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DayRaven

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  1. Like
    DayRaven got a reaction from Geoff CB in Sony A6300 review (rolling) - Striking image but nagging issues   
    It's a combination of things -
    1. Sony cameras don't handle difficult white balance situations with any grace
    2. Sony offer a huge degree of options that control the sensor
    3. Sony give you profiles that require grading - and I mean, proper, years of experience as a colourist grading, not just drop on a lut or tweak sat and curves
    Combine this with low prices and any tom, dick or harry can grab one, stick it in pp9, wave it around a baby with leds, sunlight and an incandescent bulb and wonder what happened to the skin
    They aren't cameras for everyone, thats for sure, you can mitigate many of the issues, but they are cameras that demand, in certain modes, a very high degree of cameramanship and skill.
    1. Desaturating the higher luminence can work wonders to help take the green and yellow gills away.
    2. Stick to pp0, and your fave creative style, if that's too limiting, stick to cine 4, s.gamut.cine. If that's ever too limiting, then you are going to have to start reading technical documentation to understand what the options do and how they do it.
    3. Just look at the size of s.gamut 3, and think what is going to happen when you cram all of that into the comparitively tiny space of 709 and understand why colourists can charge what they do. Then never, ever use it.
    Or just grab a camera you can get decent results with because clever engineers did all that for you and plenty more besides
  2. Like
    DayRaven reacted to Viet Bach Bui in I am depressed by the lack of articles on this blog.   
    It would be nice if this blog/forum became a place for hobbyists like myself to discuss the art of making a good film/video rather than a place where people bicker over gear choices. I know there's a subforum for that here already but to post there would be like posting in the Video forum at DPReview. If you're tired of gear, why not shift the focus to what you can do with it?
  3. Like
    DayRaven reacted to Eric Matyas in Free Music Resource   
    Hi everyone,
    I have a site up with free music that you can use in your videos. It's all original...all my own work. All I ask is to be credited as indicated on my homepage:
    http://soundimage.org/
    I sincerely hope my tracks are helpful. Any and all feedback is welcome and always appreciated.
    All the best,
    Eric
     
     
  4. Like
    DayRaven reacted to Jimmy in Requesting a 4K 5D Mark IV! Werner meets Canon in Germany   
    Then I would need a stills camera too.
    Why can't people grasp that everyone's needs are different and there is no perfect camera for every single job?
  5. Like
    DayRaven reacted to Andrew Reid in Requesting a 4K 5D Mark IV! Werner meets Canon in Germany   
    4K is the standard of 2016 and future proof.
    Furthermore 4K is the only way to get true 1080p or 2K res out of a DSLR or mirrorless camera. None of the 1080p cameras shoot 1080p. It's just a sticker on the box. They are really shooting a pixel binned or line skipped image. The exception are the full sensor readout 1080p cameras like the A7S which down-sample better on the image processor, but shooting 4K is still preferable over this as it's future proof. In most situations you also have to shoot 4K to avoid severe moire & aliasing.
    So in short, 4K was necessary to move us on from the crappy line-skipping and moire era of DSLR video.
    It's not so much a resolution obsession, even if you deliver 1080p, it helps to have your acquisition quality 4K.
    Now we have two kinds of 4K... that from a full sensor readout is preferable for the full lens circle to get used, whilst a crop of the sensor readout is a stop-gap until the sensor & image processor tech gets better - although sometimes it has its benefits - like a Super 35mm mode on a full frame camera, and 1.3x crop (1D C) doesn't hurt as much as a 2.3!
    True, rolling shutter and heat issues can occasionally bite you on some of the lower end models, but it's still in the most part preferable to have some kind of technological progress than none. Without progress, we wouldn't get through this early phase of imperfect 4K and onto better things.
    The only times I avoid 4K these days is if I am shooting hours and hours of live footage and need very small file sizes, or the other aspects of the image outweigh the benefits of the alternative 4K cameras for a particular project - such as full frame RAW on the 5D Mark III with magic lantern for the best colour and keying, or high frame rate 120fps 1080p which can be lovely for certain things.
  6. Like
    DayRaven reacted to DPStewart in Aputure: the Blackmagic of lighting   
    I am currently using 2 Aputure 672s lights on lightweight 10' stands with 43" shoot-through umbrellas mounted for SERIOUS run-and-gun stuff... I mean like we have from 10-minutes to maybe 30-minutes to get the shots before we get either nailed by security or flat out arrested.
    The guy carrying BOTH light fixtures may even have to climb over fences, etc.,

    Using these Aputures was the only way this was going to work. And it surely does work. Killer. 
     
  7. Like
    DayRaven reacted to Jonesy Jones in Aputure: the Blackmagic of lighting   
    I say that because BM has been making amazing professional level cameras for a few years now, at prices that most of us can afford. And now Aputure is doing the same for us with lighting, as well as some other products. I love Blackmagic, and I love Aputure.
    I already owned an Aputure Lightstorm LS-1S, and I love it, and I was able to get a hands on look at some of their other products.
    Lightstorm LS-1S - $700 - (I’ll start with this one as it’s the one I own and have experience with, and the others won’t be as thorough.) The ’S’ I believe is for spot, it’s very directional. It comes with diffusion paper that you can clip onto the fixture to soften the light and spread it out a bit, I use a shower curtain as well. 4 barn doors give you some control there too. The fixture is listed at 95 CRI. I believe it puts out 1K equivalent at 5500K. It’s dimmable from 25%-100%. In my tests I found 25%-50% was about a 2 stop increase, and then 50-75 and then 75-100 were a 1 stop increase each…. roughly. I love the controller box personally. It also comes with a remote that is probably very handy, but also easy to lose. I’ve basically given in to the fact that I will lose it. Everything feels very well built and solid… very much so. There’s a Sony v-mount one and AB one. I’ve not used this feature, but could come in handy in a pinch. The collar is solid an easily goes on a stand. 
    All in all I couldn’t be happier with this light. You want a solid professional looking light that provides a bunch of high quality light, and this thing delivers, and would cost 3-4 times as much if anyone else were selling them. The low price is NOT indicative of the fixture’s quality. Honestly, their price is not low, everyone else’s is high, and I am happy to pay the legit price. I have done A LOT of research on building LED light fixtures and have made a half dozen of my own. I know what can be made for the $. Everyone else has been cheating us. Aputure got it right. 
    Lightstorm LS-1C - $700 - I believe the ‘C’ is for color?… because you can vary the color temp from 3200-5500. Basically copy/paste everything else from above except that there is a 10%-20% hit to the output for the vari-temp feature. I was actually concerned about this and so I was sure to check this out at NAB. And after a super scientific test of shining both the 1S and 1C directly into my eyes, I can confidently say that they both burned my retinas about the same… I didn’t notice a difference. Also, I’ve heard there can be noticeable lighting patterns with bi-color lights. I forgot to pay attention to this but I’ve read that these lights don’t exhibit this. 
    One thing that Aputure has not provided us with is a case. However, Jeremy Gay from Aputure showed me this cool solution, and also a nice soft box that was designed for a slightly larger fixture but still works for the 1S and 1C. 
    Lightstorm 120t - $585 - I believe this one starts shipping in May. Right now it only comes in tungsten, but in a few months there should be a daylight version, and apparently a bi-color (though I don’t see how that is possible on this fixture). This one has a 97 CRI, I wonder if the daylight one will as well. It produces 1.5K. The cool thing about this fixture is they have created a couple accessories you can add to it. I’ve added some photos below. I am particularly interested in the soft box. The 120t is super light, but just a heads up the chasis is very thin. I don’t know that it’s a bad thing, but it doesn’t feel as solid as the LS-1S/C. It uses the same control box as the LS-1S/C. Again, a super powerful high quality low cost LED light. Personally, I’ll be more interested when the daylight ones start shipping.
    LS-C20 - $200 - This one should start shipping in September. It produces the equivalent of a 120 watt fixture, with a draw of 30. It has a color temp of I think like 7000 and is designed to use filters to change the temp or color. It is focusable from 12 to 47 degrees, has barn doors. It has some cool power options, and feels more solid than the 120t. I think this could be an essential light for my kit, especially for that price. 
    D3 - $290 - This is a mic, and it is aimed at being a very affordable competitor to the Senn 416. They had this mic and the 416 set up right next to each other so that you could compare the two. And honestly, I’d say it’s a worthy competitor, VERY worthy. It’s got a super record level, nice sound, and great directionality. Ok. Let’s say the 416 nudges out the D3, maybe. But its like 90% of the quality for 10% (well maybe 30%) of the price. It’s an awesome mic, fo rizzle. If your looking to buy a new mic in the near future, don’t overlook the D3. I think this one starts shipping this Fall. 
    As we already know, they make some great monitors, and had some cool lavs on display as well. I didn’t take the time I probably should have with these other products, but after my experience with the above, I would have no worries regarding quality with any current or future Aputure product (but of course always do your homework). 
    Ok. I’m sleepy tired. Really got to go. Eyes are closing. Hopefully this was informative. 





  8. Like
    DayRaven got a reaction from IronFilm in Kinefinity 2016 Nian new product launches   
    MattH, no-one has any issues with your skepticism, in fact I think we all really rather agree that it is sensible to wait until we can see the results of the camera, and it's support network. DBounce however was not being skeptical. His gambit is that Kinefinity are conterfeiting prores, as evidenced by his link to a federal counterfeiting website, on the basis that they are a chinese company. "China doesn't need permission do they?" When everyone pointed out that his evidence was shaky, and the full picture indicates that they are in a convoluted process of getting the licence legally, (which has now been confirmed to be the case by Kinefinity) he went quiet. that was until he saw the rotated buttons, when this became evidence of their poor quality control. In my opinion that's just as bad as not being skeptical - either being a fan or a hater of an unreleased product are just as bad as each other.
    If I were to apply skeptical thinking to DBounce, I would suggest he has been prone to jump to conclusions, and make somewhat xenophobic statements, thus when he states an opinion about a chinese company, my skepticism tells me not to take his opinion at face value and triple check his evidence.
    We all know you don't get to see Apples, Nikons, Canons or Samsungs  pre-production models, they employ consultants and maybe even have departments dedicated  to hiding pre-production electronics whilst they are being tested at that level. Remember the preproduction iPhone that someone snapped being used on a train? It looked like crap and they got a roasting in the clickbait press for it. Try to find that picture now. They pursued every copy of that photo that was published with c&d letters, because they know it looked like crap. Is that really what we want kinefinity to be doing, because that little skeptical part of me tells me that if DBounce found out that Kinefinity was trying to hide their pre-production flaws, he would be presenting this as evidence that they couldn't be trusted.
  9. Like
    DayRaven reacted to DBounce in Kinefinity 2016 Nian new product launches   
    Fyi: It's $9k for the Terra 6k Pro Pack. I think a lot of the folks that have nothing but praise also really are not potential customers. People seriously considering this camera will be discriminating. And QC is very important as it is directly tied to reliability.
  10. Like
  11. Like
    DayRaven reacted to Hans Punk in Kinefinity 2016 Nian new product launches   
    The buttons are really the 'pressing' issue. 
  12. Like
    DayRaven reacted to Jonesy Jones in Kinefinity hands on at NAB 2016   
    These are the questions and responses I have gotten so far. If you have more let me know.
    Are there plans to expand their international sales channel and expand dealership of their cameras? Yes, in discussion with distributors at this time. Already in Europe hdvideoshop.com. How do English speaking countries get support for the cameras (with a language barrier?) Apparently they will use a distributor for that.  Do they have a license to use ProRes and if not, when do they expect to get it? Prores license comes in parts apparently, and they have some parts of the license, but not all, working on final part. Does the global/rolling switchable shutter work in any protoypes/models? If so, is there a significant quality difference? Still working on global shutter switch, other than DR almost the same quality in global. Is there any loss in quality using Hi Speed modes, and if so, what will be compromised? (Resolution, noise, moire, aliasing). 1-2 stop loss in HFR, cab compensate a bit with ISO reduction Is every frame rate/resolution on the cameras available in both Raw and ProRes? yes, all resolutions and slo mo What is the functionality of the KineGrip? How long can a Sony battery power the camera for via the grip? Still working on Kinegrip, not here at NAB. 1.5 hours, res dependent How long does the Terra take to boot? 10-20 seconds How much more weight will the KineBACK and regular V-lock add to the overall camera? They didn't have an answer. Maybe they'll let me take it off the working model. What is the native ISO? 800 HFR 400 If I was to pre-order the camera, when can I expect to receive it? Summer/autumn, but someone else said a month, but I would lean toward Fall 2016 for the 5K, just my impression. What cost are we looking at if I order the camera with a Kinemount and an extra adapter? (Like EF or PL)? 5k $5000 body-$7000 package, 6K $6000 body-$8000 package, they're speed booster/enhancer is $300. Does the 6k model have a 5k mode? If so, why not? probably not, don't know why. Are lower resolutions and Hi-Speed modes crops of the sensor or can they be used with the full Super35 image area? windowed for raw, full frame for Prores, though at launch will be crop/windowed and will add full sensor readout later in firmware. What is included in the Wi-Fi functionality? What can we control? Every setting can be controlled with iPad, works now, iPhone and android still developing OLPF? internal OLPF, but not interchangeable Buttons? The feel legit, but you can press and rotate them.   So that's why they looked crooked. But he specifically said they were preproduction buttons and this won't be an issue on production models. Overall. The camera looks and feels pro status. Solid, but light. Fan is nearly silent, but the camera isn't recording. Haven't seen it record yet. I've only seen the 6K, since they are just using the sensor from the Kinemax. RS looked bad on the screen, but could that be a combo of refresh lag? 5K will be same size and weight as 6K. They don't have most of their accessories here, so it's hard to judge those.  Ok. I'll probably look at all the comments and ask more questions later. Let me know. I'm also trying to convince them to let me borrow a unit to test. Wish me luck.
     




  13. Like
    DayRaven reacted to dbp in James Miller deLUTS are awesome   
    As soon as you get into heavily stylized grades, there's going to be a large degree of subjectivity. Still fun to discuss, though.
    When stylized grading is done well, I like it. But 95% of the time with stuff I see online, it looks hokey and I think the footage would've looked better with a more natural (albeit safe) look. It's risky for sure.
     
    edit: It's often done well with higher budget/hollywood stuff. I think it's because there's a specific plan and reason. The art direction, color palette are all designed to compliment the grade. Whereas with random online stuff, it's just some LUT thrown on to random footage with no real plan. 
  14. Like
    DayRaven reacted to Ivanhurba in I'll be at NAB, what would you like me to check out?   
    If you can get by Blackmagic and ask them about the Quicktime dismisal and what are they going to do about it It would be great!
  15. Like
    DayRaven reacted to MountneerMan in I'll be at NAB, what would you like me to check out?   
    If you could go by the Samsung booth and just say.... What the Fuck guys.... WHAT THE FUCK lol.
    Apparently they do have a booth so if you could go by there and take some pictures of the professional broadcast level fridge camera that would be great. Thanks
  16. Like
    DayRaven reacted to AaronChicago in Blackmagic View Assist 4K records 4K ProRes to SD card for just $895   
    Here's what I think is happening. Blackmagic is definitely working on a new camera, but instead of announcing now and hoping to ship later this year, they'll announce at NAB 2017 and ship immediately.
  17. Like
    DayRaven reacted to Mattias Burling in Kinefinity 2016 Nian new product launches   
    Its just the caps, if the "Buttons where misaligned" I would expect them to not sit in a straight line from one another. The top part of pretty much any button is just a labled cap that is put on last. Either its snapped or glued in the wrong orientation or it might spin. Who knows, but the important parts of the buttons are on a straight line. So its a super easy fix for them that require zero engineering knowledge.
    Yes, I think its very obvious to everyone that you are very very skeptical and one might even say against this camera
    Me, I will stick to not judging for or against until I've used it myself.
  18. Like
    DayRaven got a reaction from Shield3 in Canon 80D video quality still atrocious   
    That's a REALLY wierd species of Canna if the Canon has the best colour here - it look's like it was the one grown in the radioactive wasteland!
  19. Like
    DayRaven reacted to enny in Craft Camera is coming!   
    Lets see camera spec then first used in the field and then some, before asking for money
    For 29.99 you guys can have this bad boy

  20. Like
    DayRaven got a reaction from dafreaking in Sony A6300 review (rolling) - Striking image but nagging issues   
    The 4k image is nice, and hard to beat at any price range, but it's the overheating. I've never had my camera overheat, even under stress testing, so good copies do exist, but I would be dishonest to suggest that the chance of getting a good one is even close to acceptable. There are tricks you can do with ram heatsinks, and similar, especially if you can cope with the articulating screen losing it's articulation, but how many times are you going to tolerate it overheating at a wedding? It depends I guess on how you use it - if it's strictly a camera where it's nice if it gets something, but you never rely on it to get the product absolutely perfect, then why not, but if you think that it could let you down even once, well, it's up to you!
  21. Like
    DayRaven got a reaction from Blue Fox in I still don't understand WB!   
    It's not quite differently for each object - your brain can correct zones differently, but it's not great at it, and things like hormone levels can affect it greatly, a simple fight or flight state can turn your vision black and white in some zones!
    Definately think twice, depending on your sensitivity to WB issues, it's not really reliable, and it sounds like you are sensitive to them
    Try to get it perfect for you in camera, especially with 8bits, but don't expect everyone else to see perfect for you as perfect for them! Even when you're trying to shoot a realistic scene colourwise, you're still making artistic decisions, especially with the limitations of technology and some people just have slightly different expectations of correct WB.
    It's definately worth investing in a colour card with fleshtone panels on it to play with, set up a few scenes, lit different ways with the card in it, so you can see and get a feel for how your camera handles your white balance adjustments - experience and practice is the real key
  22. Like
    DayRaven got a reaction from sgreszcz in I still don't understand WB!   
    Imagine you have a card that is a theoritical perfect white. Any visible wavelength which strikes the card is reflected, none are absorbed.
    The sunshine has only a few wavelengths missing or reduced, so let's say photons with wavelengths R-O-Y-G-B-I-V (Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Indigo & Violet) leave the sun.
    They then strike our atmosphere. As we know, by looking, the atmosphere scatters blue more than red, but at noon, the sun passes relatively little atmosphere before hitting your eyes, so at noon, the full compliment of ROYGBIV hits your card and bounces into your camera
    Now, it's nighttime. Very little light from the sun is around, so you switch on your lights at home. These lights are incandescent, or maybe an energy saver bulb made to replicate the yellow light incandecsents produce .The light is giving out red, orange, yellow and green in equal proportions to the sun, but it isn't producing as much blue, indigo and violet. Thus we can write that it gives out ROYGbiv.
    You bring your theoretical card indoors, turn on the lights and it reflects ROYGbiv. Less of the "cooler colours".
    You look at the card. Our brains are very clever, it automatically balances the picture, you know the card is supposed to be white, so your brain makes it white. Out of the corner of your eye, you see someone walk past your window. They look blue, the whole world looks blue, an anonamly of this automatic white balance.
    We point the camera at our card. Our camera is in manual mode and is not so clever, it sees, bouncing off the card ROYGbiv. If you had put a yellow card in front of it in the noon sun, it would have also seen ROYGbiv bouncing from it. As our camera is in manual mode, it does not understand the context of the picture. It has no cultural reference or memory of this card being white, it displays it as yellow because it sees less biv and more ROYG.
    Fortunately, our camera has an adjustment, so we can set a temperature. Skip the part where the scale we use is derived from black body radiation, just know, we can set our camera to be more sensitive to blue or red, and we tell it how sensitive to be to either with a scale measured in kelvin.
    We know our indoors light is producing a temperature of 2800K, so when we set our camera to that, our white card looks white again.
    However, when we take it back out into the noon sun the next day, our camera setting is telling it to be especially sensitive to blues (because our bulb was producing few blues), so our image looks blue. We dial it back up to 5600K and at this point, it is balancing the sensitivity of blues and reds equally. The image looks correct again.
    -----
    I know you know most of that, but it's important to understand that the reality is, there are wavelengths of light missing, our brains compensate for that but the sensor of the camers shows what is really there. When this gets passed to the processors for processing, a white balances is applied, this is part and parcel of turning electronic voltages into colours. When you look at the screen on the camera, your white balanced eye sees the output of the monitor, and your brain is both clever enough to not confuse what you see on screen with the real object and stupid enough to try to WB to that in the section of your vision that the screen occupies. Badly. Also, the screen being yet another light source with it's own colour temperature just adds to the brains problems. As you have noticed, this is not reliable and, if you spend a long time looking through a viewfinder, the output of that eye is adjusted to compensate, similarly, if you ask people who have watched a movie with a strong colour cast throughout, they often didn't notice it because their eyes adjusted after a few minutes. That doesn't mean that you will be able to balance them to each other though - theoretically yes, if you can hold attention rigidly on both objects simultaneously without anything else moving in your field of view, but the reality is, this is an impossible thing to work towards.
    Basically, don't trust what you see, your brain is working against you by trying to work for you!
    As for the best method, well, the most accurate is to have a good lightmeter and a grey card, and use it religiously, every shot. The most convienient is to stick it in auto wb. You can greycard your camera and use it's inbuilt metering system, you can adjust the WB only when the lighting changes drastically. I expect there are more methods, these are the ones that work for me, depending on how important quality is, how quick I need to be etc. And, yes, the whole point of a grey card is to give your camera a surface with no colouration of it's own to bounce every wavelength accurately to be metered - it's trying to be our theoretically perfect card. They can be suprisingly expensive, but as we've learnt, we can't trust our eyes when they tell us that the piece of paper we are using is white - it may be slightly yellow, it may be slightly blue, even if we see it as the purest white and that's going to screw us over by a couple of hundred K.
    Don't try to go for reality either, for starters, actual reality looks terrible and none of us can see it, secondly, we all develop our internal WB differently, with variation depending on our genes and our upbringing, and reality for us changes constantly over time as well as our brain constantly adjusts. Go for what looks good to you on the day.
  23. Like
    DayRaven reacted to Andrew Reid in Zacuto shrink the EVF - Gratical Eye available soon for $1950   
    That is 2700dpi on a panel that size dude. Why would you need more?
  24. Like
    DayRaven got a reaction from Blue Fox in I still don't understand WB!   
    Imagine you have a card that is a theoritical perfect white. Any visible wavelength which strikes the card is reflected, none are absorbed.
    The sunshine has only a few wavelengths missing or reduced, so let's say photons with wavelengths R-O-Y-G-B-I-V (Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Indigo & Violet) leave the sun.
    They then strike our atmosphere. As we know, by looking, the atmosphere scatters blue more than red, but at noon, the sun passes relatively little atmosphere before hitting your eyes, so at noon, the full compliment of ROYGBIV hits your card and bounces into your camera
    Now, it's nighttime. Very little light from the sun is around, so you switch on your lights at home. These lights are incandescent, or maybe an energy saver bulb made to replicate the yellow light incandecsents produce .The light is giving out red, orange, yellow and green in equal proportions to the sun, but it isn't producing as much blue, indigo and violet. Thus we can write that it gives out ROYGbiv.
    You bring your theoretical card indoors, turn on the lights and it reflects ROYGbiv. Less of the "cooler colours".
    You look at the card. Our brains are very clever, it automatically balances the picture, you know the card is supposed to be white, so your brain makes it white. Out of the corner of your eye, you see someone walk past your window. They look blue, the whole world looks blue, an anonamly of this automatic white balance.
    We point the camera at our card. Our camera is in manual mode and is not so clever, it sees, bouncing off the card ROYGbiv. If you had put a yellow card in front of it in the noon sun, it would have also seen ROYGbiv bouncing from it. As our camera is in manual mode, it does not understand the context of the picture. It has no cultural reference or memory of this card being white, it displays it as yellow because it sees less biv and more ROYG.
    Fortunately, our camera has an adjustment, so we can set a temperature. Skip the part where the scale we use is derived from black body radiation, just know, we can set our camera to be more sensitive to blue or red, and we tell it how sensitive to be to either with a scale measured in kelvin.
    We know our indoors light is producing a temperature of 2800K, so when we set our camera to that, our white card looks white again.
    However, when we take it back out into the noon sun the next day, our camera setting is telling it to be especially sensitive to blues (because our bulb was producing few blues), so our image looks blue. We dial it back up to 5600K and at this point, it is balancing the sensitivity of blues and reds equally. The image looks correct again.
    -----
    I know you know most of that, but it's important to understand that the reality is, there are wavelengths of light missing, our brains compensate for that but the sensor of the camers shows what is really there. When this gets passed to the processors for processing, a white balances is applied, this is part and parcel of turning electronic voltages into colours. When you look at the screen on the camera, your white balanced eye sees the output of the monitor, and your brain is both clever enough to not confuse what you see on screen with the real object and stupid enough to try to WB to that in the section of your vision that the screen occupies. Badly. Also, the screen being yet another light source with it's own colour temperature just adds to the brains problems. As you have noticed, this is not reliable and, if you spend a long time looking through a viewfinder, the output of that eye is adjusted to compensate, similarly, if you ask people who have watched a movie with a strong colour cast throughout, they often didn't notice it because their eyes adjusted after a few minutes. That doesn't mean that you will be able to balance them to each other though - theoretically yes, if you can hold attention rigidly on both objects simultaneously without anything else moving in your field of view, but the reality is, this is an impossible thing to work towards.
    Basically, don't trust what you see, your brain is working against you by trying to work for you!
    As for the best method, well, the most accurate is to have a good lightmeter and a grey card, and use it religiously, every shot. The most convienient is to stick it in auto wb. You can greycard your camera and use it's inbuilt metering system, you can adjust the WB only when the lighting changes drastically. I expect there are more methods, these are the ones that work for me, depending on how important quality is, how quick I need to be etc. And, yes, the whole point of a grey card is to give your camera a surface with no colouration of it's own to bounce every wavelength accurately to be metered - it's trying to be our theoretically perfect card. They can be suprisingly expensive, but as we've learnt, we can't trust our eyes when they tell us that the piece of paper we are using is white - it may be slightly yellow, it may be slightly blue, even if we see it as the purest white and that's going to screw us over by a couple of hundred K.
    Don't try to go for reality either, for starters, actual reality looks terrible and none of us can see it, secondly, we all develop our internal WB differently, with variation depending on our genes and our upbringing, and reality for us changes constantly over time as well as our brain constantly adjusts. Go for what looks good to you on the day.
  25. Like
    DayRaven reacted to Jonesy Jones in Kinefinity 2016 Nian new product launches   
    I really hope Kinefinity turns out to be great because it is depressing reading the latest on BM's UM46. In the past BM has eventually sorted it out, but it doesn't seem great at the moment. I will love it if Kinefinity turns out to be a solid solution. I am going to talk these guy's ears off next week. Maybe BM will have some good news too.
    Btw, which model are you thinking? I'm looking at the Terra 6k. But the rolling shutter on their other cams seems horrendous. They're claiming this has been addressed... we'll see.
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