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Matt James Smith ?

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  1. Thanks
    Matt James Smith ? reacted to Andrew Reid in Canon XC-M ???   
    The Fujinon E-mount lenses are also very long, I'd say it would be a product along those lines.
    10mm-ish corresponds to a Micro Four Thirds sensor cropped to 16:9
    In 4:3 they are 17x13mm
  2. Like
    Matt James Smith ? reacted to Mattias Burling in Is FCPX still trash?   
    But you can also fade to an empty timeline and it will turn black.
  3. Like
    Matt James Smith ? reacted to Axel in Is FCPX still trash?   
    Yes, of course! Good explanation. If it's the last clip (appended at end), you could also hold p and slightly move it to the right (produces a slug). That'd be the fade-in. Then comes Matthias:
    This will fade out.
  4. Thanks
    Matt James Smith ? got a reaction from Axel in Is FCPX still trash?   
    @Andrew Reid if you want to fade to black, you need some black to fade to. 
    Snap the cursor to the beginning/end of your clip and hit Alt-W. That drops in a slug. Now you can Cmd-T (or drag any transition) onto your clip and it will transition to black. Simples.
    You have to stop thinking of the timeline as a static, empty canvas. It's more like a sculpture in space. The magnetic timeline is made up only of the elements you add and their interrelationships.
  5. Like
    Matt James Smith ? reacted to Mattias Burling in Is the EOS-M *THE* Digital Super-8 Camera?   
    I will be able to post some experimentation with s8 lenses soon. Have a few in transit.
  6. Like
    Matt James Smith ? reacted to Alpicat in Is the EOS-M *THE* Digital Super-8 Camera?   
    You can record 1376x1030 (4:3) 12-bit lossless continuously on the EOS-M in Movie crop mode no problem (or 14-bit lossless though that may reintroduce focus pixels). In fact you can record any resolution and aspect ratio with magic lantern, the limit is the camera's write speed. You can go even go up to 1440x1078 with the 5x zoom function as mentioned in the first post here (that's different to Movie crop mode) - though I haven't tested that yet.
    In terms of recording time with 1800x1024 12 bit-lossless, I'm getting between 10 seconds (very worst case) to 1 minute or so. Just tested it again and actually it seems that the amount of contrast in an image affects record times more than anything. If you want better record times in 12 bit, probably best to lower the res to 1792x1008 or so.
    Also I've just started using another program to convert MLVs to cdng files which has a very nice interface and features: https://ilia3101.github.io/MLV-App/   it was suggested by this youtube user: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_yXb2bt8l60
    I definitely miss my old BMPCC too. For sure the XC10 is much more ideal for normal HD filming than the EOS-M will ever be, but still the EOS-M isn't too bad for a camera that costs about £100. 
     
     
  7. Like
    Matt James Smith ? reacted to byuri734 in Is the EOS-M *THE* Digital Super-8 Camera?   
    Can one record 4:3 in "movie crop mode", something like 1370x1024... this would create a 4:3 image (like Super 8) and would help reduce file sizes and give you more time of 12-bit lossless? When you say recording time is drastically reduced with a "brightly lit scene," how many seconds you are taking about. Is it around 15 seconds at least? It could be interesting if so. Super 8 has a cartridge of around 3 minutes, I would rarely record more than 15 seconds per take, it was like shooting and editing at the same time, and that was really, really fun and of course less stressing than digital when doing the final editing, having to deal with hours and hours of long takes in post now!
  8. Like
    Matt James Smith ? reacted to Oliver Daniel in FCP 10.4 with new CC tools, 360°, HDR and Canon C200 RAW   
    It's way past the point now for the regular FCPX bashing. It still goes on. 
    While that happens, we FCPX users can enjoy this outstanding editing program. 
    I bloody love it!!!
  9. Like
    Matt James Smith ? got a reaction from kidzrevil in Is the EOS-M *THE* Digital Super-8 Camera?   
    I've been playing half-heartedly with ML on my EOS-M for a while but in general lost interest due to annoyances such as the focus pixels, low resolution and workflow. However, inspired by recently released footage from Kodak's new Super-8 camera and fond memories of playing with real Super-8 footage in art school, I decided to mess around with the EOS-M again to see how close I could get to the Super-8 aesthetic. Turns out I surprised myself!

    I've only shot a few early tests so far but the following video is, I think, very usable as a digital Super-8 stand-in. The basic specs are as follows:

    4:3 ratio (like Super-8) 
    1440 x 1078 resolution (plenty for Super-8)
    18fps (same as consumer Super-8)
    12-bit Lossless RAW (continuous!)
    5x zoom (haven't accurately calculated crop factor/sensor size in relation to Super-8 yet - would appreciate help with this)
    3X3 Crop mode (Experimental build: magiclantern-crop_rec_4k.2017Dec19.EOSM202)
    Also- no focus pixels! (I have no idea why this is. They reappear if you go up to 14bit lossless or use any of the standard 10/12/14-bit modes). 

    Below are two versions of my initial tests - the first is with FilmConvert film emulation applied, the second is without FilmConvert, just some basic contrast and saturation tweaks. Sorry the grade isn't very good I'm getting used to both the EOSM DNG's and FCPX's new grading tools.

    FilmConvert:
    https://vimeo.com/253014693/badd381eb4

    No FilmConvert:
    https://vimeo.com/253014620

    My post workflow is very simple: convert .MLV files to DNG's with MlRawViewer and then drop them straight into FCPX. Do a bit of colour correction with an adjustment layer if needed, then export clip as ProRes 4444 XQ. Bring it back into FCPX and conform the 18fps to the fps of the timeline (I always use a 25p timeline and *think* this requires slowing the 18fps clip to 72% but I'm not confident my maths are accurate - it certainly looks close to normal speed to me though).

    I'm not very technical so you won't find much explanation of why it's working from me. I'd appreciate contributions to what's going on here so I understand it better and other can replicate if they want to. In particular I'd like to figure out the effective sensor size I'm using, and also why there are no pink dots.

    The things that excite me about it as a viable Digital Super-8 camera are:
    1. The shutter speed - only Magic Lantern allows that really, and it really helps give that authentic Super-8 feel. 
    2. The 12bit colour space and RAW grain makes the footage film-like and organic. 

    3. The fact you can adapt C-mount lenses to the EOS-M. The lens I used for these tests is just the 15-45mm EF-M kit lens in manual focus mode. However I have a Cosmicar 6mm f/1.2 on its way to me as we speak and if I can get it to infinity focus I think I'll have a 'normal' lens (again, I need to figure out the imaging area I'm working with).

    4. Shooting 4:3 and 18fps, like Super-8, allows continuous shooting.

    Things I don't like:
    1. Live view is not perfect but using the info button you can jump between Canon's 5x zoom to focus and ML's rather choppy live view for framing.
    2. I'm not seeing horrible rolling shutter but it's no Digital Bolex so that does give it away as digital footage somewhat.

    I hope some others start playing around with these settings. With the 16mm Digital Bolex discontinued and Kodak's new Super-8 camera all the rage, there's a space for a small sensor digital cinema camera to get some love.
  10. Thanks
    Matt James Smith ? reacted to Alpicat in Is the EOS-M *THE* Digital Super-8 Camera?   
    I'm actually using a slightly newer build called "crop_rec_4k.2018Jan25.EOSM202" from magic lantern forum member dfort, available here: https://bitbucket.org/daniel_fort/magic-lantern/downloads/
    However the "magiclantern-crop_rec_4k.2017Dec19.EOSM202" build which is in the experimental builds page you've linked to also works absolutely fine from what I remember - and probably wiser to use that one.
    I am using the mlv_lite module yes, which means that I can't record sound unfortunately. The mlv_rec module completely fails to load on the camera when using this experimental build - I don't know if that will be fixed in future.
    Once the mlv_lite module is turned on - I'm just activating "Movie crop mode", and in the raw video options I select 12-bit lossless or 10 bit lossless at max 1800x1024 resolution. The length of time you can record in 12-bit depends on how much contrast and light there is in the scene, it can vary a lot. Lowering the resolution slightly will help increase record time in 12 bit lossless. 
  11. Like
    Matt James Smith ? got a reaction from Alpicat in Is the EOS-M *THE* Digital Super-8 Camera?   
    I've been playing half-heartedly with ML on my EOS-M for a while but in general lost interest due to annoyances such as the focus pixels, low resolution and workflow. However, inspired by recently released footage from Kodak's new Super-8 camera and fond memories of playing with real Super-8 footage in art school, I decided to mess around with the EOS-M again to see how close I could get to the Super-8 aesthetic. Turns out I surprised myself!

    I've only shot a few early tests so far but the following video is, I think, very usable as a digital Super-8 stand-in. The basic specs are as follows:

    4:3 ratio (like Super-8) 
    1440 x 1078 resolution (plenty for Super-8)
    18fps (same as consumer Super-8)
    12-bit Lossless RAW (continuous!)
    5x zoom (haven't accurately calculated crop factor/sensor size in relation to Super-8 yet - would appreciate help with this)
    3X3 Crop mode (Experimental build: magiclantern-crop_rec_4k.2017Dec19.EOSM202)
    Also- no focus pixels! (I have no idea why this is. They reappear if you go up to 14bit lossless or use any of the standard 10/12/14-bit modes). 

    Below are two versions of my initial tests - the first is with FilmConvert film emulation applied, the second is without FilmConvert, just some basic contrast and saturation tweaks. Sorry the grade isn't very good I'm getting used to both the EOSM DNG's and FCPX's new grading tools.

    FilmConvert:
    https://vimeo.com/253014693/badd381eb4

    No FilmConvert:
    https://vimeo.com/253014620

    My post workflow is very simple: convert .MLV files to DNG's with MlRawViewer and then drop them straight into FCPX. Do a bit of colour correction with an adjustment layer if needed, then export clip as ProRes 4444 XQ. Bring it back into FCPX and conform the 18fps to the fps of the timeline (I always use a 25p timeline and *think* this requires slowing the 18fps clip to 72% but I'm not confident my maths are accurate - it certainly looks close to normal speed to me though).

    I'm not very technical so you won't find much explanation of why it's working from me. I'd appreciate contributions to what's going on here so I understand it better and other can replicate if they want to. In particular I'd like to figure out the effective sensor size I'm using, and also why there are no pink dots.

    The things that excite me about it as a viable Digital Super-8 camera are:
    1. The shutter speed - only Magic Lantern allows that really, and it really helps give that authentic Super-8 feel. 
    2. The 12bit colour space and RAW grain makes the footage film-like and organic. 

    3. The fact you can adapt C-mount lenses to the EOS-M. The lens I used for these tests is just the 15-45mm EF-M kit lens in manual focus mode. However I have a Cosmicar 6mm f/1.2 on its way to me as we speak and if I can get it to infinity focus I think I'll have a 'normal' lens (again, I need to figure out the imaging area I'm working with).

    4. Shooting 4:3 and 18fps, like Super-8, allows continuous shooting.

    Things I don't like:
    1. Live view is not perfect but using the info button you can jump between Canon's 5x zoom to focus and ML's rather choppy live view for framing.
    2. I'm not seeing horrible rolling shutter but it's no Digital Bolex so that does give it away as digital footage somewhat.

    I hope some others start playing around with these settings. With the 16mm Digital Bolex discontinued and Kodak's new Super-8 camera all the rage, there's a space for a small sensor digital cinema camera to get some love.
  12. Like
    Matt James Smith ? got a reaction from maxmizer in Is the EOS-M *THE* Digital Super-8 Camera?   
    I've been playing half-heartedly with ML on my EOS-M for a while but in general lost interest due to annoyances such as the focus pixels, low resolution and workflow. However, inspired by recently released footage from Kodak's new Super-8 camera and fond memories of playing with real Super-8 footage in art school, I decided to mess around with the EOS-M again to see how close I could get to the Super-8 aesthetic. Turns out I surprised myself!

    I've only shot a few early tests so far but the following video is, I think, very usable as a digital Super-8 stand-in. The basic specs are as follows:

    4:3 ratio (like Super-8) 
    1440 x 1078 resolution (plenty for Super-8)
    18fps (same as consumer Super-8)
    12-bit Lossless RAW (continuous!)
    5x zoom (haven't accurately calculated crop factor/sensor size in relation to Super-8 yet - would appreciate help with this)
    3X3 Crop mode (Experimental build: magiclantern-crop_rec_4k.2017Dec19.EOSM202)
    Also- no focus pixels! (I have no idea why this is. They reappear if you go up to 14bit lossless or use any of the standard 10/12/14-bit modes). 

    Below are two versions of my initial tests - the first is with FilmConvert film emulation applied, the second is without FilmConvert, just some basic contrast and saturation tweaks. Sorry the grade isn't very good I'm getting used to both the EOSM DNG's and FCPX's new grading tools.

    FilmConvert:
    https://vimeo.com/253014693/badd381eb4

    No FilmConvert:
    https://vimeo.com/253014620

    My post workflow is very simple: convert .MLV files to DNG's with MlRawViewer and then drop them straight into FCPX. Do a bit of colour correction with an adjustment layer if needed, then export clip as ProRes 4444 XQ. Bring it back into FCPX and conform the 18fps to the fps of the timeline (I always use a 25p timeline and *think* this requires slowing the 18fps clip to 72% but I'm not confident my maths are accurate - it certainly looks close to normal speed to me though).

    I'm not very technical so you won't find much explanation of why it's working from me. I'd appreciate contributions to what's going on here so I understand it better and other can replicate if they want to. In particular I'd like to figure out the effective sensor size I'm using, and also why there are no pink dots.

    The things that excite me about it as a viable Digital Super-8 camera are:
    1. The shutter speed - only Magic Lantern allows that really, and it really helps give that authentic Super-8 feel. 
    2. The 12bit colour space and RAW grain makes the footage film-like and organic. 

    3. The fact you can adapt C-mount lenses to the EOS-M. The lens I used for these tests is just the 15-45mm EF-M kit lens in manual focus mode. However I have a Cosmicar 6mm f/1.2 on its way to me as we speak and if I can get it to infinity focus I think I'll have a 'normal' lens (again, I need to figure out the imaging area I'm working with).

    4. Shooting 4:3 and 18fps, like Super-8, allows continuous shooting.

    Things I don't like:
    1. Live view is not perfect but using the info button you can jump between Canon's 5x zoom to focus and ML's rather choppy live view for framing.
    2. I'm not seeing horrible rolling shutter but it's no Digital Bolex so that does give it away as digital footage somewhat.

    I hope some others start playing around with these settings. With the 16mm Digital Bolex discontinued and Kodak's new Super-8 camera all the rage, there's a space for a small sensor digital cinema camera to get some love.
  13. Like
    Matt James Smith ? got a reaction from Kisaha in Is the EOS-M *THE* Digital Super-8 Camera?   
    I've been playing half-heartedly with ML on my EOS-M for a while but in general lost interest due to annoyances such as the focus pixels, low resolution and workflow. However, inspired by recently released footage from Kodak's new Super-8 camera and fond memories of playing with real Super-8 footage in art school, I decided to mess around with the EOS-M again to see how close I could get to the Super-8 aesthetic. Turns out I surprised myself!

    I've only shot a few early tests so far but the following video is, I think, very usable as a digital Super-8 stand-in. The basic specs are as follows:

    4:3 ratio (like Super-8) 
    1440 x 1078 resolution (plenty for Super-8)
    18fps (same as consumer Super-8)
    12-bit Lossless RAW (continuous!)
    5x zoom (haven't accurately calculated crop factor/sensor size in relation to Super-8 yet - would appreciate help with this)
    3X3 Crop mode (Experimental build: magiclantern-crop_rec_4k.2017Dec19.EOSM202)
    Also- no focus pixels! (I have no idea why this is. They reappear if you go up to 14bit lossless or use any of the standard 10/12/14-bit modes). 

    Below are two versions of my initial tests - the first is with FilmConvert film emulation applied, the second is without FilmConvert, just some basic contrast and saturation tweaks. Sorry the grade isn't very good I'm getting used to both the EOSM DNG's and FCPX's new grading tools.

    FilmConvert:
    https://vimeo.com/253014693/badd381eb4

    No FilmConvert:
    https://vimeo.com/253014620

    My post workflow is very simple: convert .MLV files to DNG's with MlRawViewer and then drop them straight into FCPX. Do a bit of colour correction with an adjustment layer if needed, then export clip as ProRes 4444 XQ. Bring it back into FCPX and conform the 18fps to the fps of the timeline (I always use a 25p timeline and *think* this requires slowing the 18fps clip to 72% but I'm not confident my maths are accurate - it certainly looks close to normal speed to me though).

    I'm not very technical so you won't find much explanation of why it's working from me. I'd appreciate contributions to what's going on here so I understand it better and other can replicate if they want to. In particular I'd like to figure out the effective sensor size I'm using, and also why there are no pink dots.

    The things that excite me about it as a viable Digital Super-8 camera are:
    1. The shutter speed - only Magic Lantern allows that really, and it really helps give that authentic Super-8 feel. 
    2. The 12bit colour space and RAW grain makes the footage film-like and organic. 

    3. The fact you can adapt C-mount lenses to the EOS-M. The lens I used for these tests is just the 15-45mm EF-M kit lens in manual focus mode. However I have a Cosmicar 6mm f/1.2 on its way to me as we speak and if I can get it to infinity focus I think I'll have a 'normal' lens (again, I need to figure out the imaging area I'm working with).

    4. Shooting 4:3 and 18fps, like Super-8, allows continuous shooting.

    Things I don't like:
    1. Live view is not perfect but using the info button you can jump between Canon's 5x zoom to focus and ML's rather choppy live view for framing.
    2. I'm not seeing horrible rolling shutter but it's no Digital Bolex so that does give it away as digital footage somewhat.

    I hope some others start playing around with these settings. With the 16mm Digital Bolex discontinued and Kodak's new Super-8 camera all the rage, there's a space for a small sensor digital cinema camera to get some love.
  14. Thanks
    Matt James Smith ? reacted to Stanley in Shutter speed/ frame rate question   
    Not if your shot is static, you should get away with it ok. If you're panning in your shot the motion cadence may show up. 
     
  15. Like
    Matt James Smith ? got a reaction from mercer in Is the EOS-M *THE* Digital Super-8 Camera?   
    I've been playing half-heartedly with ML on my EOS-M for a while but in general lost interest due to annoyances such as the focus pixels, low resolution and workflow. However, inspired by recently released footage from Kodak's new Super-8 camera and fond memories of playing with real Super-8 footage in art school, I decided to mess around with the EOS-M again to see how close I could get to the Super-8 aesthetic. Turns out I surprised myself!

    I've only shot a few early tests so far but the following video is, I think, very usable as a digital Super-8 stand-in. The basic specs are as follows:

    4:3 ratio (like Super-8) 
    1440 x 1078 resolution (plenty for Super-8)
    18fps (same as consumer Super-8)
    12-bit Lossless RAW (continuous!)
    5x zoom (haven't accurately calculated crop factor/sensor size in relation to Super-8 yet - would appreciate help with this)
    3X3 Crop mode (Experimental build: magiclantern-crop_rec_4k.2017Dec19.EOSM202)
    Also- no focus pixels! (I have no idea why this is. They reappear if you go up to 14bit lossless or use any of the standard 10/12/14-bit modes). 

    Below are two versions of my initial tests - the first is with FilmConvert film emulation applied, the second is without FilmConvert, just some basic contrast and saturation tweaks. Sorry the grade isn't very good I'm getting used to both the EOSM DNG's and FCPX's new grading tools.

    FilmConvert:
    https://vimeo.com/253014693/badd381eb4

    No FilmConvert:
    https://vimeo.com/253014620

    My post workflow is very simple: convert .MLV files to DNG's with MlRawViewer and then drop them straight into FCPX. Do a bit of colour correction with an adjustment layer if needed, then export clip as ProRes 4444 XQ. Bring it back into FCPX and conform the 18fps to the fps of the timeline (I always use a 25p timeline and *think* this requires slowing the 18fps clip to 72% but I'm not confident my maths are accurate - it certainly looks close to normal speed to me though).

    I'm not very technical so you won't find much explanation of why it's working from me. I'd appreciate contributions to what's going on here so I understand it better and other can replicate if they want to. In particular I'd like to figure out the effective sensor size I'm using, and also why there are no pink dots.

    The things that excite me about it as a viable Digital Super-8 camera are:
    1. The shutter speed - only Magic Lantern allows that really, and it really helps give that authentic Super-8 feel. 
    2. The 12bit colour space and RAW grain makes the footage film-like and organic. 

    3. The fact you can adapt C-mount lenses to the EOS-M. The lens I used for these tests is just the 15-45mm EF-M kit lens in manual focus mode. However I have a Cosmicar 6mm f/1.2 on its way to me as we speak and if I can get it to infinity focus I think I'll have a 'normal' lens (again, I need to figure out the imaging area I'm working with).

    4. Shooting 4:3 and 18fps, like Super-8, allows continuous shooting.

    Things I don't like:
    1. Live view is not perfect but using the info button you can jump between Canon's 5x zoom to focus and ML's rather choppy live view for framing.
    2. I'm not seeing horrible rolling shutter but it's no Digital Bolex so that does give it away as digital footage somewhat.

    I hope some others start playing around with these settings. With the 16mm Digital Bolex discontinued and Kodak's new Super-8 camera all the rage, there's a space for a small sensor digital cinema camera to get some love.
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