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Dan Wake

Netflix minimum requirements camera

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EOSHD Pro Color for Sony cameras EOSHD Pro LOG for Sony CamerasEOSHD C-LOG and Film Profiles for All Canon DSLRs

We had quite a long thread about this a while ago and the general consensus was that for most of us the list was of about as much immediate concern as a list of recommended footwear that you should put on for a meeting with the Loch Ness Monster would be.

The list is for Netflix's own content that they commission for Netflix Originals rather than for external content that they buy in so you can make it on whatever you want within reason and if it's good enough then they will buy it.

Especially if it's a documentary about Nessie's footwear preferences.

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It's more than fair. You have a lot of low budget/pro choices like the FS7, URSA Mini Pro, C300 MKII, RED Raven and the EVA 1. Cameras like A7SII / GH5 are photo/hybrid cameras, not "real" digital cinema cameras.

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34 minutes ago, kaylee said:

has it ever happened in history that someone made a good film that ppl liked that didnt get picked up strictly because of the camera it was shot on? im guessing no

That list it’s for Netflix Originals or in-house productions, not for external movies or series.

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Assuming this is the only list of criteria, the Pocket2 should easily meet it, along with my XC10 and any other 4k log camera.

The tricky standard is the AES/EBU broadcast standard, which is WAY more stringent, including lens mounts, ISO performance and all kinds of good stuff.

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47 minutes ago, Dan Wake said:

in your opinion is the new black magic pocket 4k enough good to be added in that list?

Even leaving aside the fact that no one has used the camera to form any informed opinion, it will always be the case that the only opinion that matters is that of Netflix.

If you find yourself in the position of being commissioned by Netflix to do one of their Netflix Originals then that is the only time that list will matter. At which point it will be the least of your concerns.

Until then, concentrate on getting yourself into that position in the first place. 

 

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That list is for Netflix commissioned productions -- plenty of films shot on different cameras are available on Netflix (like the regular strength Alexa). Their technical requirements stem from their product -- if they offer 4k streaming then they have to capture in at least 4k. And really if you have a project that Netflix is picking up for production they're going to provide you with the budget to hire a camera they need. They might buy an amazing no-budget indie shot on a dslr for distribution (I'm pretty sure Tiny Furniture and Upstream Color are both on Netflix), it's an entirely different thing altogether for a Netflix production. 

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6 hours ago, jhnkng said:

That list is for Netflix commissioned productions -- plenty of films shot on different cameras are available on Netflix (like the regular strength Alexa). 


Exactly. 

To be on Netflix in general there are no minimum requirements. 

You could shoot it on 8mm film! Or an iPhone! Or heck, even a Barbie Doll Camera! If you can make it work for your story. 

It is only for Netflix commissioned Nexflix Originals, which 99% of us on this forum are not going to be pulling the strings on with producing it at a high level. 

And *IF* you are in that situation, you'll also have provided a budget which is plenty large enough you don't have to instead go with whatever is the current hot EOSHD forum camera darling. 

 

Quote

The ARRI Alexa XT/SXT/Mini and Amira are fantastic cameras, and we stream plenty of content that was captured with these cameras. However, since these cameras do not have true 4K sensors, we cannot accept them for our 4K Original productions.
 

 

The ARRI Alexa XT/SXT/Mini and Amira are fantastic cameras, and we stream plenty of content that was captured with these cameras. However, since these cameras do not have true 4K sensors, we cannot accept them for our 4K Original productions.
 

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9 hours ago, IronFilm said:


Exactly. 

To be on Netflix in general there are no minimum requirements. 

You could shoot it on 8mm film! Or an iPhone! Or heck, even a Barbie Doll Camera! If you can make it work for your story. 

It is only for Netflix commissioned Nexflix Originals, which 99% of us on this forum are not going to be pulling the strings on with producing it at a high level. 

And *IF* you are in that situation, you'll also have provided a budget which is plenty large enough you don't have to instead go with whatever is the current hot EOSHD forum camera darling. 

 

 

The ARRI Alexa XT/SXT/Mini and Amira are fantastic cameras, and we stream plenty of content that was captured with these cameras. However, since these cameras do not have true 4K sensors, we cannot accept them for our 4K Original productions.
 

I wouldn't be so dismissive of Dan; if he's posting this here he's most likely in talks with someone at Netflix or is prepping a show to pitch to them that for some reason has a requirement for a smaller, more mobile camera, but he wants feedback from people using those cameras before talking with the suits. Otherwise this would just be a waste of time to discuss.

Even if they're paying a few million dollars an episode, that won't make a cinema camera as small as a GH5–and for some shots for some shows you need a smaller, more mobile camera. 

In my (limited) experience with Netflix they're surprisingly flexible. They'll accept B camera footage or stock footage that's not even 4k, though they prefer if it is, and I even worked on one show acquired as a Netflix original that was shot in 1080p with the caveat that when they produce the next season it will be 4k and they will choose the cameras. For the right content, they'll even make exceptions for Netflix originals. I think the ban on Alexas is arbitrary; other online content providers will accept 3.2k for 4k upscale and it still looks better than F55 or Red footage, but otherwise Netflix does not seem too strict to me and they do seem focused on content over spec.

So I'd emphasize the content. If it's a Blair Witch-style show or you need crash cams or something I'd talk with them about it directly and maybe see if you can shoot with an A cam that's on the list while still relying heavily on the smaller cameras. Look for something with all the necessary specs for the B cams; the GH5 comes closest. Read the portion about secondary cameras and camera tests and see if you can meet them halfway. 

What I wouldn't do is ask an opinionated community of enthusiasts their opinions. ;) 

However far your series is in development, good luck and don't let something small like camera choice get in your way. I believe you can hire a crew out to shoot tests to prove your point, and I suspect that choosing the right A cam will give you a lot more flexibility with B cams so don't see it as all or nothing. I think the GH5 will be your best bet based on its specs, size, and internal recording ability. Maybe that and an EVA1? 

There's also the Venice, which has a special tether option for steadicam ops that's being used on the Avatar sequels. Clumsier than an Alexa mini, but it meets the specs and the footage looks AMAZING.

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Well I think there is a notion that if you are planning a spec project that you’d like to eventually sell to Netflix, that you may have a leg up if you follow the guidelines that Netflix uses for their original content. 

With the GH5, and possibly the P4K, being readily available at near consumer prices, it isn’t necessarily a bad idea to use one of those cameras, but in the end, the quality of the spec film will trump the camera and codec it was shot with.

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10 minutes ago, mercer said:

Well I think there is a notion that if you are planning a spec project that you’d like to eventually sell to Netflix, that you may have a leg up if you follow the guidelines that Netflix uses for their original content. 

With the GH5, and possibly the P4K, being readily available at near consumer prices, it isn’t necessarily a bad idea to use one of those cameras, but in the end, the quality of the spec film will trump the camera and codec it was shot with.

Absolutely true. I actually worked on a project that Netflix acquired as an original despite being shot in 1080p... because the content was good and there was a market for it. But for the following seasons they're going with 4k acquisition.

But Netflix will still buy films that aren't 4k if they aren't originals, and generally they want some creative control over originals. The above experience is VERY rare. It was even more unusual in that each episode cost (so far as I know) less than a million dollars to produce due to the nature of the show, so the risk was relatively low. Even if you can keep the budget ultra low like that, I still wouldn't throw that kind of money at a series and shoot the whole thing on spec, I would just produce a pilot and go from there to mitigate risk. So I have to assume Dan has already had his series picked up, or there's already interest from different networks based on a script or spec, but that it requires smaller cameras for the filming style.

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