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GH3 and Image Stabilization

GH3 image stabilization
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#1
Dr. John R. Brinkley

Posted 07 February 2013 - 05:32 PM

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From what I understand the only image stabilization with the GH3 is through the lenses, specifically lenses made by Panasonic. 

 

Assuming this is true, I'm curious how people have fared with the GH3 when using legacy glass and/or non Panasonic lenses in regards to image stabilization.

 

 

 

Just curious what people thought was wise/reasonable in how to maximize a stable image when shooting with the GH3. Obviously a tripod helps but was looking to see if anyone had thoughts on this issue.

 

 

 


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#2
QuickHitRecord

Posted 07 February 2013 - 05:38 PM

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I find that for any lens with a focal length less than 50mm (on Micro Four Thirds), I can operate with a shoulder rig without shake/vibration. It's really only with true handheld, shooting out of a car window, or with some kind of an improvised dolly that I miss stabilization. 



#3
Jenkly

Posted 07 February 2013 - 06:36 PM

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A pistol grip can come in handy if you are in a pinch.  I would honeslty say the stabalization technique isn't much different from the GH2.  I keep a monopod with me at all times since I shoot mainly on legacy lenses.  QuickHitRecord much has it right.  The only time I obtain unusable footage is when the camera's movement is being influenced by the things he listed above.  On windy days while using my monopod I often resort to 60p.  I can grab footage from that that is very usable even when the movements of the camera are sudden and unpredictable.  It is one of the great things about high framerates.



#4
Mirrorkisser

Posted 08 February 2013 - 11:51 AM

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I got myself a cheap steadycam on ebay. It takes a lot of training, but its possible to get at least decent footage with legacy lenses. its called "the hague". Combined with the kitlens you get rocksteady footage walking around. To be honest though, 95% of the time i shoot from a tripod. If you want to use the footage professionaly, i recommend a better steady cam or a good shoulder rig, which costs 10 times as much though at least.

 

For documentary work i do not even mind camera shaking while walking, while at fictional shooting noticing the camera is always a big minus.



#5
Andrew Reid

Posted 08 February 2013 - 12:17 PM

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Nothing I have seen in video mode on any camera can match what the Olympus OM-D E-M5 can do, now even with legacy glass and adapters. It is certainly worth a look for handheld shoots even though the codec sucks and is 30p.

 

I'm not a huge fan of the OIS on Panasonic lenses for video. Sometimes it jumps and the Lumix lenses are a little bit too clinical looking for my tastes. You are far better off stabilising the camera with a shoulder mounted rig.


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#6
Mirrorkisser

Posted 08 February 2013 - 12:39 PM

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@andrew reid

 

Is there a new firmware planned for the olympus? something that introduces 24 or 25p and a higher bitrate?



#7
ronjbase

Posted 09 February 2013 - 02:21 AM

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When the OM-D first came out I ask the local Olympus rep the same question, about the firm ware 30p issue. He said the Olympus powers that be, are aware of this and the professional mirror less would solve all the problems of bad codec and frame rate issues



#8
GravitateMediaGroup

Posted 09 February 2013 - 06:34 AM

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Nothing I have seen in video mode on any camera can match what the Olympus OM-D E-M5 can do, now even with legacy glass and adapters. It is certainly worth a look for handheld shoots even though the codec sucks and is 30p.

 

I'm not a huge fan of the OIS on Panasonic lenses for video. Sometimes it jumps and the Lumix lenses are a little bit too clinical looking for my tastes. You are far better off stabilising the camera with a shoulder mounted rig.

 

I would say the new sony technology, which is about the same as the OM-D, is....pretty much the same, unless it is in fact....the same

 

I would say in the near future it will be "the norm" for most cameras. As for now Olympus better live it up as the pioneers.

But the Panasonic TM700 and 900 had a pretty good built in IS.

 

 

 

From what I understand the only image stabilization with the GH3 is through the lenses, specifically lenses made by Panasonic. 

 

Assuming this is true, I'm curious how people have fared with the GH3 when using legacy glass and/or non Panasonic lenses in regards to image stabilization.

 

 

 

Just curious what people thought was wise/reasonable in how to maximize a stable image when shooting with the GH3. Obviously a tripod helps but was looking to see if anyone had thoughts on this issue.

 

ProDad Mercalli works pretty nice, the better the shot, the better it works.  If you are shooting an earthquake scene, don't waste your time. If you are shooting just a simple pan shot or can get a decently smooth walking shot it should do just the trick.  IMO it works better than warp stabilizer and faster.  



#9
Wit

Posted 16 February 2013 - 06:50 AM

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Should I put the stabilization on the Panasonic lens off when using a rig or tripod?



#10
nahua

Posted 16 February 2013 - 11:56 AM

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Should I put the stabilization on the Panasonic lens off when using a rig or tripod?

 

Yes but it depends on the lens.  You may get "jumps" or "skipping" in the image when doing pans, usually at the end of movement.  It's like when you stop, the IS is still working and overcompensates resulting in a "jump" in the image.  Turn it off and you will get smooth stops.  Just to remember to turn it back on for handheld.



#11
Wit

Posted 20 February 2013 - 07:50 PM

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Yes but it depends on the lens.  You may get "jumps" or "skipping" in the image when doing pans, usually at the end of movement.  It's like when you stop, the IS is still working and overcompensates resulting in a "jump" in the image.  Turn it off and you will get smooth stops.  Just to remember to turn it back on for handheld.

 

Thanxs! I have the Panasonic 14-35 lens .... on or off with this one? 



#12
thescene

Posted 20 February 2013 - 08:40 PM

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I found the battery grip with the GH3 has really helped me keep stable shots when going completely handheld. Even when using my 85mm, I was able to hold it where the shake was decreased as opposed to when I go handheld/85mm and GH2.



#13
Wit

Posted 02 March 2013 - 01:22 PM

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sorry wrong post







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