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Andrew Reid

Panasonic GH4 user films, tests, reviews and opinions

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Hello all,

 

First time poster here, and am inquiring about an issue I'm having with my Panasonic GH4. I just got this camera yesterday and love everything about it so far. The clarity, sharpness, 4K image quality, slow-mo, etc. It's a fantastic camera.

 

Unfortunately, however, I'm getting some mushy / jello footage every now and then when filming at long distances. I attached a private Vimeo video with examples. 

 

I don't know if it's a lens issue, card issue, or what? It's frustrating, because it's not noticeable until I watch the footage on my computer. The shot with the doe and two fawns I was particularly excited about, but obviously it's not usable. I'm shooting with a Panasonic Lumix G 14-140 lens and the mushy shots are all at full zoom.

 

What's confusing and frustrating is it doesn't do it every shot. Note the first two clips are mushy, yet the third clip of the buck in the field is not. The image is shaky, but that's because I was hand holding it. Strangely, the first two shots were on a tripod. 

 

https://vimeo.com/102292597

 

password: jello4k

 

I appreciate everyone's help and response.

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EOSHD Pro Color for Sony cameras EOSHD Pro LOG for Sony CamerasEOSHD C-LOG and Film Profiles for All Canon DSLRs


 

Unfortunately, however, I'm getting some mushy / jello footage every now and then when filming at long distances. I attached a private Vimeo video with examples. 

 


 

 

You left out a bunch of information.  My answer is pure conjecture.

 

I don't own the GH4 and I have never used one.  But what you seem to have there is garden variety camera shake while using a CMOS camera with a telephoto lens.

 

We need to know what focal lenght you were using (roughly).  What kind of external stabilization you were using (ie tripod, monopod, hand held).  We even need to know what the stabilization was made out of ($800 graphite tripod or cheapy $50 plastic big box store tripod).  Also was there wind?

 

If you use a long lens it will amplify the smallest vibrations in the image.  And with a rolling shutter CMOS you will get jello.  I don't care if it is a Canon 5D mk III or a T3i.  If you use a long lens bolt that thing to a sturdy tripod.  The best would be a large expensive wooden tripod.  They don't sway as easily in the wind and the wood dampens vibrations vs transmitting them efficiently like metal.

 

Also use the tripod correctly.  Don't extend the center column excessively... or really at all.  Get a set of sticks (legs) that are talll enough without excessive center column extension.

 

Here is an older article about photography tripods.

 

http://www.bythom.com/support.htm

 

Obviously you will have to get a newer source to find out about the current market and you will need some video centric resources to learn about fluid heads and so forth.

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Some grading tests with Kinoluts I did over the last few weeks. Also this is my first post here and im also inquiring about a little issue. My GH4 tends to randomly display the "Lens attachment failed" error. This often happens during zooming in and out. I already tried to clean the contacts, but that didnt help either. Anybody had such issues before?

 

I'm really trying to avoid sending the unit in for refurbishment. I hope there's another solution for this. 

 

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I have a question about lenses if I was to get the GH4.

 

Would I be better off investing in full frame manual lenses (with manual aperture) for filming with this camera? So I'd still be able to use my lenses with any other camera that might come along.

 

For example, I could get the Samyang/Rokinon cine lens kit for Canon EF (I've got a Canon already that's why), get a simple adapter and get started - ? I'm looking for some old Zeiss glass actually but the idea stays the same as long as the focus and aperture control are manual.

 

Are there any disadvantages or risks to that approach?

 

For photography, I would get a native lens with autofocus as that's just much easier, like the 12-35. 

 

Sorry to quote myself here but does anyone have any suggestions/advice for me? Much appreciated

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Sorry to quote myself here but does anyone have any suggestions/advice for me? Much appreciated

The answer to your questions depends entirely on your aesthetic preferences and uses of your equipment. For example, I use my gear for planned shoots and so have a rig and several constant aperture Nikon-mount zoom lenses. I really believe people should buy what they need.. not what will sell better in future.

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The answer to your questions depends entirely on your aesthetic preferences and uses of your equipment. For example, I use my gear for planned shoots and so have a rig and several constant aperture Nikon-mount zoom lenses. I really believe people should buy what they need.. not what will sell better in future.

 

Hi,

 

Thanks for your reply. I'm not thinking in terms of resell value, I'm thinking in terms of future proofing your lens selection. I don't want to invest lots of money (and lots of money for me might not be lots of money for others) in something that I won't be able to use properly with the next camera that comes along. As far as I understand, you can't adapt a M43 lens to a larger sensor camera for example. And this isn't about what sensor size is better or anything like that, I just don't want to get glued to a particular system if you see what I mean. 

 

For filming purposes, I'd like to invest in some nice prime lenses and a constant aperture zoom lens for documentary-type projects. As it's all manual, I was thinking of getting some old glass that you can get from ebay at a great value/performance ratio.

 

For example, I've been looking at these lenses: Canon FDn 35-105 f3.5, Carl Zeiss 25mm f2.8 Distagon C/Y, Carl Zeiss T* Distagon 35mm f2,8 C/Y

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Recently got this camera and used it a number of occasions strictly for video.

 

Sometimes however I get a grainy texture to it similar to when ISO is cranked up. I upped the curves in Premiere, look at the shirt on the person to the right:

 

 

I want to know if their are optimal settings for Premiere to use with the GH4 and also when exporting.

 

Im using the 18-25 lens which is great.

 

The video - ISO is 200, 5 aperture at 1/50 second, 50 mps sec at 1080p

 

Here is another video I shot for the leafs which came out with less than stellar quality:

 

But here it is much better:

 

What am I doing wrong?

 

Thanks!

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The problem with the first two (indoor) videos is that you have underexposed by quite a lot. Noise always comes from shadows afterall. It is best to expose for highlights and then underexpose it in post if that's the look you're going for.

Would using the histogram help and if so, please advise.

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No, you should either use your eyes or use the Zebras function, as explained here: http://eng.faq.panasonic.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/26426/~/what-is-the-zebra-pattern%3F---dmc-gh4

In short, if you set the function to 100%, it will put a black and white pattern on any part of the image that has burnt out highlights (ie. white). You should expose your image so that there are none of these patterns showing. Although sometimes it is simply unavoidable, such as shooting someone against a window in a dark room on a very bright day.

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No, you should either use your eyes or use the Zebras function, as explained here: http://eng.faq.panasonic.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/26426/~/what-is-the-zebra-pattern%3F---dmc-gh4

In short, if you set the function to 100%, it will put a black and white pattern on any part of the image that has burnt out highlights (ie. white). You should expose your image so that there are none of these patterns showing. Although sometimes it is simply unavoidable, such as shooting someone against a window in a dark room on a very bright day.

Zebra patterns are set and I use them often.

 

It's the shadows I'm worried about as it often leads me to overcompensating for the underexposure.

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