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User last won the day on March 11 2018

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  1. When I heard that the previous 5 iterations of Trump had either been assassinated or suffered catastrophic logic board failures while at McDonald's, it made me angry. I wanted to know who designed those logic boards? No wonder this version is eyeballin' an Apple facility. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/09/opinion/a-ticket-to-hell.html
  2. Not so fast there cowboy, what if it's a 'supermoon?' It'll be fun trying to enlighten telephoto lens buffs that 'compression' is what happens when they train any lens on anything. I guess it makes sense somehow... but. "I compressed some perspective and AoV while on vacation."
  3. - I found myself scratching my head on this: "If you use the same perspective (camera postion) and same AoV on two different sensor sizes, you'll have the same compression. Compression is not an attribute of the sensor size, but a description of how a filmmaker sets up a shot (like: do we back up with a narrower AoV or go closer with a wider one)." I though compression was something achieved through the use of telephoto lenses, where the foreground and background distance was compressed via lens magnification. Hmmm.
  4. I have little interest in working on or seeing films that repeat tired narratives. Maybe it's the same for you? This gem puts a wonderful spin on films about workers and factories: See you in the smelter
  5. Last year I met a burned out Western cinematographer spending time at a monastery in Dharamshala. One evening, as he walked through the garden, he tripped over a Arri 65 that a foreign crew had forgotten there while doing a piece with the Dali Lama. Seeing the man fall, several novice monks moved to help set him upon his feet again. Once there, he thanked the novice monks and began to marvel over the Arri. He was reminded of his days as a top globe-trotting dop and proceeded at length to describe the inherent nature of the large format sensor to the young and curious monks. Field of View, spacial relationships, shallow dof and circles of confusion filled the garden air. As the man finished there was a pause, and the youngest of the monks stepped forward and in a soft voice asked, "How will all this make us happy?" Last I heard, the man had left he monastery and was back in L.A. Working at a camera rental office. ?
  6. Oh great, now I feel like a bit of a bozo for posting this nonsense... One thing for sure is that the skilled folks who do have access to these limited and expensive cameras, went ahead with them for a reason. Somehow I'm willing to bet it was more than just urban legends... now where is my snorkel? ?
  7. - I'm really not the best person to comment on this, but if I had to take a stab, it's as simple as having the extra sensor size and the field of view it affords. Na? .... well then that certainly sells it all the more. See you there...
  8. From the article: "In other words, the large format allows you to see wider, without going wider." “A camera three feet away from him, which also has a real psychological effect of connecting you to a character and feeling that sense of intimacy, but now we didn’t need to shoot it on a 21mm or a 24mm.” “You get a sense of the environment, but you’ve isolated him in that environment with this shallower depth of field.” the relationship of foreground and background, or a character and the world around them. very interesting compromise between depth of field and size of the frame,” background and foreground appearing closer together. “You could get these beautiful vistas, but not making things feel like they’re super far away,” “You have the same sort of presence of being, of seeing like you’re in a close up of someone, but now you also see much more expression, and much more of the physical performance someone is giving,” “So it just feels like you’re really close in a moment with a character, within the character’s space, in a way more traditionally we would be seeing just less of the performance. It’s like you kind of get this sort of intimate close up feeling, when watching a scene with a 50mm lens, but now we’re seeing much more of that person. That performance and how the character is framed in their space is just different, in a way that’s almost trippy at first.” If I 'get out' it'll be to a small island in Micronesia At the end of the day, it's more about narrative for me and I absolutely want 'proper' video camera that helps me get the film shot, so this most probably puts me in the 35mm sensor space. Recently I saw Honeyland, it was shot on on a couple of Nikon dslrs and has done quite well as a 'story'. Worth a watch. Alrighty... back to the front...
  9. Some insightful info here laid out in plain English with good examples: https://www.indiewire.com/feature/large-format-cameras-arri-alexa-65-film-language-joker-roma-midsommar-1202179944/?fbclid=IwAR2fUA2vrI9dvj50_-mMrLFtEqdEt0eMb3azO2qu_8DjimOtDQWDLIo3J4M On a personal note, I'm in the edit on a doc with mixed footage... 1/2 inch, 35mm and full frame. Recently I've been back to making selections from the full frame (5DMkII) footage and when the conditions are right, it can really 'stand apart' from the others and I'm not talking shallow dof. More spacial relationships. That Arri 65 must really be a god king. Anyway.
  10. User

    Music videos...

    3000 images, razor blades not included
  11. DPAF ok. But what about an important practical aid like focus peeking? Any info on audio?
  12. Just found and heading into this:
  13. Yes 12k is coming. And the first one off the production line has been marked to shoot part two of this with even greater peace of mind and clarity:
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