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Slowest shutter speed in video mode


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The lowest physically possible shutter speed is determined by the lowest frame rate at 360 degrees. Any longer and the next frame can obviously not expose. So if you have a 24p mode its 1/24th. My guess is that it will be 1/24th or 1/25th on nearly all cameras.  It reminds me of scenes in chunking express, (which can be seen in the trailer), where ambient light at night was obviously too dark for film, so they had to lower the frame rate to get a long enough exposure. Not really needed nowadays because of high iso but it makes a stylistic effect.

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The lowest physically possible shutter speed is determined by the lowest frame rate at 360 degrees. Any longer and the next frame can obviously not expose. So if you have a 24p mode its 1/24th. My guess is that it will be 1/24th or 1/25th on nearly all cameras.  It reminds me of scenes in chunking express, (which can be seen in the trailer), where ambient light at night was obviously too dark for film, so they had to lower the frame rate to get a long enough exposure. Not really needed nowadays because of high iso but it makes a stylistic effect.

Not really. Also for playing with motion. Take a look: https://vimeo.com/135120108 1/4th on A7R M2...

any help on this information for GX8, NX1 and RX10 M2?

please share!

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Not really. Also for playing with motion. Take a look: https://vimeo.com/135120108 1/4th on A7R M2...

any help on this information for GX8, NX1 and RX10 M2?

please share!

well that's low frame rates too. if you're okay with less than 24fps for certain shots, capable cameras can doing slower shutter speeds. I do like the effect. Magic Lantern allows it on Canon dslrs, but I'm not sure of others (apparently a7rii). Thought I'd heard the gh4 could do something like that, but not sure, and not sure how to search for it. you can do it in burst photo mode (sort of)

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Sony allow as slow as 1/4sec at any frame rate.  shooting at 25p and 1/5th sec then speeding it up by 500% gives beautiful low light results for timelapse type stuff.  with the motion blur which is very pleasing for thing slike cars in the dark.  

https://vimeo.com/52579247 

 

A great tip, I never thought of doing it like that!

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Sony allow as slow as 1/4sec at any frame rate.  shooting at 25p and 1/5th sec then speeding it up by 500% gives beautiful low light results for timelapse type stuff.  with the motion blur which is very pleasing for thing slike cars in the dark.  

https://vimeo.com/52579247 

 

Okay and what Sony models?

Kay Lee clicks like. I've asked her but no word if her RX10 M2 does the job... Any RX10 M2 owner to confirm it please?

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Okay and what Sony models?

Kay Lee clicks like. I've asked her but no word if her RX10 M2 does the job... Any RX10 M2 owner to confirm it please?

its kaylee one word lol

ok i checked: on my rx10m2 shutter goes down to 1/4sec for 24fps like rich said, BUT it only goes down to 1/120 in 120fps mode

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its kaylee one word lol

ok i checked: on my rx10m2 shutter goes down to 1/4sec for 24fps like rich said, BUT it only goes down to 1/120 in 120fps mode

for this technique you want less frames per second.  Shooting at 120fps means you will degrade image quality for no reason since each frame will be sharp, and low light benefits no longer apply.

 

 

 for instance, 25p at 1/5th of a second confirms perfectly when sped up to 500% since the 1/5th shutter equates to 5 frames being exposed with one image.  hyperspeed by 500% smooths as if it were 25fps.  

 

shooting 24p and 1/4 sec means you need to speed up by 600% to keep the perfect conformation.  1/4 x 600% = 1/24th sec or 360degree shutter.

 

 

 

this was shot on the humble NEX5n, more than 3 years ago at around 400iso i think.  imagine how clean the a7s would be when in this mode. 

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for this technique you want less frames per second.  Shooting at 120fps means you will degrade image quality for no reason since each frame will be sharp, and low light benefits no longer apply.

 

 

 for instance, 25p at 1/5th of a second confirms perfectly when sped up to 500% since the 1/5th shutter equates to 5 frames being exposed with one image.  hyperspeed by 500% smooths as if it were 25fps.  

 

shooting 24p and 1/4 sec means you need to speed up by 600% to keep the perfect conformation.  1/4 x 600% = 1/24th sec or 360degree shutter.

 

 

 

this was shot on the humble NEX5n, more than 3 years ago at around 400iso i think.  imagine how clean the a7s would be when in this mode. 

im with you rich, this is awesome btw. i just provided that specific info because shooter had messaged me multiple times lol

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There is no such thing as slowing the shutter speed lower than 1/framerate. It's a physical impossibility. Shooting at the lowest video standard frame rate available (23.97p), the lowest shutter you can achieve is 1/23.97s. 

If you want to go for a slower shutter speed, then you have to go for a perfectly matched slower frame rate. 

For example when you choose 1/4s shutter in 24p, your camera is lying to you, it's shooting at 4 frames per seconds not 24p.

I just wanted to make that clear. 

Shooting at a lower frame rate is exclusively timelapse shooting when conformed back to normal frame rate, it's the opposite of slow motion where you shoot at a higher frame rate and conform back to lower.

Any one here with a camera that shoots stills and has timelapse ability or have an intervalometer can achieve what you're discussing here. Shoot 1/4s exposure stills in timelapse mode and you get it. You can even go as low as 1 second shutter and thus be effectively shooting at 1fps. 

Also another option is any canon DSLR with ML installed. You can exactly achieve what the sony's are doing by going into ''frame-rate override" and setting it as low as you need say 4fps, then if you go to the exposure menu you'll be able to go to 1\4s shutter. If you record that, the camera shoots 4 1\4s exposures each second, in ML you can actually go much lower than sony and shoot 5 second exposures (at that you're shooting something like 1/025 fps) and as a bonus in Canon DSLRs it actually conforms the file internally to 24/25p and you end up with a timelapse video just as if you used stills mode and did proper timelapse.

I use it all the time when I want to create timelapse in-camera fast, but if I have the time I'll go the stills way for 4-5K resolution and raw/jpeg quality. 

Anyway shooting at 24p, 1\24s is minimum. Going lower shutter/frame rate is timelapse/undercranking and going higher is slowmotion/overcranking.

(over and under cranking is a term from the film cameras days where we reduced the frame rate by driving the film reel slower with crank to get timelapse and overcranked the film faster than normal to get slowmotion, you're doing the same thing but with more control and digital percision)

 

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There is no such thing as slowing the shutter speed lower than 1/framerate. It's a physical impossibility. Shooting at the lowest video standard frame rate available (23.97p), the lowest shutter you can achieve is 1/23.97s. 

If you want to go for a slower shutter speed, then you have to go for a perfectly matched slower frame rate. 

For example when you choose 1/4s shutter in 24p, your camera is lying to you, it's shooting at 4 frames per seconds not 24p.

I just wanted to make that clear. 

Shooting at a lower frame rate is exclusively timelapse shooting when conformed back to normal frame rate, it's the opposite of slow motion where you shoot at a higher frame rate and conform back to lower.

Any one here with a camera that shoots stills and has timelapse ability or have an intervalometer can achieve what you're discussing here. Shoot 1/4s exposure stills in timelapse mode and you get it. You can even go as low as 1 second shutter and thus be effectively shooting at 1fps. 

Also another option is any canon DSLR with ML installed. You can exactly achieve what the sony's are doing by going into ''frame-rate override" and setting it as low as you need say 4fps, then if you go to the exposure menu you'll be able to go to 1\4s shutter. If you record that, the camera shoots 4 1\4s exposures each second, in ML you can actually go much lower than sony and shoot 5 second exposures (at that you're shooting something like 1/025 fps) and as a bonus in Canon DSLRs it actually conforms the file internally to 24/25p and you end up with a timelapse video just as if you used stills mode and did proper timelapse.

I use it all the time when I want to create timelapse in-camera fast, but if I have the time I'll go the stills way for 4-5K resolution and raw/jpeg quality. 

Anyway shooting at 24p, 1\24s is minimum. Going lower shutter/frame rate is timelapse/undercranking and going higher is slowmotion/overcranking.

(over and under cranking is a term from the film cameras days where we reduced the frame rate by driving the film reel slower with crank to get timelapse and overcranked the film faster than normal to get slowmotion, you're doing the same thing but with more control and digital percision)

 

You're mistaken.  sony cameras are shooting 25p (25 individual frames per second), it just so happens that the sensor is gathering light for 1/5th of a second then closing, then gathering light for another 5th of a second, five times a second.  each 5 consecutive frames are the same.  if it was shooting just 5 frames per second, when I open the file in premiere i'd see 5p, but I instead see 25p meaning there are 25frames there.  there might not be 25 different frames, but I have 25 frames none the less.  Tell me one mirrored camera that can shoot continuously for 25mins at 5 frames a second with each frame exposed continuously without a gap.  it isnt physically possible to open and close a mirror that quickly, continuously for 25mins regularly.  even a 1dx or d4 will eat up its shutter count and mirror will be dead in 2 months.  with the a7s you can shoot these clips at 4k, speed up by 500% and you have a timelapse with a rather interesting motion blur created practically, and in small file sizes. 

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You're mistaken.  sony cameras are shooting 25p (25 individual frames per second), it just so happens that the sensor is gathering light for 1/5th of a second then closing, then gathering light for another 5th of a second, five times a second. 

Well, no I am not mistaken, "the sensor is gathering light for 1/5th of a second then closing, then gathering light for another 5th of a second, five times a second", so you're shooting at 5 frames per second.

Again it's a physical impossibility to shoot at a lower shutter speed than 1/framerate. 

 Tell me one mirrored camera that can shoot continuously for 25mins at 5 frames a second with each frame exposed continuously without a gap.

550D. 

Not with the mirror obviously.

With a mirror in stills mode you'll be able to shoot at frame rates lower than 1-2 fps (1/1,1/2s), but with a Sony or a Canon with ML you can shoot higher intermediate frame rates like 5/10/15fps with 1/5,1/10s shutters for example. 


This topic is merely about shooting at lower fps than 25p to create timelapse effect. 

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the fact remains that Sony allow the slowest shutter speed in video mode.  1/4 of a second.  the setting is there, in plain view.  if it was shooting at 5fps it wouldnt say 25p, it would say 5p.  what ever it's doing, its doing what i imagine the thread starter is trying to find out.  the rolling shutter is open longer than the frame duration.   I keep expecting Sony to prevent users going slower than the frame rate, but it keeps being left in to our benefit.  

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the fact remains that Sony allow the slowest shutter speed in video mode.  1/4 of a second.  the setting is there, in plain view.  if it was shooting at 5fps it wouldnt say 25p, it would say 5p.  what ever it's doing, its doing what i imagine the thread starter is trying to find out.  the rolling shutter is open longer than the frame duration.   I keep expecting Sony to prevent users going slower than the frame rate, but it keeps being left in to our benefit.  

It's shooting at 5 fps and interpreting as 25 fps to deliver at 25 fps as a convenience. If it delivered at 5 fps you'd have had to interpret it as 25 ftps manually in the editor, but the result would be the same. The point is that it's capturing at 5 fps, not 25 fps: it's impossible to capture any faster than 5 fps because by the time it's time to capture the next frame it'd still be capturing the first one.

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  1/4 of a second.  the setting is there, in plain view.  if it was shooting at 5fps it wouldnt say 25p, it would say 5p. 

No it's shooting at 5p. 

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