Jump to content

Fuji X-H2 - They can't decide whether to cancel it... Or?


Andrew Reid
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Administrators

The X-H1 was nigh on perfect, Fuji should just put the X-T3 sensor & 10bit in it and get it out the door. I don't see the need for any complete re-imagining to be honest, although some sort of electronically variable ND glass over the sensor would be nice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super Members
31 minutes ago, rainbowmerlin said:

I'm wondering Andrew if the above quote was a typo on FujiRumors? From the context of the interview, it would logically make more narrative sense for it to be 'does not make it IMpossible' for them to co-exist.

The original page with the quote is here.

Google translates it exactly as FujiRumors prints it.

"First of all, the XH series is not only characterized by camera shake correction, but it is made very tough, such as increasing the affinity with the telephoto lens with a large grip, increasing the thickness of magnesium and increasing the rigidity and robustness of the body Camera. As a result, the size and weight will increase compared to other models, but after all professional quality and what seems to be over quality to maintain high specifications, such a camera Is necessary. The X-Series offers a lineup of cameras that have the same characteristics, while maintaining the same image quality, according to the shooting scene and style. Therefore, we would like to make the XH series a camera with a clearly different concept from the XT series. It is intended for users who have different shooting purposes and shooting scenes, including the video function. The mere difference in design and operability does not make it possible for the two series to coexist. We are currently studying these issues, and we hope you will have some more time."

The context would be akin to something like the Nikon dF and D4 for example with the same sensor and image processor but completely different target applications which mean they have to be separate independent products.

https://news.mapcamera.com/maptimes/【fujifilm】x-t4-インタビュー-vol-3/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrators

The X-H1 seems to be £699 brand new at the moment and I don't see how Fuji make any money at that price. It's such a well built and high-spec camera. The shutter mechanism alone is one of the most advanced mechanical designs in any modern camera on the market. If I were them, I'd have released the X-H2 already and bumped the price back up, getting shot of the old one. I thought it might have been discontinued at one stage, but I think they are still making them and sales seem ok?

I'd argue with Fuji that the difference in design and operability alone does allow it to coexist quite happily!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Video Hummus said:

A C100mk3 with 10-bit internal, clog, a decent screen, and 14 stops of DR and DPAF in all modes would do so well. No fuss, beautiful colors straight out of camera.

Would you get the C100mk3 at the same price as the C100mk2 was at launch if the mk3 only has at max 2K resolution?

As I can't see Canon releasing a cheap cinema camera in 2020 with 4K 10bit without some major "gotcha"! (ditching DPAF complete?? Not only no SDI, not even full size HDMI?? Who knows)

  

18 hours ago, Kisaha said:

It is a matter of things, first of all it is a bit more expensive to rent than the C100mkII, the competition is very aggressive by very young people so the budget is undercut already, and finally they go, instead of rent at all, and waste some time to go pick up equipment and the such, let's use what we have in the office.

Also, the C200 is a bigger camera than the C100, fully build, it is like building a 3 level building, not very convenient, while we had the C100mkII almost always ready to shoot. To make a very competitive "smaller" video camera is easier today than 5 years ago, it is not by chance that so many voices on social media and forums talk for an XC10 type of cheap video camera. That is vey doable, and such a pity BlackMagic missed a strike by using such a weird design on their own Pocket cameras.

Seems the #1 reason is the costs and that you don't have a C200 in house ready at hand. 

As for C200 being bigger, B&H say they both weigh the same? (sorry, been a long loooong time since I was last on set with a C100, they're becoming rare, so I'm a bit forgetful what it's weight/size was like in person)
And I do like the C200's screen being more flexible in its positioning, thought that was a weakness of the C100. 
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think Fuji would do really well if they made a mini cinema camera (XC-15 or a bit smaller than C100) with a Super35 sensor since they have so many lenses for APS-C, people love their color science, they produce a great image with X-H1/T3/T4, etc. 

And, since they have no upper cinema camera to protect, they could put whatever they want into it, even some things that other manufacturers won't do at this price range, like internal raw (outside of Black Magic) and IBIS (though I know "cinema people" will complain, many many many people want it, especially on the lower end of the market (under $5k). And it's gotta have NDs and some sort of dual-XLR solution. 

I'd be very intrigued then. 
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, IronFilm said:

Seems the #1 reason is the costs and that you don't have a C200 in house ready at hand. 

As for C200 being bigger, B&H say they both weigh the same? (sorry, been a long loooong time since I was last on set with a C100, they're becoming rare, so I'm a bit forgetful what it's weight/size was like in person)
And I do like the C200's screen being more flexible in its positioning, thought that was a weakness of the C100. 
 

Cheapest C200 cost is 7.050euros here.

To rent C100mkII is still 90euros per day, C200 is 150 (C300ii 200 by the way, the new Sony 250).

The rent house, which is the cheaperst and probably have the nicest people running it, is 1-2 hours away with heavy heavy traffic from our base and our homes, so there is no easy way to go get the equipment, so you need too much time to go get the equipment and take that back, so that is significant too. If we leave for a 2 or 3 day shooting, we go the previous day before the trip, but for 8-10hours internet stuff, we just can't bother. 

If you rent the camera, we rent a bigger tripod also, probably lenses and other things, so the cost rises proportionally, so they throw us the 5D, a set of L lenses some Sachtler Ace and the guy from the company brings everything on set, together with lighting (they are specialized in lighting mostly) and I get my sound equipment and maybe an Edelkrone or something extra (which I am not getting paid for that anyway, so I try to bring as less as possible!).

Every day of shooting, I was preparing the C100mkII on a shoulder camera bag, and it was ready for the whole day, C300 does NOT fit on a shoulder camera bag - or I wouldn't recomend it - and I have to make and break it the whole day, if it is 1 location, that's great, but usally we do a lot of Km per day on different locations. 

Usually we use a 7" monitor for director/clients/dP, but yes, the screen of the C100mkII was really terrible, not so in position - I liked it there personally - but in brightness.

An XC10 body, or a slightly smaller C100 body, with 4K 60p 10bit, 120frames 1080p would be sufficient for almost everything I do and I use a camera for. For bigger jobs I am usually the sound man, so I do not care about cameras there at all. 2ch inputs, even with mini XLRs and internal ND is all I need! 

The Pocket4K stays anyway. I wanted it so much to be that camera, but after so much money I have spent (cages, Tilta Nucleus, adapters, external batteries, media) still it is not a C100mkII replacer. The best I can do is just the camera and the 12-100 Olympus, but then there are so many other issues every time. I still get my NX cameras most of the time to be honest.

It is the only logical think for Fuji, they are already too late in the game, they do not have anything to worry about, especially when a cheap-ish video/cine camera can increase the sales of their other cameras too, if one wants one system for photos to video, and 2-3 similar cameras for multicam. At minimum I want to have a specialized video camera, a good pro hybrid and a smaller one for everyday use, but good enough to be a 3rd or 4th option, or as a back up just in case (something like the XT-30 probably). They can make a few more zooms, like the Canon ones at 18-80, 70-200, or an 16-80 and even a wider one, and sell them for a few thousand dollars, and still there is a big market for them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

DeepL with its scarily good machine translation AI (which isn't know yet to most American website operators like FujiRumors since it's a European website) probably renders the original Japanese interview better:

Quote

 

"It has a classic, small body that resembles a film camera, a film simulation that has been praised for its "wonderful photographic colors," and high functionality and high performance that incorporates advanced mirrorless technology. The latest model in Fujifilm's X-T series, the X-T4, which is the driving force behind mirrorless cameras, has finally been announced. We interviewed Mr. Ueno of FUJIFILM Corporation to find out more about its appeal. Please take a look at some of the interesting stories about the X-T4 and the X-H series!

FUJIFILM X-T4 Interview
Following the popular "X-Pro2 Interview", "GFX 50S Interview", and "GFX 50R Interview", we would like to talk about the new product "X-T4" in this issue. I look forward to working with you. When I heard that the X-T4 was going to be announced, I'm sure many users were excited and wondered why the sensor and processor hadn't been redesigned. With this in mind, can you tell us about the appeal of this machine?

Ueno: First of all, we felt that there was no need to renew the sensor and processor in the roughly one and a half years since the X-T3's launch. It's true that the sensor and processor are devices that users are looking forward to and paying attention to, so we want to make a major evolution (renewal) when we make changes so that we can live up to those expectations. However, if you want to do that, you still need a certain amount of development time. More to the point, we don't think our fourth-generation devices are capable enough to need a renewal in just a year and a half. That's why, when we started planning the X-T4, we decided to keep the current fourth-generation sensor and processor.

Many people have asked me if the X-T3's performance was changed because it was no longer able to meet the demands of modern performance. That's not the case. The X-T3 is one of the fastest-selling models in the X-T series, and it still has enough performance to play an active role in the front line of photography. Under these circumstances, many X users asked for an in-body image stabilization mechanism. The X-H1 was equipped with the technology, but the X-T3, which came out later, didn't, so users were wondering why we didn't include it in the X-T3. Of course, there were a number of reasons for this, but in any case, when we started planning the X-T4, we had decided to include an image stabilization mechanism as an evolutionary element that we couldn't miss.

Some people have suggested that the name "X-T3s" would be fine, but we don't think it's a model change without changing the main device. It's true that changing these things would be a major model change, but that's not the whole story of camera evolution, and as I mentioned earlier, the X-Processor4 currently equipped with the camera still has a lot of potential, and we knew that if we spent more time and money on development, there would be a lot of new things we could do. The new X-T4 is capable of creating extremely elaborate video expressions such as ultra-slow motion shooting at 240fps and bleach bypass. The 26-megapixel X-Trans CMOS IV sensor is also highly regarded by professional photographers for its excellent balance between high resolution and high sensitivity, so we decided to continue using the X-Processor 4.

The sensor and processor in the X-T3 are indeed very high performance, so I guess it's fair to say that the X-T3 has been tuned for higher performance. Now, let's talk about "image stabilization," which is the focus of the X-T4 that you just mentioned.

Ueno: In the case of landscape photography, for example, I've heard that there are more places where tripods are prohibited these days, and the need for image stabilization is increasing for a variety of reasons. If you can take pictures without image stabilization, there's nothing wrong with that, but as long as the effects on power consumption, camera size, weight, and image quality are small and within an acceptable range, of course there's nothing wrong with installing it. When we released the X-H1, we anticipated that it would be larger in size and weight to some extent, so we developed it with the concept of making the body and grip larger, but not compromising on image quality. The X-H1 was our first camera with in-body image stabilization, so we took great care in making it, and as a result, we ended up with the body size and weight that we wanted. The X-H1 was designed to be chosen by people who wanted its excellent image stabilization and ease of use, so I think that's a good thing. The X-T series is our flagship model, and I think its feature and greatest appeal is the high functionality of its flagship model in a compact and lightweight body. The X-H series would have been created if it hadn't been for its small size and light weight. In our opinion, the X-H series will continue to be a different concept from the T series, so we had to differentiate ourselves from the rest.

The X-T series has to be exactly like the X-T, so we've developed and installed a completely new image stabilization unit. Fortunately, I was working on a huge in-body image stabilization system called the GFX100, so I had a lot of know-how and knowledge. This is the third device we've developed for the X-T4, and with this experience, we've come to the conclusion that we can downsize the X-T4 without sacrificing performance. One of the reasons why we didn't include image stabilization in the X-T3 was because we hadn't yet developed an image stabilization that would be suitable for the X-T. Although the X-T4 is approximately 2.5mm thicker, I believe that we were able to implement image stabilization that is appropriate for the X-T series without compromising the functions and concept of the camera.

In terms of needs, it can be said that the camera is equipped with image stabilization in consideration of the needs of video shooters. Recently, the movie function of a mirrorless camera has been effectively used by professionals, and it is now possible to take movies that could only be taken with a dedicated cinema camera. The X-T3 also features 4K60p 10bit 4:2:2 external recording and 10bit 4:2:0 in-camera recording, making it possible to shoot video like a full-fledged cinema camera. With the T3, you can either use an OIS-equipped lens or use a gimbal to shoot handheld while reducing camera shake, but some users said it would be better if you could shoot simply without using a gimbal. What could make that happen? Considering that, there is no other way but in-body image stabilization. Considering these needs, I felt that image stabilization is more necessary than still photography.

In addition to a maximum mechanical shutter speed of 15 frames per second, the X-T4's shutter durability has also been significantly improved. However, I don't seem to have an image of a camera with a super-telephoto lens that can take pictures of moving objects. What are your thoughts on that?

Mr. Ueno: As you say, I think it's a preconceived notion or image. Even the X-T3 has considerable AF-following performance for mirrorless cameras, but in the AF-following tests of camera magazines, it was written that the X-T3 was the one with unexpectedly high performance. We don't think it's totally unexpected (laughs).

One thing that still lingers is the fact that when the X-Pro1 was released, there was only contrast AF, and the first XF35mm F1.4R released had a 100g or more focus lens unit driven by a DC motor, so AF was slow. At the time, there was no way I could move the AF faster. I think that's partly because of this, and partly because many people thought that "it doesn't fit with moving objects" or "the AF is slow" = the X series had a big impact. Especially from people who have not used the X series since the early models, I think they still say, "The image quality of the X is good, but the AF is slow.

The phase detection AF in the X-T3, X-T4, and X-Pro3 cameras covers 100% of the area of the image sensor. The Pro3 and T4 also have low brightness performance, which can be up to -6EV. With each new camera model change, image quality and features improve, but in fact, it is the AF performance that has evolved the most since the X series was introduced. That's quite a jump up, too. So, when I asked people to use the new X series, they were surprised and said, "It fits surprisingly well! I've been told, "I'm going to do this. It's not at all surprising to us, but...

Even if the shutter and other mechanical parts are improved, there's no point in not having AF on the X-T4, so we developed the X-T4's AF to be even more accurate, and its response to objects coming straight at you is excellent.

And, as is true of all X-Series cameras, the face and pupil AF features are also constantly being researched and fed back to the products to see how we can improve the accuracy of these features whenever a new model is released. In that sense, the AF performance of the X-T3, X-T30, X-Pro3, and X-T4 has been getting better and better in just one and a half years.


When it was mentioned that the X-T4 would be equipped with image stabilization, I wondered if there would be a successor to the X-H series. Rumor has been spreading on the net that [...] However, when you mentioned earlier, you said that you would continue to work on X-H. I think this is a point that a lot of people are concerned about, so let me ask you a few more questions.

Mr. Ueno: That's right. First of all, the X-H series does not only feature image stabilization, but also a large grip to improve the combination with telephoto lenses and a thicker magnesium body to increase the rigidity and robustness of the body, making it an extremely tough camera. The X series offers a range of cameras with different features to suit different shooting situations and styles, while maintaining the same image quality. That's why we want the X-H series to be a camera with a distinctly different concept than the X-T series. The camera is intended for users with different shooting purposes and scenes, including video functions. There is no point in having the two series coexist if they are simply different in design and operation. We are currently looking into this and other matters, so please give us a little more time.


Please let us know if there are any plans to retrofit some of the functions of the X-T4 to the X-T3, which is equipped with the same sensor and processor.

Mr. Ueno: That's something we're looking into now. Certainly it's physically possible to put new features on existing models as long as the main devices are the same. However, the firmware itself also undergoes minor changes as the model changes. Therefore, copying the new logic of a new model does not mean that the new features can be used immediately on the existing model. In some cases, a new dedicated firmware has to be developed in order to incorporate functions into existing models. Nowadays, the competition for digital camera sales is very fierce, and there is only so much time and personnel that can be allocated to the development of firmware for existing models while continuing to develop new products. Of course, we understand the expectations of our users, so we'd like to think about the features of each model and which features are best incorporated into existing models.


Finally, please give a message to those who are considering purchasing the X-T4.

Mr. Ueno: In a word, the X-T4 is "Perfect X". It's no exaggeration to say that the X series is the most powerful camera ever made, taking full advantage of the APS-C sensor, the compactness of the system, including not only the body but also the lenses, the overwhelmingly low cost performance of even the highest-grade lenses compared to full-frame cameras with the same specifications, and above all, the excellent color reproduction that Fujifilm is proud of. If you're already using X, I'm sure you'll understand why I don't need to go into detail, so I'd like to encourage people who have never heard of or used X before to use the X-T4.

 

 

Translated with https://www.deepl.com/translator

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, Andrew Reid said:

Back in the 1960's most people consumed films at home on really awful pokey black & white TVs but Kubrick did not decide to downgrade his camera as a result :)

I would say, based on my Dads life, he went to the cinema to watch Kubrick films. The pokey black and white tv was for reruns and the Johnny Carson show.

 

15 hours ago, Kisaha said:

I do not know about the 14 stops thingy though, that seems a bit exaggerated, but I wouldn't mind if it was 13 or 12.5 or whatever!

DR is, in my opinion, the single metric that will improve the image coming out of your camera (there are exceptions of course). S1H ranges from 13.2 to 13.7. That’s a good enough increase from previous gen to make a difference.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Kisaha said:

Cheapest C200 cost is 7.050euros here.

 

That is insane!     I was looking on Ebay for the price of a Xc10 here in Australia and then extended it to look at the C## Canon cameras.

There are not very many here but the prices i found were

XC10 about $1400 to $1900 Australian

C100 $1650 and $1700 Australian

C100 ii $4000 New and $2753 and $3300 used Australian

C200 $8000 Australian ( refurbished)

C300 $2287 Australian (ex rental)

C300 ii $13269 new $11500 used Australian.

the exchange rate is about  .59  Euro = 1 dollar AU so that new C300ii is pretty much just over 7800 Euros.

I thought our prices were ridiculous.

They are just the camera only mostly and would have to add GST probably but still...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, noone said:

That is insane!     I was looking on Ebay for the price of a Xc10 here in Australia and then extended it to look at the C## Canon cameras.

Check Facebook Marketplace as well, took me only two seconds to find a C100 for $1K and a C300mk1 for $2.2K in Sydney. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, BTM_Pix said:

 

Google translates it exactly as FujiRumors prints it.

 The mere difference in design and operability does not make it possible for the two series to coexist. We are currently studying these issues, and we hope you will have some more time."

Hi BTM - yes Patrick at FujiRumors got back to me and made the exact same point, he's just passed on how Google has translated it. I still wonder if Google Translate has struggled if there was a double negative in there (it can be a somewhat crude translation tool) - or alternatively I've simply misunderstood the point that's being made, which is also quite possible! In the absence of a Japanese speaker who can check with the original, we'll have to leave it at that. 

Anyway, regardless of the precise semantic intention underpinning this phrase, the interview taken as a whole (and FujiRumors very strong messages about this for many months now) do seem certain an X-H2 is planned to come out within a year or so.  At least at this point. I suppose they could change their mind, but Patrick doesn't seem to think it at all likely, and he's got a great track record of anticipating Fuji developments. 

The price point/level of video sophistication is an interesting one. I'm assuming they will wait until they have a new sensor  to put in it (otherwise there would be no need to wait so long - they could do as Andrew suggests and just put an X-T3 sensor in a slightly modified X-H1 body and bring that out fairly quickly). But as the X-H2 is I believe intended to be their 'flagship' they won't want to make again the issue they had with the X-H1 of it being superseded by a significantly more advanced sensor in the next X-T update. 

So the X-H2 will have a new sensor, I'm assuming. Fujifilm have the choice of going for a relatively low price point for a cinema camera (£2000 or below) and making it otherwise similar to the X-H1 in where it sits in the market. OR really try and max everything out to go for the best cinema camera they can produce given the new sensor specs, at a still-competitive price point of around £3 to £3.5k perhaps? Built in ND filters, higher-end audio connections etc. Going for a higher-end market. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrators

Key part from the DeepL translation:

"The X series offers a range of cameras with different features to suit different shooting situations and styles, while maintaining the same image quality. That's why we want the X-H series to be a camera with a distinctly different concept than the X-T series. The camera is intended for users with different shooting purposes and scenes, including video functions. There is no point in having the two series coexist if they are simply different in design and operation. We are currently looking into this and other matters, so please give us a little more time."

So it sounds like the models became too similar in features and functionality, and they need more time to differentiate the specs sheets.

It is likely the X-H2 will be a power house, with RAW video, maybe even ProRes, I am sure they are studying each aspect and asking what pros want.

The problem is the pricing... APS-C doesn't really allow much headroom beyond £1500.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, noone said:

That is insane!     I was looking on Ebay for the price of a Xc10 here in Australia and then extended it to look at the C## Canon cameras.

There are not very many here but the prices i found were

XC10 about $1400 to $1900 Australian

C100 $1650 and $1700 Australian

C100 ii $4000 New and $2753 and $3300 used Australian

C200 $8000 Australian ( refurbished)

C300 $2287 Australian (ex rental)

C300 ii $13269 new $11500 used Australian.

the exchange rate is about  .59  Euro = 1 dollar AU so that new C300ii is pretty much just over 7800 Euros.

I thought our prices were ridiculous.

They are just the camera only mostly and would have to add GST probably but still...

1) euro prices are very different, there is the "EU premium" as we say here. The price are full taxed and including VAT, which for my country is 24%.

2) companies do not buy from ebay. Even me, a tiny small dot in the corporate world prefer to buy localy because of tax incentives. I preffered buying my Pocket and most of their accessories locally for those reasons. Same with ALL my EF lenses. My NX lenses are mostly from EU, as I could find a lot better offers back in the day, the difference was huge, so I didn't care much and the warranty was EU anyway. My sound gear is from very specialized shops like Audiosense.be/Boyznoyz.nl and pinknoise.co.uk (a lot before Brexit, now I prefer supporting EU shops), so, no ebay there too.

3) it is huge to have local/European warranty for when you need very fast turn around and no questions asked and the such. 

4) it is a small market, buying locally you are part of the industry and that helps in other ways also (e.g networking)

Prices here from the official seller, which almost everyone buys Canon video/cinema equipment from: 

1D X mkIII = 7.812euros

C500mk II = 20.956

C300mkII = 10.805,36

C200        =    7.050 

C100mkII =  3.286

XC15         = 2.418euros

If I was buying an XC15 or C100, I would probably search buying cheap, or used, but for anything above, I would buy the normal way.

It is very difficult for me to find any of those prices fair in this new market, even if everything is 10% cheaper.

A nice S35 video camera from Fuji, less than SH1 - but more video specialized - price would be amazing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Andrew Reid said:

The problem is the pricing... APS-C doesn't really allow much headroom beyond £1500.

What looks like interesting if APS-C. To top their price range. Which actually is S35, the motion picture production format standard of film cameras for so many decades now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super Members
2 hours ago, Kisaha said:

XC15         = 2.418euros

If I was buying an XC15 or C100, I would probably search buying cheap, or used, but for anything above, I would buy the normal way.

It is very difficult for me to find any of those prices fair in this new market, even if everything is 10% cheaper.

A nice S35 video camera from Fuji, less than SH1 - but more video specialized - price would be amazing.

Speaking of the XC10/15, its interesting that in 2020 where full frame and RAW are now seen as must haves that the five year old 1" sensor fixed slowish lens XC10 still maintains such a relatively high portion of its original selling price on the used market.

Fuji do have the component parts to do a s35 approximation of it and its a product that, judging by how it has held its value, clearly does have the right feature set for a lot of people.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@BTM_Pix because XC is such a brilliant design, maybe not perfect for a lot of us, but there is certainly some market for it. I was reading somewhere a year ago that XC exceeded Canon's predictions. It is a hard sell at this price for 2020 though..

I believe Fuji has everything, and there is more profit in selling a cheap-ish "cine"/video camera than a APS-C camera when full frame photo cameras have the same or similar price tag.

We are still waiting for the new JVC also, I am certain there will be one at some point in 2020 or 2021.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Andrew Reid said:

So it sounds like the models became too similar in features and functionality, and they need more time to differentiate the specs sheets.

It is likely the X-H2 will be a power house, with RAW video, maybe even ProRes, I am sure they are studying each aspect and asking what pros want.

The problem is the pricing... APS-C doesn't really allow much headroom beyond £1500.

I think APS-C does have more headroom when it becomes a compact Super35 video camera, and that's what Fuji should do. Take the space of 10-bit 4k (60-120fps max) Super35 abandoned by Sony and Canon with no real updates to the C100 and FS5 in 5 - 7 years. I still think there is a HUGE gap here. Yes, mirrorless cameras are incredibly powerful and yes you could just get a C200/FS7, but I want the compact size of a C100 or XC-15 + things like internal NDs and XLRs.

A compact $3k - $5k video camera from Fuji would be very successful I think. And then have the XT4 as a B-Cam. Sounds excellent. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...