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Removing internal battery resets EOS R5 overheat timer


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Let's be honest, these stupid workarounds are not practical on set. It is up to Canon to fix the damn camera, not us. We paid the money, and not a small amount. Unscrewing the back, pro

I am absolutely not saying that someone who had an R5 could use a good old fashioned CR2032 battery eliminator in the camera then bring it out through the camera enabling them to provide a switchable

"Math Class" on Baidu now has extensive infrared thermometer readings of the camera's mainboard with the back off, showing they correspond closely to the temperature reported in the EXIF data and don'

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He definitely needs to toe the line when it comes to stating possible reason why.  I am surprised that many in that thread still didn't believe there was proof of a software timer.  At least Roger was very clear on that.

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Canon has set a timer in EPROM. Where else would they write it? That was pretty obvious when we realized there was a software timer. We already knew taking out the internal battery (there are some other methods) erases EPROM.

The only questions are why and whether Canon will do something about it.

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1 hour ago, DanielDarsie said:

turn the R5 clock back and see if overheating resets

We tried this via the Wifi App by @BTM_Pix

It just changes the data and time, it does not reset the separate clock used to measure the camera up-time.

I can confirm Magic Lantern are looking into it.

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5 hours ago, John Matthews said:

Has anyone considered the idea that Canon might have wanted to release the full potential of this camera at a later point? The argument could be made they wanted to own the entire "spec" buying videographer market, knowing Sony or someone else would have made something to compete that would be up to snuff to compete (again, in terms of specs). At this point, they'd release a new firmware "unlocking" the full potential on us unsuspecting customers. Both Fuji and Olympus have done this type of thing in the past, only with firmware.

Yes, if this is so, it went horribly wrong for Canon.

They already did it in the past too.

image.thumb.png.ffa642da7780c13da59b5d2fe0bb13b9.png

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1 hour ago, Andrew Reid said:

Let's be honest, these stupid workarounds are not practical on set.

It is up to Canon to fix the damn camera, not us.

We paid the money, and not a small amount.

Unscrewing the back, prodding the card door sensor, ripping the clock battery out... None of it is acceptable for $4000

It wouldn't be acceptable for $200!

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6 minutes ago, Emanuel said:

They already did it in the past too.

Ah yes... we finally have "M" mode! That was probably a big deal. I was still shooting video on my Canon ZR930 Camcorder. I guess we know why @Andrew Reid had the "EOSHD" name. Not sure if would make sense today, but it probably seemed like a good idea a decade ago. Then again, we're still talking about Canon, aren't we? Same old shenanigans... What is it? "You can lead a horse to water, but you can't force it to drink." Canon know what to do to stay relevant, but will they do it? And when?

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11 hours ago, TsK said:

Its there so that the camera remembers things such as time and date (and the clock keeps on running) even when the camera has no battery. Without any power it’d forget those things. 

My Early DSLRs had those batteries (they were easy to access and user replaceable) but  I thought they were a thing of the past.

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It's interesting how a simple Google search returns loads of articles where you can read about how 64.7C (aka 148F) is rather hot for a laptop and almost reaches heavy load levels even when using gaming PC. Computers with fans running are at a heavy load rating when the CPU is past 64.7C. Thats COMPUTERS, not laptops as you claim in your article, WITH FANS, which even laptops have so they don't overheat. But this camera doesn't have a fan, which you have well documented, but that doesn't make you an expert on computers. Canon is right, your whole account is just a huge excuse to bash Canon, and the only fake overheating is coming from you. 

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4 hours ago, ajay said:

Possible work-around from removing the button battery?

Horshack on the DP thread thinks that you can trick the camera by overriding the battery door switch and pulling out the battery. This prevents the camera from going into a normal shut-down and it loses its settings.

Something to try Andrew?

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64283375

Just tried this as well.

It does forget the aperture because it didn't write it to NVRAM in time if you pull the battery quite quickly - I tried after about 10 seconds, with the battery door open and a small screw lodged in the pin to force the camera into ON state even with door open.

Screenshot-2020-08-21-at-19.45.17.jpg

It does not forget the timers

That seems to work off a separate clock to the main date / time and is constantly ticking away like a quartz powered by the button cell.

One solution I wish the Chinese guy had tried is to permanently remove the internal battery and see if the recovery timer is reset every time you reboot without it.

It would be annoying to be kept asking to input date and time on every startup though.

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1 hour ago, canon5dsquared said:

It's interesting how a simple Google search returns loads of articles where you can read about how 64.7C (aka 148F) is rather hot for a laptop and almost reaches heavy load levels even when using gaming PC. Computers with fans running are at a heavy load rating when the CPU is past 64.7C. Thats COMPUTERS, not laptops as you claim in your article, WITH FANS, which even laptops have so they don't overheat. But this camera doesn't have a fan, which you have well documented, but that doesn't make you an expert on computers. Canon is right, your whole account is just a huge excuse to bash Canon, and the only fake overheating is coming from you. 

You are talking informed armchair shite.

YOU have not taken a single shot with YOUR EOS R5 and reported anything here of value.

YOU have not taken the back off like some people, and even measured internal temps with an infrared thermometer.

A heavy load for an Intel CPU is 90C. I have a laptop that registers even 95C during rendering. If the CPU goes above this it will throttle to maintain 90C-95C. Only if the temperature carries on rising, is it a risk. 90C is fine. Fans and heatsinks in a PC are only there to maintain stable temperatures - to dissipate heat - for very hot running components that use a lot of energy. A smartphone does not have a fan, as the energy consumption is lower and efficiency far higher - these kind of CPUs are RISC as is the ARM based CPU in the EOS R5 and R6.

The EOS R5 maintains a stable temperature below 65C in all video modes - this is not conjecture, it shows in the PCB temperature sensor and EXIF metadata, infrared thermometer tests, and just plain old application of common sense. If the EOS R5 can run at "heavy load" in 8K for 10 mins... what's so special about the 20 min point at same temperature that it has to shut off... Nothing. It's a timer. And the recovery times are even more artificial.

If your laptop can render 8K for 20 mins at 65C it means the temps are stable and plateau at a comfortable level. Same with a camera CPU.

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4 minutes ago, Andrew Reid said:

You are talking informed armchair shite.

His point is moot anyway because the 65C temps return to normal in 2-3 minutes and not hours like the cripple timer would lead you to believe.

If it was 8K recording for 20 mins and then a 5 min cool down before another round of 8K then that’s fine.

If the cool down timer actual was based off internal temperature that would be fine. It’s not. It seems completely artificial and arguably an excessive cripple. 

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41 minutes ago, Andrew Reid said:

Just tried this as well.

It does forget the aperture because it didn't write it to NVRAM in time if you pull the battery quite quickly - I tried after about 10 seconds, with the battery door open and a small screw lodged in the pin to force the camera into ON state even with door open.

It does not forget the timers

That seems to work off a separate clock to the main date / time and is constantly ticking away like a quartz powered by the button cell.

One solution I wish the Chinese guy had tried is to permanently remove the internal battery and see if the recovery timer is reset every time you reboot without it.

It would be annoying to be kept asking to input date and time on every startup though.

Also, even if pulling out the battery backup works, it would be annoying to have to turn the camera off, and back on again, every 20 minutes to reset the cripple clock...and then on top of that have to re-enter the date and time/zone every time like it was a first time setup of the camera (not to mention it would forget all of your custom settings).

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