Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
DBounce

Shooting Film For Stills - Am I Crazy?

Recommended Posts

Be forewarned that the Nikon 9000 is significantly better than a flatbed, but even then you'll want to scan multi-pass and it is such a pain.

I went from Nikon SLR (with broken shutter speeds and a nonfunctioning meter) to 6x7 to a 4x5 Toyoview... which was actually really cheap but it was $20/shot and $100+ to scan and I'm not that good a photographer so I sold it. Working without a meter in the camera definitely helped me learn to meter, but I only shot slide film for the most part since with color negative the lab is processing to taste so you can't really judge your ability to expose.

The Mamiya 7 is the coolest thing going, but for landscapes nothing compares with a view camera (except maybe a $50k back and a Sinar digital view camera), but in retrospect I kind of like the smaller formats where you can feel the grit more... which scan worse on the flatbeds. I didn't need another hobby, but I enjoyed shooting film much more than shooting digital.

Very fond of the Hasselblad 500 form factor and the Rollei TLRs, though I never owned either. You can also scan your own stuff and send your best work out for a drum scan or Imacon scan. Or frankly just whatever any lab sends you is probably better than scanning at home and a lot easier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
EOSHD Pro Color for Sony cameras EOSHD Pro LOG for Sony CamerasEOSHD C-LOG and Film Profiles for All Canon DSLRs

Would love a Leica M9 but frankly there is no such thing as a digital camera that is like film, or like shooting film. 

12 frames. A week or a month until you get to see what’s on there. The joy of pulling the wet film out of the tank and seeing rich beautiful negatives. Lowering a carefully printed silver gelatine into selenium and seeing dmax intensify and then tones split off into plum and rust. 

The physicality of it all. The picture is really a picture straight away right there on the film. There’s a magic to that realness. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, DBounce said:

I'm not convinced on what I will be shooting. I have a Canon Pixma Pro 10 which I will use for smaller prints. I send out larger prints. I also plan to get an Epson V850 Pro Scanner.  Yes, the B&W film development process looks pretty straight forward. So I do intend to shoot B&W initially.

film cameras is a vast world.

tons of cameras that are good. processing b+w is not difficult no, just have to be serious with time and temps, or you cannot be and experiment ;)

maybe i would go for a cheap 35mm cam point and shoot, have some fun with it, see if you like it and then maybe put some more money into a better cam and lenses.

films cameras are easy to buy, not so easy to sell so maybe try to see if you really like it before putting some money into it.

i had tons of cameras, sold them all, just kept a fuji 645wi and a holga (which i'll never sell because i would get 5$ fot it lol)

you can have some really sharp cameras, and i mean lenses here because the camera doesn't do much, and some more arty softer ones.

it's like buying a car, you can buy one because you just like how it looks or buy one because you have some specific needs. once you know what your needs are then we can help.

if it is just a crush then you don't need help ;)

for scans, you will put some money into it because why having a bad scan, it will ruin your work. the good ones can be found, not that epxensive, but maintenance is another story as they are mostly old. some of them also only work on old systems. don't know the epson v850. used to work with imacon, heidelberg and creo

but scanning film is not that easy, it used to be, and still is, a job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if you had video and and some vintage lenses and  were moving into 35mm then i would buy a system that could use the lenses i already had and build onto it from there. of course that doesn't work so well for medium format or bigger. Believe it or not but i have a nikon coolscan sitting under my desk. i somehow lost my desktop with the raid controller when i moved. i have no idea how one loses a complete computer but i did. slowly been putting an older system together that could run the old scanner, but well video keeps getting in the way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Castorp said:

Would love a Leica M9 but frankly there is no such thing as a digital camera that is like film, or like shooting film. 

12 frames. A week or a month until you get to see what’s on there. The joy of pulling the wet film out of the tank and seeing rich beautiful negatives. Lowering a carefully printed silver gelatine into selenium and seeing dmax intensify and then tones split off into plum and rust. 

The physicality of it all. The picture is really a picture straight away right there on the film. There’s a magic to that realness. 

Well like I said, to me it is the closest -shooting wise- by the way I still own and shoot film on a FM2, Yashica T5 P&S but I don't develop/scan.

I went on a 5-day family trip to Italy with only one 16gb card, no laptop/SD reader. Had to manage the pics carefully with no real idea if I nailed exposure/composition until after the trip (again the LCD is a joke, worthless in daylight). Leica even has digital M models with the back LCD completely removed and a film advance level.

Tangibly-Unique-1512-x-1008_teaser-658x4

Of course it isn't real analog but in contrast to the latest gen mirrorless cams, the Leica M's are a total throwback..

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah film has some charisma that digital cant replicate. it wouldn't surprise me if film even made something  of a resurgeance. All it will take is one dude or dudette to do something amazing with it and everyone will jump back on the bandwagon so to speak ( ok maybe not everyone ) the expense of film compared to digital  will prohibit that but you get the idea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s not necessarily more or less expensive. Competitive quality inkjet prints are not cheap.

A Nikon F90X, one of the best SLR’s, can be had for 50€ in great condition. Pair it with a used 50 1.8D and you have an amazing camera for around a hundred quid. 

That leaves you with hundreds of of euros left to spend on film and prints. All in all perfectly possible to make work for an entire exhibition for under 1000€. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...