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Hi, id like some advice if possible please


mikep

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hello,

 

I am looking to get a camera for shooting some video, so i thought i would post a topic. recently i have been a bit slack on keeping up with video camera / dslr news as i have been busy this past year with work and things, so i feel a bit out of touch and a little lost.

 

should i stay with dslr, should i go mirrorless, or whatever, i have honestly no clue.

 

i have a nikon d700 at the moment, which i have used primarily for stills, and now that i need to shoot a few vids, obviously since the d700 has no video function, i need to sell it and get something else.

 

i have a few nice lenses, nikon 50mm, 70-200, 24 1.4, and a schneider 90mm, so i do have some investment in lenses in the f mount, which i guess i could sell to buy into something else, but obviously id probably rather keep my lenses, as it just easier. and id prefer to keep my lenses because i do still need to shoot stills.

 

so, if you were me, what would you do? the options as i see it are:

 

1) sell d700 and buy a d750 or some other nikon body

 

2) sell d700 and lenses and then buy some other system

 

3) keep the d700 for stills and just buy something different altogether for video, a sony a7r, or a g4 or something else (i have no idea tbh)

 

4) sell d700 and get a a7r and an adapter for my lenses ....

 

so, as you can see im in a bit of a pickle with how to proceed, so if you can give me some ideas, that would be great.

 

also just for fun, lets pretend i didnt currently have a d700, or any lenses, and i wanted to buy some stuff for video, if you were going to spend $3000 ish on a new setup for video, what would you choose and why?

 

ps i have some lights already, well, i have some studio strobes that i think can double as constant lighting, so just camera only please.

 

Thanks.

 

ps thanks !!!

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Absolutely keep your Nikon F lenses! Nikon F mount is a great mount, which is easily adaptable to whatever new camera you get. I have most of my lens collection in Nikon F mount. 

 

If I was in your shoes I'd simply get a Nikon D5200 and call it a day. Maybe get a wide angle lens too for it (Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 and Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 is what I have), and/or an external monitor too (a tripod would be handy as well, as I doubt any of yours has fluid head)

 

Getting the D750 is also a good option, but I really think it is a better idea to go with a much cheaper camera (D5200 is going new for just US$399 at the moment) as you're just starting out with video then in a year or two pick up a better one. (as technology improves so fast, and prices come down so quick) Plus the D5200 is a very fine camera (I am using it professionally at the moment for video work):

http://www.eoshd.com/2013/02/nikon-d5200-vs-canon-5d-mark-iii/

http://www.eoshd.com/2013/02/nikon-d5200-review/

http://rungunshoot.com/nikon-d5200-studio-and-documentary-footage/

 

A couple of other options to consider, is the Sony A5100 or A6000 (I just picked up a near new A5100 for just US$330! Thank you Black Friday!).

http://www.eoshd.com/2014/04/surprise-sony-alpha-a6000-video-mode-huge-improvement/

 

 

Or Sony A7s or Panasonic GH4 (which are the top two at the moment, well and maybe the NX1), but again as I said earlier because this is your first video camera I'd go with something cheaper.

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Guest Ebrahim Saadawi

Agree. Get a D5300 and start shooting beautiful video. Great camera for video and stills and will probably be more than enough. The other more costly answer is sell the D700 and get a D750. This will have the advantage of carrying only one body, and gives you better stills (vs d700) and better video vs the D5300 (full frame video aesthetic, better lowlight performance). If you can carry two bodies the D5300 is great.

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Agree. Get a D5300 and start shooting beautiful video. Great camera for video and stills and will probably be more than enough. The other more costly answer is sell the D700 and get a D750. This will have the advantage of carrying only one body, and gives you better stills (vs d700) and better video vs the D5300 (full frame video aesthetic, better lowlight performance). If you can carry two bodies the D5300 is great.

 

Great advice, great cameras..

 

Keep in mind one day (next year hopefully!) Nikon will I guess release a camera with 4k onboard, think if thats something that will make you regret your decision now..

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Keep in mind one day (next year hopefully!) Nikon will I guess release a camera with 4k onboard, think if thats something that will make you regret your decision now..

Yup, the video world is changing so very fast that I would recommend a person just starting out spends a minimal amount. So get a D5200. Then later on down the track when you're more experienced you'll have a clearer idea of what *you* want, and by then technology will have moved on a lot further (so don't waste thousands right now). 

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Guest Ebrahim Saadawi

One of the worst times to invest in expensive camera gear is before a full transition from SD to HD or HD to 4K. And one of the best times is just after the transition occurs.

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