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Andrew Reid

Martin Scorsese and Christopher Nolan campaign launches "Filmmaker Mode" TV settings on upcoming LG and Panasonic sets

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The electronics manufacturers have always had a strange relationship with 24p.

It's tempting to look at classic cinema as a quaint, anticipated thing of the past. It's an under-fire aesthetic like never before.

YouTubers seem happy with 30p or 60p and TVs do their best to smooth over the cinema look by default.

Well, not any more - according to the Hollywood Reporter, Filmmaker Mode is debuting on upcoming TVs by virtue of the UHD Alliance and some of cinema's best known directors.

Read the full article

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EOSHD Pro Color for Sony cameras EOSHD Pro LOG for Sony CamerasEOSHD C-LOG and Film Profiles for All Canon DSLRs

Thank goodness! I've been waging a one-man war against that nauseating soap opera "smooth motion" fake image interpolation-look on various family, friends', hotel's and even the occasional restaurant's TV sets for years. The saddest thing is when people claim they can't tell the difference. I can't stand it.

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I turned “TruMotion” off on my LG tv and didn’t say anything. No one complained about it. It’s honestly hilarious how companies try to sell consumers on “this tv will do fake 240fps in 28K, which is why it’s better.”  Same with, “Canon is used by NFL sports photographers and Peter McKinnon and Potato Jet told me to buy a Canon T7 instead of a Panasonic g7!  Canon must be the best.”

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Unless the sets are factory-calibrated, which is impossible at consumer prices, the best they can do is remove the worst default settings, like motion smoothing, digital enhancements and image sharpening.  Beyond that, it remains to be seen how accurate the picture is or if they even attempt color accuracy.

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16 minutes ago, helium said:

Unless the sets are factory-calibrated, which is impossible at consumer prices, the best they can do is remove the worst default settings, like motion smoothing, digital enhancements and image sharpening.  Beyond that, it remains to be seen how accurate the picture is or if they even attempt color accuracy.

There's ISF Expert and Technicolour modes on the current LG OLEDs which attempt to do a half decent job of cinematic images.

It doesn't need to be absolutely perfect but it needs to be right, and OLEDs are very capable panels.

Problem is TV companies seem to forget the image processing part.

Doesn't Dolby Vision have meta data to tell the TV to show the content as intended?

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Isn't that something Panasonic tvs have been claiming for a while (like 2016-ish) now with their HCX PRO Intelligent Processor and 'The Choice of Hollywood Professionals', 'Hollywood to your Home', 'Master HDR', 'Studio Master Pro', 'Experience the Filmmaker's Vision with the Hollywood Cinema Experience' and whatnot.

Though, I guess that's mostly color, contrast and that sorta thing.

I bought an LG OLED tv because everybody said it was the best of the best. I mean, it's much better than a Samsung or ALDI Medion tv or whatevz. But depending on time of the day and content I'm watching I continually have to change profiles and brightness which kinda gets annoying. Honestly, the ISF Expert and Technicolor profiles are so dark, even on the brightest setting in a fairly dim environment, that to me they are unusable (that one Game of Thrones-episode kind of bad). The whole thing is a bit cumbersome as well. You have make changes through somewhat complex menu structures that overlay. Dunno. Should be some ambient sensors measuring light intensity and color temperature of the room it's in and adjust itself accordingly, there's an 'auto' mode on the brightness, but it doesn't really work all that well I've found. It then should select a picture profile according the displayed content (sports, movie, etc). I'm not as blown away by the experience (I used to watch pretty much everything on my laptop or either go to the cinema). Was more blown away by my Chinese XGIMI projector. Guess size is still the greatest tool to immerse an audience. Audio is a great part of that too. For that I bought the Dolby Atmos LG SK10Y with SPK8-S, here as well... not really living up to the hype?

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HOOOORAY!

Shows like The Walking Dead will no longer look like your some of your mates have made some half assed horror film with Grandpa's handycam bought from the supermarket. 

Why did the manufacturers think this looked better anyway? It's like turning off the power steering in your car and replacing it with "Smooth Ride" or something, which actually cheapens the feel of the car. 

They should also roll out a forced firmware update for every TV that you have no option but to receive (like a friendly virus), so us video and film people can stop fixing our friends and families TV sets. 

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16 hours ago, Shell64 said:

Same with, “Canon is used by NFL sports photographers and Peter McKinnon and Potato Jet told me to buy a Canon T7 instead of a Panasonic g7!  Canon must be the best.”

I always take what you tubers recommend with a nice heap of salt. They need to maintain relationships with these companies to get paid, whether directly or indirectly, with monies or free gear or exclusive access. They all have angles they don’t talk about. They are essentially in the advertisement business. Their job is to influenced us.

This is why I come to EOSHD.

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19 hours ago, Parker said:

Thank goodness! I've been waging a one-man war against that nauseating soap opera "smooth motion" fake image interpolation-look on various family, friends', hotel's and even the occasional restaurant's TV sets for years. The saddest thing is when people claim they can't tell the difference. I can't stand it.

My friend, I've tried to give lessons for free in occasional restaurants to waitresses (don't lose your time with waiters! LOL : ) so go figure how I feel your pain! (E : -)

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I had changed the picture quality on my parents' tv to a nice natural looking image. When they came back it was like 'ewwww! What's wrong with the tv?! It's like I'm watching the screen through a frosted milk bottle!'. They're so used to extreme bright, extreme contrast, supersaturated images always keeping things on factory settings, that they've got no idea they're watching eyestraining garbage. And I'm afraid it's a lost battle. Luckily then there's these kinds of initiatives that I hope can still make a difference.

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It’s welcome, but I am not buying a new tv just for this.  Maybe some people will and maybe that’s in part, the reason why they are introduced this.  So don’t charge me extra for turning off features and it is a win...  also, I would be interested to see if with high brightness panels they would be able to tune it to work with the light on in the room.  I assume part of watching a film is being in a darken room...

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24p might be a big thing for television and the internet, but there is an elephant in the room I hear seldom mentioned: the extreme differences in how the same video looks by different search engines. Look at a video on Safari that some one has worked hard on color grading and getting just the right tone. Now look at it on Google Chrome, now Fire Fox, etc. There are wide and wild disparities. It's discouraging to see what a mess things look like after you've taken care to get things right.

And we're talking about a video you know looks good looking terrible, with outrageous hue and saturation differences, etc. You should expect some differences, but what I've seen is outrageous.

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The Filmmaker’s Mode needs to go further in my opinion than just TV manufacturers.

It needs to be a widely used standard available on everything from home cinema projectors to laptops. Apple and YouTube should be involved, as well as Sony, Samsung and the big tech giants.

They need educating!

@Andrew Reid hear, hear~!

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