF100 for an F3 any day. The IQ you can get from an F3 is outstanding ! Yes it is a bit big, but you don't need much. A shoulder rig with the external recorder on it and a small zoom, and you're good to go. But if you like small systems, I can understand your problem. Personally, I don't mind having the AF100 (a bit smaller than the F3) on the shoulder rig plus a small bag of lenses.  Here are a couple overlays I made for some videos ... pretty simple stuff done as After Effects templates for the editor. I'd be happy to make a template for you if you want (and have a bit of an idea of what you want :D ).
    • Please explain: Video vs. "organic"/cinematic look
      I want neither.  This is just a discussion.     The film look and the "cinematic" look are different, but they are not mutually exclusive goals.     Let's not "put on airs."   I'm no huge fan of Seinfeld, but I would say that Seinfeld was more "cinematic" than the home films that I linked.  As I recall, on Seinfeld they occasionally did use camera movement (staging), inserts and nearby CUs (lensing) and they had motivated lighting to convey certain environments.  It was not entirely a flatly lit, distantly shot, three camera sitcom.   Even if Seinfeld were utterly "uncinematic," how does your point differ from my example of home movies not being cinematic, but being undeniably captured on film?     I don't think that we disagree here.  I am not advocating emphasis on post, nor am I suggesting that we should dwell on technical aspects.  I merely addressed your linked comparison (and the comparison that you quoted) between digital cameras and film stocks.   My point is simply that there are certain variables that can make video look like it was shot on film.  Some of these variables must be wrangled while shooting and some are dealt with in post, but none of them have anything to do with being "cinematic."     Not necessarily.  The Vilm camera had low dynamic range compared to current digital cameras.  Also, much of the early video that FilmLook processed was captured with analog cameras of low dynamic range.  Of course, having extra dynamic range helps.   In regards to bit depth, I don't think that it is an important factor in mimicking film.  There are plenty of film stocks that have low color depth, so high bit depth (as a factor of digital color depth) is not necessarily crucial in making video look like film.   By the way, as you may have gathered from the parenthetical part of the previous sentence, bit depth is not color depth.  Also, bit depth and dynamic range are independent properties.     I agree that peculiarities in how emulsion rolls off the highlights/bright areas is an important characteristic to address in emulating film with video.   After using up a significant portion of the dynamic range to deal with the highlights, it certainly is beneficial to have more room left over in the middle and low end for nice contrast range and color depth.  However, huge dynamic range is not crucial in merely making video look like film.     Peculiarities of emulsion grain likely should be considered when trying to emulate film with video.  I don't know anything about post grain similations, but film grain is a somewhat controversial and complex topic in regards to film look.   However, I have always understood that with negative stock, the grain clumps are usually larger and more overlapping in the bright areas, while grains are smaller but more separated and distinct in the dark areas.   Also, the way noise appears in the shadows in digital is somewhat analogous to the more visible grain in shadows with film, and there have certainly been a few posts in this forum about how noise from certain cameras feels "organic."     To me, whether or not film has an edge in color is largely subjective.   In addition, I couldn't say that all film has a greater color depth than all digital sensors.  the color depth of different film stocks varies dramatically, as does that of digital cameras/sensors.  Special processing also significantly affects color depth and contrast in emulsions.   Larger film formats yield greater color depth.  Higher bit depth does yield greater color depth in digital, but, again, bit depth and color depth are not the same thing.     No.  I'm not confusing display technology with capture technology.  I most certainly made a distinction between the viewing bit depth and the capture range in the YouTube scenario.   I was additionally making the point that low bit depth (in the post-capture) stage doesn't influence whether or not something looks like it was shot on film.  Apparently, we agree here.     I don't have have an Iphone (I never fell for the Apple trick), but I have no doubt that I could shoot something "cinematic" with it.
    • Interesting 2016 Sales Figures
      The problem with trying to draw conclusions from sales figures like these is that sales tend to be strongly weighted to the first few months after release. In Sony's case their major releases were in 2015, while 2016 was a slow year with minor releases. So lower unit sales is not surprising. We can expect their a7 mark 3 versions to be released in 2017, so they will likely have much higher unit sales this year compared to 2016.
    • WTB Zhiyun Crane
      Looking to buy one of these soon, I know many forum users have/had one of these. Anyone trying to sell theirs?
    • Please explain: Video vs. "organic"/cinematic look
      If we are talking about film vs. digital, there is also a huge difference in how exposure/luminance and colour saturation work together. A digital sensor uses additive colour (things get brighter as they saturate and combine), whereas film stock employs subtractive colour (things get darker as they saturate and combine). This is part of why digital sensors, especially ones that don't have crazy wide dynamic range are so prone to chroma clipping, and give off a "video-ish" look. If your digital camera has a wide dynamic range and you have managed your exposure, it could be possible with a proper LUT to emulate the colour chemistry of film, by having the luminance remapped according to the saturation level. That might help with trying to get that "organic" look.