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Who will kill filmmaking first?


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Is there No Limit to our suffering.

Locked in a race as to who can kill the arts first, we bear witness to a gargantuan dick swinging contest fought between haphazard bureaucrats in government and a deadly bat pathogen. The fight is escalating with no end in sight, but one thing is for sure – corporate America will profit endlessly.

New blog post:

https://www.eoshd.com/news/who-will-kill-filmmaking-first/

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Australia is a continent, with huge natural resources, thousands of miles from anywhere else. Canada is half a continent, next door to the biggest market in the world, and if you think that neighbour

Yeah so did I, there was a lot of ideology and feelings wasn't there in the run up to the referendum and very little fact. You had to brush it off and do a character judgement on those advocating for

A lot of assumptions about me in this I don't like. But let's focus on the facts. If we rewind to 2005, you are probably not with a strong opinion on the EU. Probably getting on with your life ju

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2 hours ago, Andrew Reid said:

Most of our governments with the exception of New Zealand, Norway, Finland and Taiwan are merely reactive committees,

Unfortunately if you lived in NZ and closely followed the ridiculous slapstick comedy of events here, then you'd realize NZ's government is no exception. They're a reactive committee too, to put it charitably, and a very slowly reacting one too. 

We only look so good to the rest of the world thanks more to dumb luck than anything else, and due to the amazingly good hand of cards the gods dealt us in the first place. 

Because we're a low density country, which is an island by ourselves (easy natural barriers to defend ourselves with! Zero land borders with anybody else), in the middle of nowhere (sandwiched between a sea and an ocean), with only one city that is also the most remote city in the entire world!

If last year was a computer game simulation we were playing, you couldn't hope for a better starting position! It's like playing the game on easy mode. How much credit can you really give our government when they're playing the game in the easiest of easy modes??
(oh plus also, during the earliest months while everyone in the world was trying to figure out a response we were in the midst of summer, and didn't need to be in the extra hard mode of doing this in middle of winter. Yet another natural factor that was in NZ's favor)

Then on top of this, we also had one of the world's harshest lockdowns a country has had for initially for quite a long while. (good for squashing a virus? But the economic consequences of that are not trivial and can't be ignored forever) And yet, we still had to later on in the year go into a second lockdown. Fingers and toes crossed that we don't get a third!

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2 hours ago, IronFilm said:

And yet, we still had to later on in the year go into a second lockdown. Fingers and toes crossed that we don't get a third!

Appreciate what you're saying, but I guess we sure would like to be going into a 3rd lockdown after 25 deaths than after 70K+. There's governmental incompetence and then there's 21st century UK Conservative Party governmental incompetence!

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The trick succeeded only because the people’s interests had been twisted for years in an orchestrated campaign of propaganda. Before the mention of a Brexit referendum...

(Sighing) 

Here we go again, another article demonising the working classes. People Andrew Reid does not know and has never met, but apparently knows everything about and is quick to stereotype. Same tired old cliches...blah blah, led by donkeys, didn't know what they were voting for, lied to....blah blah blah. Honestly, this article could have been written by Yasmin Alibhai-Brown.

A quick UK history lesson... In 1975 the UK voted to join a common market with other European countries, not to join a political union. Many Labour MPs (e.g. Tony Benn, Michael Foot, Barbara Castle etc), unions and labour voters were against joining at that time. So euroscepticism has never been a right or left issue.

Flash forward to the present. The EU bears no relation to the common market people in 1975 voted to join. It was long over due that the people of the UK be asked if they wanted to be part of a political union.

On 12 Dec 2019 (UK election day) the people voted to save democracy and uphold the 2016 referendum result. A million times more important than Brexit, democracy itself was on the ballot paper. Thankfully enough British people still believe in the ballot box and they did just that. This is why in areas like mine, the Redwall (traditional Labour voting areas but not socialist) crumbled.

It will go down in UK political and democratic history as one of the most remarkable and important nights ever. Not because Boris Johnson and the Conservative party got an 80 seat majority. But because people from towns and villagers all over the UK lent their votes to save Democracy and once and for all crush the idea that MPs, the BBC, ITV, Sky, big business, newspapers, the establishment and powerful vested interests get to decide election results.

Apparently, Andrew Reid believes working class british people are drones. He's very wrong about that.

 

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"personal attributes above don’t stand out in a modern show-biz style argument on TV news, let alone in a tabloid newspaper, which is how we decide who we elect."

As it is in all democracies.  We endure the mood swings of populism.

I do think we've basically drifted away from the solemnity of attitudes that affected culture after WWII and we're leaning hard back into humanity's default mode.  Your anecdote about Germany supports this argument, I believe.  Their culture reflects the gravitas of a nation that learned lessons in a very hard and disturbing way.

From my perspective in the states, Americans are isolationists so we have an unfortunate ability to be narcissistic, knee-jerk-contrarian, and insular.  We're doomed to have non-serious people elect other non-serious people until that way creates a crisis and tragedy....then we'll all be like, "damn, we can't do that anymore."   A few generations will pass, rinse-repeat.  WWII interrupted this cycle and also heaved a victor/spoils unto us right at the height of the industrial revolution, so we've been on the happy side of the scale for a short stretch.  We're spoiled children, to be it bluntly --and now our toys are breaking or have broken.  Throw in a pandemic that basically is trying to steal our last lollipop and you see how the Boomers react to it.

Also, the whole lock-down thing exposes a flaw I can't stand regarding a global economy.  I'd much more prefer micro-economies regionally based that would create more local employment in the trades and food distribution, but that model is an unfortunate fantasy and has many flaws as well.  Eh, that's a tangent.

Like you said, it's always a choice of trying to decide what's the lesser of two evils.  Nobody likes doing that.  We here, unfortunately, have been conditioned to think we're entitled to the best of anything we want. 

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All that said, art thrives in chaos, as it should.  That too is human nature.  Whatever models exist to help create that art might change, but it'll happen.  Yes, in the brave new world it will have a harder time to rise above the noise, but the good stuff will be always be vibrant and endure.

Always remember when looking back into the past and considering art that what survives also existed amongst a sea of mediocrity.  We recognize the good stuff because previous generation have curated it for us.

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1 hour ago, fuzzynormal said:

We're doomed to have non-serious people elect other non-serious people

This, I think, is the crux of our problems in the West currently. Seriousness is no longer either a requirement nor a virtue in elected politicians. Especially in the Anglosphere (with a couple of exceptions), we've taken to electing deeply unserious people who, even worse, are completely insulated by wealth from the results of their witless tinkering.

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If you haven't noticed the devolution of culture and society since at least 9/11 then you REALLY have been asleep.....the virus and reaction were ultimately more like the conclusion to the sadly deliberate and ongoing devolution.......and scummy transfer of wealth and power during a time of unquestioning 'fear' (or 'f you freedom'!).

The first thing they did was to sadly divide society which is the last thing you do to maintain a society.

"Each and every one of us are trading our world class EU passport for something clearly inferior and more limited"

I think folks might have been more concerned by local issues (self determination?) which were constantly ignored or negated than they were about their access to a better passport.

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6 hours ago, fuzzynormal said:

From my perspective in the states, Americans are isolationists

I WISH isolationism was the dominant thread of politics in America, unfortunately the constant nonstop wars USA gets into decade after decades proves that is not the case. American politics is very very much so interventionist, and not isolationist. 
(and wars are but one way that Americans meddle with affairs overseas 😕 )

6 hours ago, fuzzynormal said:

WWII interrupted this cycle and also heaved a victor/spoils unto us

Was USA really the winner in WW2?
Technically the conventional thinking is indeed that USA "won" WW2, but if it was any kind of victory at all it is was a borderline pyrrhic victory. 

https://www.fff.org/2012/02/16/won-world-war-ii-2/

6 hours ago, fuzzynormal said:

We're doomed to have non-serious people elect other non-serious people

"Those who seek power are not worthy of that power. " ~ Plato
(basically if someone wants to be a politician... that should rule them out as a good option!)

"The best argument against Democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter."

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2 hours ago, IronFilm said:

but if it was any kind of victory at all it is was a borderline pyrrhic victory. 

I’m not implying the US carried the burden of victory in Europe.  For that you have to hand it to the Russians and their relentless war of attrition. Of course the Brits holding on and keeping their front a challenge made a big difference.

I’m talking about coming out of the thing being in the best shape. Political clout. Natural resources unmolested. Banging economy. A lot of the German scientists. —The post war boom was incredible. The atomic age in the USA was filled with affluence and optimism.  

The goal in WWII may have been to take down fascism, but we certainly got rewarded in the aftermath.

Also, we’re a nation of citizens that are very much isolationists, (not as much as 80 years ago) but our government was certainly emboldened by WWII to change that attitude. 

Still, insular attitudes by most US citizens is a definitely a fact. Barely 40% have a passport. 

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6 hours ago, fuzzynormal said:

Still, insular attitudes by most US citizens is a definitely a fact. Barely 40% have a passport. 

In fact many Americans consider they go to a different country when they go to a different US state, while for Europeans that would be seen as going only to a different region

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@Andrew Reid - I agree on so many levels. It's at a point so monstrous and disorientating it's just.... f*cked. 

You're around Manchester aren't you? My space is open. You could occupy one of the (many) empty coworking desks with free coffee etc, bitch about celebrity Youtubers, play with my C70 and film the empty sad streets around the utopian Ancoats area. It's dark and raining. 

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5 hours ago, 1Ale82 said:

In fact many Americans consider they go to a different country when they go to a different US state, while for Europeans that would be seen as going only to a different region

Hmmm, opinions and all that, but I am pretty sure there is a lot bigger difference between European countries than there is between US States?!

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1 hour ago, MrSMW said:

Hmmm, opinions and all that, but I am pretty sure there is a lot bigger difference between European countries than there is between US States?!

Depends which countries and which states you're referring to. 
I'd say there is a bigger difference between New York and Alaska, than there is between Sweden and Norway. 

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2 minutes ago, IronFilm said:

Depends which countries and which states you're referring to. 
I'd say there is a bigger difference between New York and Alaska, than there is between Sweden and Norway. 

There's a lot of difference between London and a small Village in Yorkshire, yet both are in England... 😉

Ultimately in Europe you have changes in language between Countries, the need for passports at some crossings, and of course, there's no Europe President. 

US is more akin to the UK, where we have Countries Wales, Scotland and NI with their own rules and Government, with variations much like the various states in America.  However crossing to them doesn't carry the same weight as say visiting France, Germany or Spain.  I can still speak English in Scotland, pay by the same currency and follow rules that are similar to my own Country.  This isn't the case with other Coutries in Europe.  Even though the EU as the Euro, countries like Norway have their own currency, and culture can vary more. 

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2 hours ago, IronFilm said:

Depends which countries and which states you're referring to. 
I'd say there is a bigger difference between New York and Alaska, than there is between Sweden and Norway. 

Kiwis and Aussies...and then there are those folks in Tassie 😉

Sweden and Denmark speak a different language but mostly understand each other. I’ve watched ‘The Bridge’ 🙂

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Basically the world has become some kind of crazy B-movie mix of They Live, The Crazies and a Brave New world but told in an Instagram Stories/TikTok bite sized chunks manner so that we will never understand or care about the big picture. Whilst we are distracted by all this, 99.9% of us will become poorer and the environment will finally be completely trashed.

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