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what about an old steadycam


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hello, i am thinking to buy an old steadycam. like glidecam hd2000 with my xt3. Because i don t use it so often and because of price, now they are cheap, and more easy to use( i mean no battery and less room), i am thinking can be better of a gimbal. I have already a Digislider Pro Carbon Fibre DSLR Camera Stabilizer (it is the same then the CAME one), but when i tried to set it up with my panasonic gh3 i could never succed to get a very good balance, though it seems a good device. I thought i might depend on the stabilizer, so i think if i get a glidecam or similar i might get it to work properly. What is your opinion about?

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Steadycam and Glidecam, although somewhat similar, are two different type of stabilizers. Your Digislider Pro Carbon Fibre looks very similar to a small glidecam, so my guess is that you would have similar issues.

Steadycams and Glidecams can work pretty well, but needs a lot more practice than a gimbal. I've got a gimbal and a Steadycam... but in reality I use tripods for everything.

 

 

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you said it right, i also use almost everytime the tripod or a monopod. That is why oi dont want to invest in a gimbal. I know that a steady will require more effort than a gimbal, but i am stucked in a previuius step..the setup. After setup i know i come another hard part, the learning of using it...

If i just could set it up properly, would be a good starting.i am thinking...may be the gh3 was too light for that steady?xt3 is heavier..could be setup better?

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Steadicam copies often don't as many ways to adjust your balance, haven't been a big fan of any of the ones I've used. If I buy another "steadicam" it will be from Steadicam. Of course you pay a premium for it. The other issue is steadicam's are made to be used with a lot of weight. The more the better really. Something like an XT3 is extremely light. You'll have a much easier time with a gimbal. 

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9 minutes ago, TomTheDP said:

Steadicam copies often don't as many ways to adjust your balance, haven't been a big fan of any of the ones I've used. If I buy another "steadicam" it will be from Steadicam. Of course you pay a premium for it. The other issue is steadicam's are made to be used with a lot of weight. The more the better really. Something like an XT3 is extremely light. You'll have a much easier time with a gimbal. 

yes i agree much easier with gimbal--but as i said for the use i do of it too muche money..

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3 minutes ago, stefanocps said:

yes i agree much easier with gimbal--but as i said for the use i do of it too muche money..

Yeah but you may end up not being happy with the results and wasting your money. I'd definitely find ways to add weight to the rig. If you can get it to around 4-5 pounds you'll probably be in good shape. You might still have a hard time getting precise movements with it, especially as an inexperienced operator. Gimbals end up saving a lot of money as they essentially negate the need for a very experienced and very expensive steadicam operator. Of course a steadicam can do things a gimbal can't but for lower end stuff a gimbal is just the way to go. 

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I learned how to use a cheap glide-cam rig a long time ago.  I kind of love it.  Works like a champ.  Never easy, but 100% reliable.  It's just metal, joints, hinges, and counter weights.  You'd have to run it over with a car to destroy it.  

And you're right, for the few times I pull it and use it, it delivers the goods.  Ain't that all you need from it? 

Also, there's an argument for having a piece of gear that will do something well, but is somewhat of a PITA to use; I find that it keeps you "honest" visually.  Do I REALLY want/need a floaty shot here?  Is that visually mission critical for the project?  If yes, then lug out the heavy glide-cam rig.  If not, then leave it alone. 

I have a colleague that spent thousands on gimball stuff.... guess what almost all his footage looks like now?  It looks novel, granted...but I'm not sold on it.  Feels like an lazy aesthetic style of this era....like bell bottom jeans; fun while they're around, but a little cringy looking back on it once everyone moves on from it.

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as i said i have this Digislider Pro Carbon Fibre DSLR Camera Stabilizer, for me was not too bad ad a device, don't know if a glidecam can be better...i am talinkg about the manageability when setting it up. Does anyone have suggestion or link on how to get a proper balance for a steady?

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On 1/30/2021 at 4:23 AM, stefanocps said:

as i said i have this Digislider Pro Carbon Fibre DSLR Camera Stabilizer, for me was not too bad ad a device, don't know if a glidecam can be better...i am talinkg about the manageability when setting it up. Does anyone have suggestion or link on how to get a proper balance for a steady?

A lot of the better tutorials I've found are for higher end gimbals which allow a lot more fine tuning. The usual suggestion I've seen is to hold the gimbal horizontally and drop it. The time it takes to drop should be about 3 seconds. It's just a matter of adding the right amount of weight on the bottom and making sure the camera/lens's weight is in the dead center. 

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1 hour ago, TomTheDP said:

A lot of the better tutorials I've found are for higher end gimbals which allow a lot more fine tuning. The usual suggestion I've seen is to hold the gimbal horizontally and drop it. The time it takes to drop should be about 3 seconds. It's just a matter of adding the right amount of weight on the bottom and making sure the camera/lens's weight is in the dead center. 

if you have good video to link ..please! thanks

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Both gimbals and steadicams have their place for sure, very different purposes and looks with some crossover. I directed a TV show were we had to follow around hosts and guests doing things for hours at a time, never would have worked with a steadicam, but was great with a gimbal setup on a backpack arm system. But on the other side, steadicams and get a specific look that gimbals really can't...just depends if you want hyper smooth planned shots (steadicam) or more reliability for longer periods (good gimbal setup) 

 

If you are going for a Glidecam or something for your xt3 though, make sure you get one that will work with a smaller camera. A lot of the older ones are intended for heavier setups and won't really work for what you want. 

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2 hours ago, Benjamin Hilton said:

Both gimbals and steadicams have their place for sure, very different purposes and looks with some crossover. I directed a TV show were we had to follow around hosts and guests doing things for hours at a time, never would have worked with a steadicam, but was great with a gimbal setup on a backpack arm system. But on the other side, steadicams and get a specific look that gimbals really can't...just depends if you want hyper smooth planned shots (steadicam) or more reliability for longer periods (good gimbal setup) 

 

If you are going for a Glidecam or something for your xt3 though, make sure you get one that will work with a smaller camera. A lot of the older ones are intended for heavier setups and won't really work for what you want. 

that's th epoint..i was trying to understand what steadycam would work with xt3

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If size and cost aren't limiting factors, I'd go steadicam vest+arm & gimbal.

Balancing a gimbal is easier than a steadicam. Steadicam arm+vest eliminate some of the fatigue and helps smooth out z-axis bounce.

😄 you could even be as cool as this guy 👇🏽... slapping on a monitor, with no wires or batteries... hauling 15lbs of gear to stabilize a heavy ass sony A6XXX. lmfao wtf is even going on in this pic?! 🤣

 1170188094_Steadimate-Banner-2-1-1(1).thumb.jpg.ddb2879ddc4b90d43e4934d73cb97aea.jpg

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