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lenny87

Is there any disadvantages of filming portrait style (vertical)

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Hello there,

I always film in a greenscreen room. And i always film one person who is standing on the same spot.

therefore many people have recommended me to film portrait style. Now i would like to know

if there are any technical disadvantages about this?

Thanx in front

greetz Lenny

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The only problem ^

(Certain people will think you're crazy). I've always thought it would be fun to mess with, but the implication would always be you're using a smartphone and don't know nothin

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In the dim distant past, Newtek used to demonstrate their Tricasters at tradeshows with the cameras in portrait mode for this exact application.

The logic was that using SD cameras in that orientation was giving them the equivalent of HD resolution for the limited area of interest that they required for their task. This worked well to not only save a bunch of cash (HD cameras were exotic at the time! ) and showcased their real time scaling and rotation capabilities for their virtual set system.

The same situation doesn't apply now but using the same logic would give you an 8K equivalent I suppose ;)

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If you're in a green screen studio, it's perfectly fine. On green screen shoots whatever isn't the person you're filming is cut out anyway, so as long as you put the footage in a 16x9 sequence not a 9x16 you're golden. Only you will know how it was filmed vertical. I'd say go for it, you'll have more flexibility in post too 

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6 minutes ago, BTM_Pix said:

In the dim distant past, Newtek used to demonstrate their Tricasters at tradeshows with the cameras in portrait mode for this exact application.

The logic was that using SD cameras in that orientation was giving them the equivalent of HD resolution for the limited area of interest that they required for their task. This worked well to not only save a bunch of cash (HD cameras were exotic at the time! ) and showcased their real time scaling and rotation capabilities for their virtual set system.

The same situation doesn't apply now but using the same logic would give you an 8K equivalent I suppose ;)

Well at least i can zoom in more in post as i am filming always in a green screen room.

So as far as you know there a re no technical disadvantages?

thanx

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5 minutes ago, Anaconda_ said:

Maybe the image stabilisation might have issues, but I assume you're on a tripod anyway. Other than that, I don't know how there would be any disadvantages.

yeah you are right i am filming on a tripod :-) So i guess i could turn of the Image stabilization?

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Yeah I wasn't thinking about greenscreen making it okay, duh.

Rolling shutter might look weird if that comes up, and you'll have to rotate and scale your footage every time. Scaling at weird numbers, especially if there's some sharpening present might give it a weird effect, moire, alliasing etc. Have to adjust the focal lengths, if you're particular about that at all. A video tripod usually doesn't even have an option to flip the camera over like that comfortably. Not sure if there's anything else.. do your thing

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@lenny87

Most "cinematographers" would say: People filming vertical videos are crazy / cluess / ignorant. But breaking the rules can even be an advantage for you - depending on what you want to do or express with the footage. Years ago many old, "experienced" photographers got crazy when other photogs broke the rule of thirds...So what? Nowadays many people break this "rule" because of artistic or individual aspects. There are quite many compositional cases, when it would be better to break rules...Don't necessarly do the same shit like million others, just try something new from time to time....

What I want to say: If you want to test filming verticals, just do this. It's your (artistic) choice...BTW: There are some filmers doing it (mostly for PR or promotional short films) on Instagram or FB and you know what? It works in many cases...So, it seems not to be a deal breaker for common audience of this films. Like in 99,9% of cases, it's the content, not the format...

Only self proclaimed "experts" go crazy on this... :grin:

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1 hour ago, lenny87 said:

Well at least i can zoom in more in post as i am filming always in a green screen room.

So as far as you know there a re no technical disadvantages?

thanx

In all likelihood, no.

However, you should test it with the specific camera and lens combination you are going to use it with.

If you need to stop the particular lens down so that the edge sharpness is acceptable (as the main point of interest will no longer be in the centre of the frame in this orientation) then you might negate the advantages by introducing more noise etc.

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Check out this: 
http://www.verticalcinema.org

They even work with analog projection (and modified projectors). - In the smartphone age, vertical video is IMHO more relevant as an innovation of filmmaking than VR, 3D, AR and what have you. Those who will first be able to creatively work with this format, and invent new filmic languages for it (just like Western movies invented a filmic language for widescreen cinema), will win. Conservatives will lose.

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I think half of the people responding (or more) aren't reading the post and just reacting to the title. You're intending to place the keyed footage on a landscape final product, right? If you're shooting a stationary person, portrait would give you more resolution for greenscreen work. I haven't done it personally, but I've seen plenty of BTS with vertical cameras for situations like this, maximizing the amount of the sensor you're using.

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