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hyalinejim

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  1. Like
    hyalinejim got a reaction from Mattias Burling in Ursa mini...is this the end of blackmagic?   
    So that's what all those hieroglyphs are: ancient Egyptian pottery rants and fanboyism...
  2. Like
    hyalinejim got a reaction from Lintelfilm in Canon XC10 4K camcorder   
    Yes, I see it and it's not pretty! I noticed it first in HD (after firmware update) and to a lesser extent in 4K. Switching between IS modes makes no difference but it does increase with ISO.
    It makes HD footage unusable at 3200 if there's any movement of high contrast areas. The DV Info review points it out and theorises that the ghosting artifacts are due to an in-camera temporal noise reduction. The reviewer spotted it during a rolling shutter test:

    Now that I've seen it in my own footage I can't unsee it! It seems to even be present, but very subtly, at 500. Whack up the ISO a bit, zoom in on a contrasty line and wiggle the camera a bit. You'll see it too ?
    Now, I know the latest firmware "improved" high ISO performance in HD. But has it caused a worsening of ghosting? I took only a handful of shots before updating so I can't really check for sure. Of course, the sensible thing would be to have an option to disable all noise reduction but... it's Canon.
  3. Like
    hyalinejim reacted to Lintelfilm in Canon XC10 4K camcorder   
    Has anyone else noticed weird ghosting/banding with the XC10? It's most visible in out of focus areas (hence blurred images below). I've noticed it most in 4K though not sure about HD. My best guess is it's something to do with IS but I really have no idea. I've never seen anything like it before. Images below (look at the skin/face in the first two, and to the right of the face in profile on the last image for a "ghost profile" in the shadow). Very weird.).
     
    The XC10 manual says "ghosting, artefacts and/or dark areas may appear when using Dynamic IS" --- however Dynamic IS isn't available in 4K mode (which the frame grabs above are from). I'll do some tests with/without IS but if anyone has experienced this too I'd like to hear about it.
     
  4. Like
    hyalinejim got a reaction from jpfilmz in Canon XC10 4K camcorder   
    Got my XC10 this morning. Still playing with it when I really should be working! As promised I slapped an Isco pre36 on it to see if it's usable. Shots below are at 24mm, 80, 240 and 80.



    There's slight vignetting at 80mm, which turns to pronounced white vignetting when pointed at a light source. Nevertheless, it's nice to have the option of a stabilised 80-240 anamorphic, even if it is at 5.6 on a 1" sensor.
  5. Like
    hyalinejim got a reaction from mercer in Canon XC10 4K camcorder   
    Got my XC10 this morning. Still playing with it when I really should be working! As promised I slapped an Isco pre36 on it to see if it's usable. Shots below are at 24mm, 80, 240 and 80.



    There's slight vignetting at 80mm, which turns to pronounced white vignetting when pointed at a light source. Nevertheless, it's nice to have the option of a stabilised 80-240 anamorphic, even if it is at 5.6 on a 1" sensor.
  6. Like
    hyalinejim got a reaction from Tim Sewell in Canon XC10 4K camcorder   
    Got my XC10 this morning. Still playing with it when I really should be working! As promised I slapped an Isco pre36 on it to see if it's usable. Shots below are at 24mm, 80, 240 and 80.



    There's slight vignetting at 80mm, which turns to pronounced white vignetting when pointed at a light source. Nevertheless, it's nice to have the option of a stabilised 80-240 anamorphic, even if it is at 5.6 on a 1" sensor.
  7. Like
    hyalinejim got a reaction from Mattias Burling in Canon XC10 4K camcorder   
    Got my XC10 this morning. Still playing with it when I really should be working! As promised I slapped an Isco pre36 on it to see if it's usable. Shots below are at 24mm, 80, 240 and 80.



    There's slight vignetting at 80mm, which turns to pronounced white vignetting when pointed at a light source. Nevertheless, it's nice to have the option of a stabilised 80-240 anamorphic, even if it is at 5.6 on a 1" sensor.
  8. Like
    hyalinejim got a reaction from kaylee in OMG I GOT A 5D3!!! ??? - Magic Lantern raw best practices 2016 *ALSO* Try Resolve - its free!   
    Sounds like you're having fun! MLRAW is very exciting, especially when you see the amount of colour detail that can be extracted. As Squig pointed out, 2 popular work flows involve converting the DNGs to a visually lossless 444 codec.
     
    Resolve is much much faster at this. But ACR gives a slightly cleaner image and possibly nicer colour reproduction. If you value the ACR image quality, it might be worth investing in Cinelog, which will give you a log image from ACR with all highlight and shadow info present and correct.
    So if I'm doing a job with a quick turnaround I'll use Resolve. Otherwise I use ACR to After Effects. Transcoding times are loooong.
    +1 for ETTR. You will get strong noise at higher ISOs in the shadows. Luckily the RAW histogram option shows the noise floor. Try to stay out of it.
    Finally, check out the new crop.rec module (not to be confused with the older greyscale crop mode). It turns your camera into a superzoom! 
  9. Like
    hyalinejim reacted to tomekk in Sony Will Announce the A6500   
    There is also a third model which I think Sony has taken (it's also quite a new approach). Don't you think Sony delivers features but a lot of the time they're not 100% reliable like on Canikons? They're unreliable to the point that some people after initial OHs and WOWs switch back. The third model is based around Lean startup method in which you intentionally release lower quality products in order to improve them later on.(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lean_startup). The idea is to get a "good enough" product on the market ASAP and improve it over time (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lean_startup#Minimum_viable_product). This way you can release cutting edge technologies earlier and more often, cut the costs (less testing time etc) and get feedback from customers earlier. The downsides we all know, don't we ;)? We're all unpaid beta testers all the time in a way. There is also something called split testing in which "different versions of a product are offered to customers at the same time" - sounds familiar, doesn't it? 
    It'll be interesting to see which model will come out first in the end, though!
  10. Like
    hyalinejim reacted to Axel in Never Satisfied   
    Film is also a language.
    Static tripod shots are a way of saying (because they are understood subconsciously in that way by the audience): "Look here, I wanna to show you something I have selected for your consideration".
    The fast zoom of the late seventies and early eighties says: "And it's THIS !!!"
    Until Godards À bout de souffle (Breathless) of 1950, hand-held camera meant either POV or amateur. Suddenly people realized that a doc-style hand camera did NOT say: "this is something witnessed by a camera operator, there is no structured narration", but that it added emotion to the scene. It said, "what happens here is (or WAS) not fully controlled or understood". Godard, also a film-philosopher, explained that cinema showed "death at work". The viewer of a traditional movie was like someone who sits in a train, in driving direction. He could anticipate everything because it slowly moved into his field of vision. Cuts with perfect continuity or with a too obvious narrative function, motifs carefully framed and presented in cold blood. A deterministic world view, down-to-earth (or down-to-your-knees!) morals, Pleasantville. Every 'film of life' has the same curve bending from the cradle to the grave.
    Revolting for the existentialistic Godard. He wanted audiences breathless. I think that a gimbal or IBIS stabilized shot that is deliberately made shaky in post does NOT transport this. People who want "total stabilization" often also demand HFR, 48, 50, 60 fps. This smoothes motion, true, but it effectively makes motion blur (or lack of motion blur!) almost invisible. They smoothed motion, but they also stopped (e-)motion. Film is a language, and it needs as much differentiation as possible. Sharp - unsharp, stable - shaky, smooth - choppy, contrasty - misty, giant - tiny, what have you. Film is not about technical perfection. If a gimbal shot looks as if made by the Terminator (I own the Ronin M, so I'm not a hater), you don't need servo sounds for the audience to sense this, imo.

    RS already has it's place in the vocabulary of contemporary cinema. If there is an explosion or sth. like that filmed in the aforementioned Nouvelle Vague fashion, RS will add emotion AND authenticity. Of course not in the long tripod shot in which Daniel Craig escapes with the explosion on the horizon. Let me add another semiotic polarity: UGLYYYYY - nice ...
    EDIT: I can't remember which film it was, but only recently I saw RS flashes (images torn in their middle) in an, er, blockbuster. Viewing habits have already adopted that look.
  11. Like
    hyalinejim got a reaction from Michael Coffee in Canon 80D first impressions and 3x crop mode   
    I'm holding out for the GH13
  12. Like
    hyalinejim got a reaction from Lintelfilm in Monitoring Headphones Recommendations Please   
    Have the HD25s for a few years now. They're light but sturdy. Would highly recommend.
  13. Like
    hyalinejim got a reaction from Ty Harper in Canon 5D III x Lexar 256GB CF: max recording time: 38:34 .. make sense?!!   
    It probably makes sense if you're shooting at 30p. The numbers seem roughly correct. If you shoot at 24p you should be getting 49min of 1920x1080 on a 256gb card.
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