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On 6/27/2017 at 10:07 AM, Justin Bacle said:

Not sure what is the best country to start your own small business, but I'd like to find it out :) 

 

On 6/27/2017 at 10:11 AM, HelsinkiZim said:

God - the US was so easy. You fill a one page form called p90 or something (the Uber type contract) if you are employed and pay self tax, or you go to Legalzoom or similar and set up a LLC for 100 bucks (last time I checked) and you are set. You pay tax as you earn - at the end of the tax year.

America is 'great' for a reason...

edit: in case I get negged as a foreigner, I was actually born in Oneonta, New York and worked in Chicago and NYC in my 20s. Crazy times... now... and then.


Heh, even easier in New Zealand, don't need to fill out any forms like that! Just go out and do.

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Sometimes it seems like other filmmakers online have an infinite pot of money to freely buy whatever bit of gear they want, when they please. 

Because of social media, we are bombarded with the "new toy" posts daily, so it gives this exaggerated impression that you're being left behind on the tech trail. 

The Philip Blooms of this world do purchase every camera, lens and innovative new product ever made, but that's because he's got sponsors, and his business model needs him to stay very current with this week's hottest gadget. He knows exactly what he's doing. 

Andrew runs a blog, has a clear passion and has a very clever way of making his dosh for new gizmos. Probably. 

Myself? I'm like the rest of you. I have to work bloody hard to get anything new. The video industry is massively competitive in the UK. Gets harder as each week passes. That's just the way it is. 

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Shrug, this is a hobby for me, VERY expen$ive one too!  Luckily?  I have a good paying job.  Unfortunately, it is full time, and VERY demanding/stressful, sigh...

Doesn't leave much time for important stuff, like family, hobbies, etc...

How I wish I could do this fulltime, it would be super great.

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Filmmaking is not my bread 'n butter either, I'm just some choch with a bunch of camera gear, lol. Funny enough it's my actual job where I genuinely fell in love with video for the first time. Though, that has been more about capturing great moments and stunning sights. I'd say I'm a very visually oriented person, so capturing something that's just visually pleasing is quite satisfying for me already, but I'd really like to get more into proper narrative work and I think it must be awesome to find yourself in legit production environments. I would probably hate to have to shoot weddings (I did the obligatory one where you're the close friend with the sweet camera gear that gets asked xD) and work with stressful people and deadlines though, so I'm glad that for the moment I can just screw around in my own pace doing stuff that's just fun and creative to me. Over the years I've sucked up a ton of knowledge here and there and I've failed but also learned heaps and you guys (and girls) here have been a great inspiration for me to get out there and shoot stuff! Just, with a fulltime job, as buggz seems to know all too well, what filmmaking concerned it's nearly impossible to do anything of any real significance on the side. Though, at the same time I also can't see me flipping it to be doing filmmaking fulltime either... I mean, now filmmaking is still all fun, doing whatever whenever I feel like it (well, more like 'whenever I get the time to'), but I know that every job (even if you're a a celeb actor/rockstar, succesful entrepeneur or austronaut) in the end is just that: 'a job' and not 'a voluntary'. Sure there's epic fun sides to it, but every coin has its flipside... so for me it's probably best not haste to ditch a good thing and then find myself struggling for surival (I'm sure there's much more talented people out there that probably have been shooting since they were 11 years old, have mad skills and experience and have figured out how to market themselves and are experts on new media).

Gotta say: never really grew up wanting to become a filmmaker either, I had other plans I've managed to realize in meanwhile, so it just never occured to me... but as this interest grew over the last few years... seems a shame not to do more with it? I mean, I love my job and it has been absolutely great and pays well enough that it has allowed me to purchase tons of gear (my lens collection especially might've gotten a little out of hand #teamoverkill), but it would be very awesome to go parttime and do some commercial/creative video work on the side, which looks like that might be happening first thing 2019, when after a good 10 years in Austria brushing up on German and devouring Sachertorte I'll be moving back to The Netherlands once again. :grin: Gotta do some inquiries concerning aerial video there, as that's a subject of interest as well, just Austria has been about the worst place to get into that (I think the 3DR Solo will have to wait forever for it to be exempted and allowed to get airborne here). Think the fix job (I'll commute to Vienna) with steady income combined with the freelance creative work will be a superb combo, I think I'll really appreciate the diversity. Now I just hope I can pull it off, so fingers crossed.

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I've been lucky the past year or so. I took a $2000 purchase of the XC10 and was able to sell it, for a small loss, but use that money to test a bunch of cameras. While I figured out what I wanted to shoot with, I consistently spent a small amount more to constantly upgrade what I tested until I was able to afford the 5D3.

Also I always bought better lenses than I had. So over the past couple years I was able to narrow down what I wanted to keep and make a good return on previous lens purchases.

Four years ago I could barely afford my $200 eos-m. now I should be able to afford a 1DC by next spring.

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1 hour ago, mercer said:

I've been lucky the past year or so. I took a $2000 purchase of the XC10 and was able to sell it, for a small loss, but use that money to test a bunch of cameras. While I figured out what I wanted to shoot with, I consistently spent a small amount more to constantly upgrade what I tested until I was able to afford the 5D3.

Also I always bought better lenses than I had. So over the past couple years I was able to narrow down what I wanted to keep and make a good return on previous lens purchases.

Four years ago I could barely afford my $200 eos-m. now I should be able to afford a 1DC by next spring.

How did you like the XC10? Is its autofocus any good? At what ISOs does it become problematic with ghosting from NR? Is it clean at 800 ISO? 1600 ISO? How do you find its low light compared with the 5D raw?

I was thinking of getting a B cam next year for use on the Ronin, once the prices bottom out a bit, and I could really use the 4k for a b cam because I inevitably warp stabilize Ronin footage to reduce translational bounce. The autofocus would be nice, too, if it it's half decent. 

 

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20 hours ago, DaveAltizer said:

I spent all the money I made on video on equipment when I was a teenager. Now I just sell stuff and re purchase things. Constantly selling and swapping for new stuff. Buy things that hold value. Canon stuff holds value well

The Canon C300 Mk II price dropped from $16,000 to $10,000 in just two years, so how can we ever be 100% sure what will hold value? 😕 But I understand, not all Canon gear drops 60% in two years! 

I would say resist the temptation to upgrade cameras each year and instead invest in lenses, lighting and audio gear from time to time. You'll keep those for years and they'll probably have a greater impact on your work than the very latest camera body. Since I live in a third world country, selling old gear and buying new all the time isn't really an option, as nobody here shoots micro four thirds, and I often have to leave the country if I want to get the latest and greatest. Recently, I had to fly to Malaysia just to pick up a second RodeLink. 

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1 hour ago, HockeyFan12 said:

How did you like the XC10? Is its autofocus any good? At what ISOs does it become problematic with ghosting from NR? Is it clean at 800 ISO? 1600 ISO? How do you find its low light compared with the 5D raw?

I was thinking of getting a B cam next year for use on the Ronin, once the prices bottom out a bit, and I could really use the 4k for a b cam because I inevitably warp stabilize Ronin footage to reduce translational bounce. The autofocus would be nice, too, if it it's half decent. 

 

I liked the XC10 a lot. It just lost its value way too fast for my comfort zone. Especially since prior to that, the most I had ever spent on a camera was $600.

I didn't notice the ghosting as much as others did. I shot comfortably up to 1600iso without any real noise issues. I haven't shot with 5D3 Raw at higher than 1600 either, but it hasn't bothered me.

This was 5D3 at 1600 ISO, but with the Nikkor 35mm 1.4 wide open, so that's still what... two stops better than the XC10 would be at 1600.

If my memory serves me I'd say 5D3 Raw is cleaner at 1600.

 

IMG_1025.JPG

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Looks good! Of course f1.4 makes big difference, doesn't it... 

How did you find the AF on the XC10? I've found that the DJI focus is a brilliant product but getting it and a cinema camera and everything rigged up and getting your AC by a wireless monitor system is such a pain. There are two kinds of Ronin shots I shgoot, mostly, following behind someone from behind and pushing in on their face from the front. The face stuff I bet the XC10 could handle... but can you follow behind someone okay in AF? The AF examples I see online look a bit dodgy, but I haven't seen many. The focus is deep, at least, I guess...

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16 hours ago, buggz said:

 I have a good paying job.  Unfortunately, it is full time, and VERY demanding/stressful, sigh...

I'm in the same boat. The main reason why I don't buy more new gear is that I don't have the time to learn how to use it. I've been shooting with the same Sony camera for close to 2 years now and I'm just getting to the point where every setting comes natural to me. If I were to get a Blackmagic and GH5 it might confuse me more than it would improve my shooting.

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For me it's a mixture of money from work and gigs.

I buy a lot of older SLR camera packages locally and split them up to sell them. I use the profits to buy more or buy gear. 

This has been a great learning experience for me and gets me a good return on my money. It's given me great opportunities to learn more about and upgrade my gear

I also use 0% financing options many stores have to pay off gear over time. If you're strict about it, this can be a great option and has really helped me out.








 

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I'm don't do video for a living so here is a different point of view.

I was going to school for photography when I got married. I sold off all of my gear to fund a place to live. I have an office job with kids, and cats. I found a vintage lens and resold to get a Canon T5 for one off event photography job on the side. I found 2 more vintage lenses, sold those and the T5 to buy GX85. I found an open box Zoom H1 for $50 at a retail store near by. I'll probably keep doing this and do overtime at work to get lenses and audio stuff. Hopefully will have enough time to shoot and land a small gig next year. I hate my office job, but it feeds my family.

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I have always prefered keeping my funds intact, so for the past 5 or 6 years we have just opened credit cards that have no interest for x amount of time, use the gear, and then sell it to pay off the card as the kick in date for interest approaches.

This allows us to stay current while not ever really breaking the bank.  It also keeps our credit score extremely high (bonus for self employed people).  If you choose cameras and gear that hold their value AND shop for deals, you can almost break even at the end.  We have done that a few times.

The CitiBank card is 21 months @ 0% and we have a 30k limit.  Lenses keep their value, so they are a pretty safe buy. Cameras are tricky so it makes a little more sense to go Alexa if you're looking to sell, as they hold their value a lot longer.  If you get a great deal on an Alexa or Mini, you could conceivably make a profit at the end.  It ends up being (if nothing else) a super cheap 21 month rental.  Shoot like crazy, then sell.

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37 minutes ago, Neumann Films said:

I have always prefered keeping my funds intact, so for the past 5 or 6 years we have just opened credit cards that have no interest for x amount of time, use the gear, and then sell it to pay off the card as the kick in date for interest approaches.

This allows us to stay current while not ever really breaking the bank.  It also keeps our credit score extremely high (bonus for self employed people).  If you choose cameras and gear that hold their value AND shop for deals, you can almost break even at the end.  We have done that a few times.

The CitiBank card is 21 months @ 0% and we have a 30k limit.  Lenses keep their value, so they are a pretty safe buy. Cameras are tricky so it makes a little more sense to go Alexa if you're looking to sell, as they hold their value a lot longer.  If you get a great deal on an Alexa or Mini, you could conceivably make a profit at the end.  It ends up being (if nothing else) a super cheap 21 month rental.  Shoot like crazy, then sell.

I have a friend that just picked up an Alexa classic package on eBay for $12k. I would agree with you though that getting a new Alexa and selling within 2 years would retain value better. If you have the capital.

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1 hour ago, AaronChicago said:

I have a friend that just picked up an Alexa classic package on eBay for $12k. I would agree with you though that getting a new Alexa and selling within 2 years would retain value better. If you have the capital.

Anything new would depreciate somewhat over two years. You want to find yourself a really good deal, or buy secondhand. 

I'd be fascinated to hear more about this Arri Alexa Classic for $12K, as I've been posting quite often pointing out they exist!!

Could you convince him to come on over to here and start a new thread about his purchase? That would be AMAZING! 

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5 hours ago, Neumann Films said:

I have always prefered keeping my funds intact, so for the past 5 or 6 years we have just opened credit cards that have no interest for x amount of time, use the gear, and then sell it to pay off the card as the kick in date for interest approaches.

This allows us to stay current while not ever really breaking the bank.  It also keeps our credit score extremely high (bonus for self employed people).  If you choose cameras and gear that hold their value AND shop for deals, you can almost break even at the end.  We have done that a few times.

The CitiBank card is 21 months @ 0% and we have a 30k limit.  Lenses keep their value, so they are a pretty safe buy. Cameras are tricky so it makes a little more sense to go Alexa if you're looking to sell, as they hold their value a lot longer.  If you get a great deal on an Alexa or Mini, you could conceivably make a profit at the end.  It ends up being (if nothing else) a super cheap 21 month rental.  Shoot like crazy, then sell.

Yeah that kind of works, but you're not factoring in an insurance policy for your new gear. Or at least be prepared to cough up for an expensive repair or worse the loss of the whole thing. With certain pieces of gear you can just sub to a rental house to defray the cost.

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2 hours ago, silvertonesx24 said:

Yeah that kind of works, but you're not factoring in an insurance policy for your new gear. Or at least be prepared to cough up for an expensive repair or worse the loss of the whole thing. With certain pieces of gear you can just sub to a rental house to defray the cost.

You need that either way though...makes no difference how you pay for your gear. Also, there are cheap options out there for insurance that cover gear like that.  

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