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Mattias Burling

Film vs Digital "Shootout" for Fun

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Disclaimer: This is just for fun. Not meant to be fair, well lit, perfectly graded, scientific or anything else. Just a few shots while I had the two film cameras loaded.
IMO Film still kicks the ass of digital in looking what I consider "Good" and in dynamic range and color. But this is not suposed to be proof of that concept.
If you want an example of that I say watch "The Hateful Eight", "The Hurtlocker" or any other well shot movie on film.

In this video I compare some footage from a BMPCC, Digital Bolex and A7ii to a 16mm Bolex H16 and a Krasnogorsk-3.
I did it just for fun so don't read to much into it

The BMPCC was shot in Prores and the D16 in Raw. Both where graded with a 7207 LUT.
The H16 was shooting actual ISO 250 Kodak 7207.

The Krasnogorsk was shooting ISO 50 Kodak 7203 so thats the LUT the A7ii received.

 

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EOSHD Pro Color for Sony cameras EOSHD Pro LOG for Sony CamerasEOSHD C-LOG and Film Profiles for All Canon DSLRs

Maybe it is the noise, but the besides the look, film seems to have something that makes subjects come alive.  As you have said in the youtube comments, Gunpowder jumping is the obvious example. But also in the shot of yourself at the end.  The film shot would look great cut into a home movie reel or music video compared to the sony where you just look bored.

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I liked your post on another forum where you had users guess  which was of the clips presented was film.  Sad you didn't get more responses.  I couldn't believe how easily the 3 people I showed (none are into cameras or movies)   picked out the film clips and thought they looked best.

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Maybe it is the noise, but the besides the look, film seems to have something that makes subjects come alive.  As you have said in the youtube comments, Gunpowder jumping is the obvious example. But also in the shot of yourself at the end.  The film shot would look great cut into a home movie reel or music video compared to the sony where you just look bored.

Yeah, 
Gunpowder jumped because the H16 is a loud camera. She's not used to that.
And me, Im often borded when I do tests, its kinda the reason I make them. But for the Krasnogorsk clip I had to ask my GF to operate it and she was making fun of me. So more alive 
indeed :)

I liked your post on another forum where you had users guess  which was of the clips presented was film.  Sad you didn't get more responses.  I couldn't believe how easily the 3 people I showed (none are into cameras or movies)   picked out the film clips and thought they looked best.

Yeah, I got a fair bit of "hate" as well because I downgraded the BMPCC to throw people of a bit. Sensitive stuff when you mention peoples gear :)

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Thanks for share this excellent just for fun shootout.

I was wondering it the difference in color rendition between the BMPCC and Digital Bolex is due mostly to the CMOS vs CCD or ProRes vs Raw? Maybe a little of both I imagine...

I would say CCD vs CMOS since I treat the raw after switching it to BMD Film.

What causes the 'frame' on the film footage?

Normally you crop it out but I thought I leave it in for fun.

What transfer? How did you perform it?

Scanned it in a lab.

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Maybe it is the noise, but the besides the look, film seems to have something that makes subjects come alive.  As you have said in the youtube comments, Gunpowder jumping is the obvious example. But also in the shot of yourself at the end.  The film shot would look great cut into a home movie reel or music video compared to the sony where you just look bored.

It has to do with the contrast ratios and color that film manage, its hard to replicate in grading, its doable but hard. I shot with Fuji Eterna recently and looks gorgeous. Also in this test i don't think cameras where graded to mach, that makes more difference.

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Normally you crop it out but I thought I leave it in for fun.

But I mean how come the frame remains the same throughout? I have never shot motion picture film but I have shot stills where the scan came back with some of the frame in; but they never look the same from one shot to another. 

BTW I was also wondering; do you not feel uneasy having so many different cameras? Like you're a bit spoilt for choice :) If you were to shoot a movie what would you use? And how much do you pay for the film and processing?

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But I mean how come the frame remains the same throughout? I have never shot motion picture film but I have shot stills where the scan came back with some of the frame in; but they never look the same from one shot to another. 

BTW I was also wondering; do you not feel uneasy having so many different cameras? Like you're a bit spoilt for choice :) If you were to shoot a movie what would you use? And how much do you pay for the film and processing?

Since I only have two digital cameras its not that though of a choise.

Film cameras I also have two but would choose the K3 because I have lots of lenses for it.

I have so far not payed anything. Im making a guide soon on how to get a few rolls done for free.

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Thanks Mattias for the video. I love the texture, cadence and noise of film. There's a feeling of timelessness not found on popular digital cameras

I wonder if it would be possible to shoot a white wall with your film cameras, scan them at high resolution, and somehow apply them on a Sony A7 clips.. including film defects

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Thanks Mattias for the video. I love the texture, cadence and noise of film. There's a feeling of timelessness not found on popular digital cameras

I wonder if it would be possible to shoot a white wall with your film cameras, scan them at high resolution, and somehow apply them on a Sony A7 clips.. including film defects

Thats pretty much what Gorilla Grain is. Just place them on a  layer on top of your video and switch them to "Overlay". Done. Looks great.

A tip, don't buy them straight away. Sign up for their email and download the demo, what a while and they will send you a 50 dollar rebate.

They have one for free that you can try first.

http://gorillagrain.com

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