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$10 IZOTOPE RX Elements Audio Restoration including noise reduction only 9 more hours in BH Photo Deal Zone


majoraxis
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For those who are on a tight budget and would like de-noise, de-clip, de-hum, de-click, BH Photo has IZOTOPE RX Elements Audio Restoration and Enhancement Software (Download) on sale for $10 (regularly $130) in the deal zone for 9 more hours.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1356812-REG/izotope_10_rxe_rx_elements_audio.html

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From the BH Photo Product Link:

"iZotope’s RX Elements comprises four of the real-time modules inside of RX 6 alongside their standalone audio editor. This provides the ability to use spectral editing to visualize audio and make precision adjustments to the frequency spectrum. The software is available for download and can operate either as a standalone application or as a plug-in for Mac- and Windows-based DAWs and NLEs. Thus, it is suitable for editing audio and audio-for-video."

So the bundle includes the standalone application for spectral editing that hosts the plug-ins and the individual plug-ins to run inside your DAW / NLE.

At $10, if you edit out one distracting sound with the spectral editor or noise reduce one dialog track - it's worth it.

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6 hours ago, majoraxis said:

For those who are on a tight budget and would like de-noise, de-clip, de-hum, de-click, BH Photo has IZOTOPE RX Elements Audio Restoration and Enhancement Software (Download) on sale for $10 (regularly $130) in the deal zone for 9 more hours.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1356812-REG/izotope_10_rxe_rx_elements_audio.html

Thanks!  I was reading through what it does thinking "this is probably another thing I don't need" until I remembered that one clip where I clipped the audio really badly but really wanted to use the shot...  :)

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1 hour ago, IronFilm said:

Reaper for instance is so cheap everyone should have it!

I don't know...  I only own Resolve and now these $10 plugins.  

Considering that Resolve includes Fairlight, the $60 for Reaper seems almost outlandish!

I say this partly tongue--in-cheek, but the value for money benchmark keeps getting higher and higher :)

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1 hour ago, IronFilm said:

But you don't even have to spend $60.... you could just stick with the free version. (like folks do with Resolve too)

To be fair though you are supposed to pay for reaper after the trial period. It doesnt lock you out, but i discourage taking advantagr of that. i am happy to pay $60 if only to show my support for non intrusive software--and it also happens to be a killer program that I use daily.

@kye tongue in cheek aside, reaper is signifcantly better than fairlight in my experience. It has a cleaner interface that is much friendlier to limited screensize and dual monitor setups, in my opinion. Also resolve still doesnt support 44.1 khz exports i think? Usually when i do a music video, the audio file is 44.1 and not only does resolve/fairlight force a conversion, it is a bad sounding conversion.

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3 hours ago, IronFilm said:

But you don't even have to spend $60.... you could just stick with the free version. (like folks do with Resolve too)

This is a wide spread misconception - there is no free version of Reaper. There is a 30 days free demo. The fact is that this demo does not stop working after the 30 days, so it is up to you and your conscience wether you pay or not. 

EDIT: Ups - just saw @KnightsFan had commented on this

 

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4 hours ago, KnightsFan said:

To be fair though you are supposed to pay for reaper after the trial period. It doesnt lock you out, but i discourage taking advantagr of that. i am happy to pay $60 if only to show my support for non intrusive software--and it also happens to be a killer program that I use daily.

@kye tongue in cheek aside, reaper is signifcantly better than fairlight in my experience. It has a cleaner interface that is much friendlier to limited screensize and dual monitor setups, in my opinion. Also resolve still doesnt support 44.1 khz exports i think? Usually when i do a music video, the audio file is 44.1 and not only does resolve/fairlight force a conversion, it is a bad sounding conversion.

It does look like a good program.

You're right that Resolve doesn't support non-48khz outputs yet.  This thread was interesting: https://forum.blackmagicdesign.com/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=47367

Of course, if you compare $399 for Fairlight with $60 for Reaper then it doesn't look so good, but there's more to Resolve than just the Fairlight page ;)

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22 minutes ago, kye said:

It does look like a good program.

You're right that Resolve doesn't support non-48khz outputs yet.  This thread was interesting: https://forum.blackmagicdesign.com/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=47367

Of course, if you compare $399 for Fairlight with $60 for Reaper then it doesn't look so good, but there's more to Resolve than just the Fairlight page ;)

It says the thread doesnt exist...

Yeah, I use resolve as my primary editor and of course for color correction. I got the full version of that, too, mainly for noise reduction. Certainly worth the price just for editing and color. At this point im strongly considering getting a fusion license when we hit post on my next project. Blackmagic really has phenomenal software. However, I tried using fairlight a few times, and really disliked it. I regularly have issues with the audio cutting out while editing, or popping, or suddenly getting really quiet for a few seconds. So at this point i dont trust fairlight for real use. The only time ive ever used it outside of testing was to add some compression to an audio track for a rough cut render. Just that once.

I suppose like many DAWs, fairlight probably gets a lot of mileage out of plugins like the RX pack. I think that reaper has a better approach in that regard, though, where there is no "builtin" EQ or dynamics, its all plugins. Not only does it come with a phenomenal library, its just as easy to use a 3rd party EQ as it is to use reaper's EQ. Fairlight seems to have built in stuff just sitting there taking up screen space even if you dont need it. Instead of memorizing lots of little functions, once you understand the broad design philosophy in reaper, you can figure out the rest intuitively, which was the opposite of my experience with fairlight.

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19 minutes ago, KnightsFan said:

It says the thread doesnt exist...

Odd, I clicked on the link from this thread and it worked.  I also pasted it into a browser that wasn't logged in as me on there and it worked too.

I'll paste it again - maybe this works? https://forum.blackmagicdesign.com/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=47367

19 minutes ago, KnightsFan said:

Yeah, I use resolve as my primary editor and of course for color correction. I got the full version of that, too, mainly for noise reduction. Certainly worth the price just for editing and color. At this point im strongly considering getting a fusion license when we hit post on my next project. Blackmagic really has phenomenal software. However, I tried using fairlight a few times, and really disliked it. I regularly have issues with the audio cutting out while editing, or popping, or suddenly getting really quiet for a few seconds. So at this point i dont trust fairlight for real use. The only time ive ever used it outside of testing was to add some compression to an audio track for a rough cut render. Just that once.

I suppose like many DAWs, fairlight probably gets a lot of mileage out of plugins like the RX pack. I think that reaper has a better approach in that regard, though, where there is no "builtin" EQ or dynamics, its all plugins. Not only does it come with a phenomenal library, its just as easy to use a 3rd party EQ as it is to use reaper's EQ. Fairlight seems to have built in stuff just sitting there taking up screen space even if you dont need it. Instead of memorizing lots of little functions, once you understand the broad design philosophy in reaper, you can figure out the rest intuitively, which was the opposite of my experience with fairlight.

No need to buy a Fusion license, it's built into Resolve now with v15, so you get that with your existing license.

The downside to Resolve is bugs.  They're moving so fast to add features (or integrate entire packages!) that they have some lingering bugs and others that crop up randomly.  Id say Fairlight audio issues are with the interface, and wouldn't render out from the Deliver page, but I could be wrong.  I've been using it since v12.5 and have experienced a few annoying issues, but nothing in the exported files.

I watched the two Fairlight guides that BM recently released (there weren't any good free resources before that) (link, link) but TBH I didn't see anything in there that was surprising to me.  I've used a few DAWs before, and am familiar with the traditional architecture of how a mixing desk works as well as how a normal mix and a mastering session would be constructed, so I guess that's why it seems pretty straight-forward.  I kind of was surprised that there wasn't more to it, because when I first heard about it over a decade ago having a multi-track recorder with infinite channels and built in effects, dynamics, para EQ, etc would have been pretty mind-blowing.

It's also worth noting that the screen layout of Resolve is quite flexible and you can expand, contract, minimise and hide panels as you like, but the controls to do those things aren't immediately obvious so there is a belief out there that you can't customise it at all.

19 minutes ago, KnightsFan said:

I suppose like many DAWs, fairlight probably gets a lot of mileage out of plugins like the RX pack. I think that reaper has a better approach in that regard, though, where there is no "builtin" EQ or dynamics, its all plugins. Not only does it come with a phenomenal library, its just as easy to use a 3rd party EQ as it is to use reaper's EQ. Fairlight seems to have built in stuff just sitting there taking up screen space even if you dont need it. Instead of memorizing lots of little functions, once you understand the broad design philosophy in reaper, you can figure out the rest intuitively, which was the opposite of my experience with fairlight.

I guess it depends on how you work and what your preferences are.  If you're just interested in the audio equivalent of the high-quality but generic and bland Canon 2.8 zooms then Fairlight is probably fine.  If you're the kind of person who has 28 different parametric EQ plugins because each has a different tone then obviously it's not a good match.  

In audio there is a spectrum that people work across, running from absolutely pristine audio reproduction at one end (where the goal is to get the audio from the room published with as little damage as possible) to creative mayhem at the other (where no-one cares what went into the microphones as long as the final product is great).  Music writing typically extends further into the more drastic end of processing than straight film audio, so that's going to push the tools in different directions.

For me, I'm more interested in taking the sounds I've recorded, cleaning them up if required (thus buying these izotope plugins), combining them in a way that supports the visuals, both in a literal sense for dialogue, but also in an emotional sense with ambience, volume automations, music, etc, and then getting them exported.  Good audio should be effortless and not draw attention to itself - so that's what I tend to use the tools for.  Having one set of generic tools (EQ, dynamics, and volume automations) works just fine in that sense as I'm not really creating, I'm editing.  And of course, having it integrated makes a huge difference, as my brain can't deal with picture-lock before I start thinking about audio!

There's nothing wrong with either - if you're working on a Hollywood blockbuster then you'll want to be doing sound design in a much more creative way, adding loads of foley and FX to really push the output in the right direction.  

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