Jump to content
Mattias Burling

How stills killed casual video for me

Recommended Posts

1 minute ago, Axel said:

That's a good approach! With limited resources, one is forced to concentrate. Whenever I see someone take photos in burst mode, I think he/she hasn't understood the first thing about photography. But that's just me. 

Applicable to video as well. Imagine you have an expensive roll of film in your camera, just a few minutes. Imagine you could not immediately check the recording. Wouldn't this sharpen your senses? 

It would make you more self aware of the process for sure. But is also adds a deep sense of anxiety because you know that roll of film is expensive and unforgiving and you have one chance to nail it.

I started out in celluloid film. I'm not one of these guys that holds any nostalgia for the format because I remember that sense of pressure and anxiety to nail it or be very unpopular with the people around you. There's a sense of artistic freedom (but with it comes laziness) that digital gives you. Freedom from the stress of failure. Digital makes it okay to fail. Failure is a huge part of growth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
EOSHD Pro Color for Sony cameras EOSHD Pro LOG for Sony CamerasEOSHD C-LOG and Film Profiles for All Canon DSLRs

Nice theme, I think. Simply, I need a more complex language to express - or, better, striving to express - more complex thoughts and feelings.

To be honest, I don't think that photography could be (for Westernian type of mind) in all extensity - repeat: in all extensity - form of art as great literature or classic music. Yes, it has precious dignity of skills and taste and knowledge. Yes there are great photo testaments of compassion and capability to extricate significant moment from banality - and as so, help to better experience the world. (And yes, I little disagree with Susan Sonthag and agree with Walter Benjamin.) Maybe it is similar to haiku poetry.

But it is impossible to express - or, better - to completely involve, as sort of full-senses initiation, other man in haiku as in, say, Beethoven's Eroica.

Further thinking, it seems to me that photography maybe is much more closer to sort of feeling/thinking/expression of Eastern mind? There always existed that wonderful feeling for moment, for profound non-ego encounter with mistery of nature and existence.

Western greek/judeochristian civillization and state of mind always relayed on inner and outer drama, complexity, struggle, personality - and its picks of art and distinctive philosophy are such that can embrace world of turmoil complexity, as in Servantes, Goya, Shakespeare, Dostoyevski, Beethoven-to-Mahler/Shostakovich symphonies...

Probably that's the reason why I'm longing for video/movie as language, greatly respecting type of mind and spirit that stay behind profound photography masters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, anonim said:

Nice theme, I think. Simply, I need a more complex language to express - or, better, striving to express - more complex thoughts and feelings.

To be honest, I don't think that photography could be (for Westernian type of mind) in all extensity - repeat: in all extensity - form of art as great literature or classic music. Yes, it has precious dignity of skills and taste and knowledge. Yes there are great photo testaments of compassion and capability to extricate significant moment from banality - and as so, help to better experienced world. (And yes, I little disagree with Susan Sonthag and agree with Walter Benjamin.) Maybe it is similar to haiku poetry.

But it is impossible to express - or, better - to completely involve, as sort of full-senses initiation, other man in haiku as in, say, Beethoven's Eroica.

Further thinking, it seems to me that photography maybe is much more closer to sort of feeling/thinking/expression to Eastern mind? There always existed that wonderful feeling for moment, for profound non-ego encounter with mistery of nature and existence.

Western greek/judeochristian civillization and state of mind always relayed on inner and outer drama, complexity, struggle, personality - and its picks of art and distinctive philosophy are such that can embrace world of turmoil complexity, as in Shakespeare, Dostoyevski, Beethoven-to-Mahler/Shostakovich symphonies...

Probably that's the reason why I'm longing for video/movie as language, greatly respecting type of mind and spirit that stay behind profound photography masters.

When in doubt you can also just throw some more Emulation-Beutness at the problem. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, anonim said:

@Matthew Hartman

Maybe, we'll see... I'm slowly warming-up Jester with broken English :)

BTW How nice is your surname - I immediately imagine of whom of to-me-dear creator are you descendant - the Nicolai Hartman, the Heinz Hartman, the Karl Amadeus Hartman... :)

It's a common German surname (I'm not German, I'm American) but part of my family is descended from south Germany, although on my father's side we've been living here in the States since colonial times. In fact we had some personal conflicts with Thomas Jefferson, as he tried to hang one of my great grandfathers for treason against the United States for his loyalty to the King of England. A lot of ppl don't know that during those times no one trusted anyone, and George Washington wasn't a trusted figure at all either.

Also have relatives that fought in the civil war. 

We are related to Lisa Hartman, the wife of Clint Black. 

Sorry, a bit of a history buff. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I know the feeling. I often make random video's and often think stills would be more creative. And whenever I am doing photoshoots, I like it a lot, because the set ups are faster. I only need 1 frame that is good instead of 100 good frames. On the other hand I feel like I need to shoot more video, as I want to be a film maker, and need to train my cinematography skills, and you always need a recent portfolio. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another huge reason that pushed me towards stills was also the ability to shoot film every single day without spending much money.
Cinestill even makes Kodak Motion Picture very available for still shooters. Raw and Film in your bag at all times.
And it also opens up the door to very affordable medium and even large format.

It's intoxicating :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Mattias Burling said:

Another huge reason that pushed me towards stills was also the ability to shoot film every single day without spending much money.
Cinestill even makes Kodak Motion Picture very available for still shooters. Raw and Film in your bag at all times.
And it also opens up the door to very affordable medium and even large format.

It's intoxicating :)

We've got a company here in the UK called Nik & Trick who are marketing Vision 250D in 36 exposure rolls and have perfected low-volume remjet removal and processing (using RA4 chemicals, I understand). I'm eagerly awaiting the return of my first roll of photos taken on that. They sell the Eterna movie films for stills use as well. I look upon film photography now as having a bag full of different sensors - quite intoxicating, as you say. Now I must go and replace the seals on the Canonet QL19 that arrived yesterday (£40, perfect condition) so it's ready for my monthly trip to London on Friday.

Speaking of stills - your Instagram account is one of the best I follow - keep it up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, Mattias Burling said:

Another huge reason that pushed me towards stills was also the ability to shoot film every single day without spending much money.
Cinestill even makes Kodak Motion Picture very available for still shooters. Raw and Film in your bag at all times.
And it also opens up the door to very affordable medium and even large format.

It's intoxicating :)

Haha yeah I have been doubting for 6 months for buying a vintage hasselblad. The downside is that I need to drive to a place to develop my photo's, as I cannot do it at home. There are scanners that are cheap, but I find the difference in quality too great to go cheap.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, zerocool22 said:

Haha yeah I have been doubting for 6 months for buying a vintage hasselblad. The downside is that I need to drive to a place to develop my photo's, as I cannot do it at home. There are scanners that are cheap, but I find the difference in quality too great to go cheap.  

Developing at home is very easy and cost effective. No darkroom required. And if you have a digital camera that shoots raw you can make DIY set-up that is just as goos as the best scanners out there. Most pro labs around here have switched to camera scanning.

2 hours ago, Tim Sewell said:

We've got a company here in the UK called Nik & Trick who are marketing Vision 250D in 36 exposure rolls and have perfected low-volume remjet removal and processing (using RA4 chemicals, I understand). I'm eagerly awaiting the return of my first roll of photos taken on that. They sell the Eterna movie films for stills use as well. I look upon film photography now as having a bag full of different sensors - quite intoxicating, as you say. Now I must go and replace the seals on the Canonet QL19 that arrived yesterday (£40, perfect condition) so it's ready for my monthly trip to London on Friday.

Speaking of stills - your Instagram account is one of the best I follow - keep it up!

This is Kodak Vision 50D from Cinestill. I also have the medium format version but haven't used it yet.
(Im glad you dig my IG)

28652331585_17bff1f359_o.thumb.jpg.d5ff01769ae14d7ddea7cea601ab3ef6.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My involvement with movie / stills (even as an amateur till this day) is (I think) kind of interesting.

I love music (more in the past - free time is shorter to enjoy it each day that passes), love to go to concerts, but...my memory is kind of weak, a lot of moments in concerts end being forgotten. Hence I had the idea to film parts of the concerts as a way to remember. It was a time that smartphones are the Samsung's with Tizen, Android did not even exist yet, and I bought a Kodak Zi8 - a little film camera, fixed lens, with 1080p (a rarity in those days). And started to record some shows.

Soon I upgraded to a Sony HX9, much better quality and sound. And with it, tried to start to take some stills - and liked it. Than start to search for a camera that could make good movies and stills, Google mentioned a camera called GH2, I found a site called EOSHD, which owner made a video in Tokyo with that camera that blowns me away...and the rest is history.

Video brought me the stills, and I love both. It gives you that kind of satisfaction from a thing that was created, and done, only by you, a sense of accomplishment. As I guy that likes art, it is the closest that I can get to it.

But I think that my stills side in much better. :) All photos with m4/3 cameras, "which sucks for concerts, you need a full frame one". The second one was published in the Franz Ferdinand's Instagram account, good moment.

14011394062_d0f00dc183_c.jpg

15432809225_3688653e70_c.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Axel said:

Applicable to video as well. Imagine you have an expensive roll of film in your camera, just a few minutes. Imagine you could not immediately check the recording. Wouldn't this sharpen your senses? 

I completely agree. Limitations in general can be helpful in the creative process.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always been a bit envious of all of you who do such gorgeous videos while out wandering but I always think stills except when I'm either writing or shooting a script. I love trying to catch the right moment with a single click. Here are three of my favorites (out of the ones I have on flickr). First two are from a 2016 trip to Boston with the NX500 and the last one is from a while back with the Panasonic FZ28 at Venice Beach. 

Boston aSAM_0983 Labor Day 2009

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 20.2.2018 at 1:51 PM, Mattias Burling said:

Another huge reason that pushed me towards stills was also the ability to shoot film every single day without spending much money.
[...]
And it also opens up the door to very affordable medium and even large format.

It's intoxicating :)

I'm shooting the Nikon F5 for months now - very intensively. My conclusion: IQ wise, nothing you could NOT get with a modern digital camera. It's more the pleasure and the hype than rational reasons - at least when speaking of APSC / FF. And it's about deceleration of a photographers work. Putting reflection, lighting and composition in the center of our work. At least in my eyes...

"Discovery" and promotion of an alleged outdated technique is common nowadays, as people are oversaturated and bored with permanent new camera releases and latest specs and bells & whistles. So - in my eyes and experience - a nice entertainment claiming "mojo of old film". The truth is, there is no special mojo when it comes to image output of film photography. Nothing a skilled person could not do quite fast when post processing digital images.

For myself, I'll put my F5 back in the shelf and spend my time on keeping improving my Photoshop skills, when it comes to making and post processing photographs.

And I am not the only one coming to this conclusion: https://petapixel.com/2018/02/22/film-vs-digital-can-tell-difference/

Thanks for sharing your thoughts!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The thing is, by shooting on film I don't need to be 'extremely skilled' or spend any time at all to get the look I want. Plus I get all the fun of developing my own films, with the artisinal satisfaction that it gives me. I wouldn't use film for most paid jobs, I hasten to add - my cameras are old and cheap and I wouldn't want to rely on them if I absolutely have to get the shot. But for personal work I'm finding that 7 times out of 10 I'm plumping for analogue.

And, as Mattias says, and as I mentioned previously WRT one of his images - there's a particular quality, especially to out-of-focus areas, that film gives that I have never, ever, seen fully mimicked digitally. I've seen lots of digital files that look like analogue, but I've got lots of analogue images that could be nothing else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...