Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Palpet

Serious Intel processor bug found. Fix will slow down your computer.

Recommended Posts

EOSHD Pro Color for Sony cameras EOSHD Pro LOG for Sony CamerasEOSHD C-LOG and Film Profiles for All Canon DSLRs
3 hours ago, dahlfors said:

This is bad for hosting, servers, cloud services etc. The nature of this bug and the fix for it won't have any serious speed impact on normal client computer usage, like gaming, video editing etc.

And you are basing this on...

I see nothing but confusion and vague statements on the internet.  There is literally a decade worth of processors out there used in all kinds of configurations and applications.  I read a statement that different chips will experience different degrees of impact.  I haven't seen anyone say gaming and video editing on all systems is out of the woods.  Is there an article that clears those areas on all machines?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I think that it is a really serious issue, but there are a lot of panic mode posts about it.

Example: Intel sourced a tool to run in your computer which detects if it is affected by the Meltdown bug. Downloaded and ran it in my crappy Chinese tablet with Atom processor and Windows 10, which never (and probably never will) receive a firmware update from the shitty manufacturer. Windows 10 was not patched for it yet. And the Intel test said my computer was NOT affected by the bug.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Damphousse said:

And you are basing this on...

I see nothing but confusion and vague statements on the internet.  There is literally a decade worth of processors out there used in all kinds of configurations and applications.  I read a statement that different chips will experience different degrees of impact.  I haven't seen anyone say gaming and video editing on all systems is out of the woods.  Is there an article that clears those areas on all machines?

Yeah if it slows gaming down 30% I would say that is a pretty Big Deal!.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is the complete list of affected cpu

https://www.pcworld.com/article/3245508/components-processors/intel-responds-to-the-cpu-kernel-bug.html

basically every i core and atom got affected, only netburst architecture aka Pentium 4 not affected (core 2 series get affected too according to Linux kernel test)

 

gotta get that ryzen upgrade sooner than i expected

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, webrunner5 said:

True. And I just heard it goes all the way back to 1995!!

That covers just about every server and old home and newer computer still going I bet.

Wow! That's more than reported earlier for sure. 

5 hours ago, andrgl said:

lol ? 1) You seem to think it's ok to mock the scientific process that examines evidence as it comes to hand and re-evaluates on the basis of it. Rather, your lol suggests that you either get something right or you can be mocked and laughed at. You can do better. 

2) I've been reading commentary on the register article that clarified many of the knee-jerk points made in it. 

3) The recent extent article with Intel released list is certainly more extensive than info I've seen elsewhere. Interesting!

4) 

Quote

The performance impact of the patches is expected to be at frustrating levels—somewhere between 0 and 30 percent, though “average” PC users are expected to see little impact.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 04/01/2018 at 6:47 PM, Damphousse said:

And you are basing this on...

I see nothing but confusion and vague statements on the internet.  There is literally a decade worth of processors out there used in all kinds of configurations and applications.  I read a statement that different chips will experience different degrees of impact.  I haven't seen anyone say gaming and video editing on all systems is out of the woods.  Is there an article that clears those areas on all machines?

"How bad will it really be? I asked Linux's creator Linus Torvalds, who said: "There's no one number. It will depend on your hardware and on your load. I think 5 percent for a load with a noticeable kernel component (e.g. a database) is roughly in the right ballpark. But if you do micro-benchmarks that really try to stress it, you might see double-digit performance degradation."

http://www.zdnet.com/article/major-linux-redesign-in-the-works-to-deal-with-intel-chip-security-problem/

"Will these fixes slow down my PC or Mac?

It’s complicated, but if you’re not working on intensive tasks, it’s looking like you won’t take much of a hit. 

More recent Intel processors from the Haswell (4th-gen) era onward have a technology called PCID (Process-Context Identifiers) enabled and are said to suffer less of a performance hit. Plus, some applications—most notably virtualization and data center/cloud workloads—are affected more than others. Intel confirmed that the performance loss will be dependent on workload, and “should not be significant” for average home computer users."

https://www.pcworld.com/article/3245606/security/intel-x86-cpu-kernel-bug-faq-how-it-affects-pc-mac.html

 

---

Basically, the fix for this bug will introduce a delay on memory reads and writes (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kernel_page-table_isolation for a summary of the Linux implementation with links to further reading. Windows/MacOS will most likely implement similar strategies). So, everything that deals with many small (4kB or such) memory reads and writes will have a heavy impact. These kind of memory reads and writes aren't that common with normal application use or gaming. Yes, you will have a performance hit with such applications and gaming too, but likely quite unnoticeable performance hits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing is that Intel has been selling CPUs with this bug for half a year, even tho it has been known for all that time.

Granted AMD is also affected by spectre and have done the same, but there are two different bugs and a LOT of confusion about what is affected by what.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...