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Andrew Reid

Happy halloween - Europe to introduce Article 13 - Making filming and photography in public illegal

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Wow.

What I also don't like is the idea that it's ok for advertisers to bombard us everywhere we go, but we're not allowed to photograph it. So, they can fill our mind-space with their products to make money- but we would not be legally allowed to record it ourselves. That's like a one way street.

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EOSHD Pro Color for Sony cameras EOSHD Pro LOG for Sony CamerasEOSHD C-LOG and Film Profiles for All Canon DSLRs

how about making a series of mockumentries  maybe 2 or 3 minutes long showing just how ludicrous, ( insert your own adjective here ) this is

points are given for creative use of  blur or what other means of censorship you can come up within your video, if it goes viral awesome :)

as we, the group of people who will most likely be impacted  it's on us to make our point before the idea goes too far.

we have all got video or cinema cameras, we probably spend more time here in the forum than we need too, get outside and use it or lose it as the saying goes

lets start a movement, post to youtube or vimeo maybe create a channel called article 13 or something if we get something going now and people become aware and get onside the sky's the limit

well that's my 2 cents worth, feel free to be inspired or not

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I wish that shit would drop where I live. I love breaking stupid laws and then trolling the fuck out the fuckers that make them. If this is for real, the internet is going to have shitloads of fun with this one. So many teeny tiny brains. All you can do is shake your head and laugh at the idiocracy.

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I’m sorry Andrew, but the tone in your post is aggressive and reads like something I’d expect from the Sun or the Daily Mail. I spent many years living in the UK and am heartbroken about Brexit. 

And yet I am not surprised, your post displays exactly why Brexit happened. Just as so many others in the UK you’re using the EU to project your frustration rather than aim that anger at the politicians that have ravaged your country over the last three decades. The UK has the largest income differences in Europe and the poverty and decay is astounding. Somehow British politicians and media have managed to make the EU a villain rather than get their own shit together. 

The UK is without a doubt the European country I’ve lived in (4 so far) where it’s the most difficult to photograph in public. By far.

Perhaps you could try and excercise a bit of trust rather than spew vitriol against the EU? You really think it’s that bad? Last I looked the EU is a very successful peace project that safeguards a continent ravaged by brutal wars for centuries. 

So f-n tired of British people whining about bloody banana regulations or the EU interfering with winter savings time or whatever. 

You should put some sources, links and context for your post. Then, perhaps it will have some semblance of credibility. 

So many posts in this thread are nothing but depressing. Welcome to the outrage factory!

Quality.

 

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42 minutes ago, Castorp said:

I’m sorry Andrew, but the tone in your post is aggressive and reads like something I’d expect from the Sun or the Daily Mail. I spent many years living in the UK and am heartbroken about Brexit. 

And yet I am not surprised, your post displays exactly why Brexit happened. Just as so many others in the UK you’re using the EU to project your frustration rather than aim that anger at the politicians that have ravaged your country over the last three decades. The UK has the largest income differences in Europe and the poverty and decay is astounding. Somehow British politicians and media have managed to make the EU a villain rather than get their own shit together. 

The UK is without a doubt the European country I’ve lived in (4 so far) where it’s the most difficult to photograph in public. By far.

Perhaps you could try and excercise a bit of trust rather than spew vitriol against the EU? You really think it’s that bad? Last I looked the EU is a very successful peace project that safeguards a continent ravaged by brutal wars for centuries. 

So f-n tired of British people whining about bloody banana regulations or the EU interfering with winter savings time or whatever. 

You should put some sources, links and context for your post. Then, perhaps it will have some semblance of credibility. 

So many posts in this thread are nothing but depressing. Welcome to the outrage factory!

Quality.

 

So are you saying the EU is not responsible for Article 13? Are you blaming the UK public for this? I really don't understand your position on Article 13? Are you saying the outrage is hyperbolic? Seems like a whole lotta misdirection when there is something quite specific being spoken about.

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On 10/27/2018 at 9:13 AM, Castorp said:

The UK is without a doubt the European country I’ve lived in (4 so far) where it’s the most difficult to photograph in public. By far.

Ehh?? What problems have you encountered? A few years ago some ignorant police officers in London used to throw their weight around with press & TV crews until they got re-educated. Here's a link to the advice of the Metropolitan Police regarding street photography which contains this paragraph

Quote

 

Freedom to photograph and film

Members of the public and the media do not need a permit to film or photograph in public places and police have no power to stop them filming or photographing incidents or police personnel.

 

https://www.met.police.uk/advice/advice-and-information/ph/photography-advice/

You may encounter a hysterical reaction from parents if you start photographing their children but if they are in a public place then it's perfectly legal.

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The problem you do come across in the UK though are the number of places where there is a not unreasonable presumption of them being public spaces when they aren't in fact public at all but privately owned.

This means that the owners are perfectly within their rights to stop you taking photographs and more often than not have security staff who are keen/bored enough to enforce those rights.

Unfortunately, there is very little in the way of signage to inform people that the seemingly public square or whatever they are standing in isn't public at all.

So the first they will know about it will be when a security guard appears and tells them to stop taking pictures. And with the blanket CCTV coverage of these places, they definitely will appear. 

London is particularly rife with these pseudo public spaces but by no means unique in the UK. 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/jul/24/revealed-pseudo-public-space-pops-london-investigation-map

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They try everywhere to stop you.  I have been challenged several times even in Texas.  In most Texas cities, there is an unlimited right to film or photograph in a public place.  But there are numerous busybodies out there who come up and ask, "Do you have a permit?".  My first reply now is, "And you are...?".  If they actually have some authority, I answer yes and refer them to a city official who actually knows what the rules are.  If they interfere with my process, I call the police.  If the police give me trouble, I refer them to their police legal advisor, which every Texas city has.
When a  logo is prominent in the background, I take it out in post.  First, it seems like common courtesy, and second, why should I provide free marketing?

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ARTICLE 13

Use of protected content by information society service providers storing and giving access to large amounts of works and other subject-matter uploaded by their users:

Information society service providers that store and provide to the public access to large amounts of works or other subject-matter uploaded by their users shall, in cooperation with rightholders, take measures to ensure the functioning of agreements concluded with rightholders for the use of their works or other subject-matter or to prevent the availability on their services of works or other subject-matter identified by rightholders through the cooperation with the service providers. Those measures, such as the use of effective content recognition technologies, shall be appropriate and proportionate. The service providers shall provide rightholders with adequate information on the functioning and the deployment of the measures, as well as, when relevant, adequate reporting on the recognition and use of the works and other subject-matter.

Member States shall ensure that the service providers referred to in paragraph 1 put in place complaints and redress mechanisms that are available to users in case of disputes over the application of the measures referred to in paragraph 1.

Member States shall facilitate, where appropriate, the cooperation between the information society service providers and rightholders through stakeholder dialogues to define best practices, such as appropriate and proportionate content recognition technologies, taking into account, among others, the nature of the services, the availability of the technologies and their effectiveness in light of technological developments.

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