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Andrew Reid

Nikon V1 - shooting 4K 60fps raw for $200

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The 6.5mm lens covers the sensor or did you crop-in slightly? Impressive if it covers.

To be correct 6.7mm covers the nikon 1 sensor completely leaving no vignettting.

Nikon offers  lens nikkor vr 6.7-13 f/3.5-5.6 thats pretty wide.

     

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Looks like we might have to use DPX format or TIFF sequences.

 

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CinemaDNG

 

"CinemaDNG is different from the Adobe DNG (Digital Negative) format that is primarily used as a raw image format for still cameras. However, each CinemaDNG image is encoded using that DNG image format. The image stream can then be stored in one of two formats: either as video essence using frame-based wrapping in an MXF file, or as a sequence of DNG image files in a specified file directory. Each clip uses just one of these formats, but the set of clips in a movie may use both."

 

Yes, here is the reply from Blackmagic:

 

"We unfortunately don't have a set recommendation for converting NEF files to use in Resolve. In regards to DNG, Resolve won't take just standard DNG and is looking for proper cinemaDNG files, so I'm not sure what capabilities Adobe's converter might have in this regard. Not sure if it's an option for you, but you might look into converting to TIFF if this is possible from the NEF files."

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To be correct 6.7mm covers the nikon 1 sensor completely leaving no vignettting.

Nikon offers  lens nikkor vr 6.7-13 f/3.5-5.6 thats pretty wide.

     

 

Sensor coverage is not an issue of focal length, but of the image circle of a lens. There are 6.5mm lenses that cover 1" sensors, and there are 6.5mm lenses that don't. (Just like a 25mm lens for Micro Four Thirds won't cover a full frame sensor, although there are plenty of 24mm full frame lenses.)

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Yes, here is the reply from Blackmagic:

 

"We unfortunately don't have a set recommendation for converting NEF files to use in Resolve. In regards to DNG, Resolve won't take just standard DNG and is looking for proper cinemaDNG files, so I'm not sure what capabilities Adobe's converter might have in this regard. Not sure if it's an option for you, but you might look into converting to TIFF if this is possible from the NEF files."

 

Well looks like that is DNG out.

 

I'll look for a good app which can convert the raw NEF files to DPX.

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Got this from Blackmagic forum:

--------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Resolve only supports CinemaDNG files. 

Standard DNG files have multiresolution support, and if you put one of those in Resolve, it will usually see and report the lowest resolution. Resolve does not support those.
Dwaine Maggart
Blackmagic Design DaVinci Support

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I have found that if i batch convert the NEF files to a 16bit TIFF sequence using Nikon ViewNX2 then resolve imports that sequence into the Media Pool at full resolution, although obviously I am missing the full advantage of manipulating RAW.  That TIFF sequence does grade and render from resolve tho.

 

The interesting thing is that the DNG image files sequence was correctly seen and imported into resolve in every other way than resolution, so it graded and rendered fine, just that at 256x171/8bit, it was blurry and soft.  I've asked BM nicely if there might be a chance they could look at this as I read their post, that resolve should import a sequence of DNG files at the lowest res in the sequence. (see above) That would be 3872x2592 and that would be awesome.

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Can you convert to DNG using this: http://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/detail.jsp?ftpID=5486

 

 

then pull a sequence through After Effects to make Cinema DNG?

 

Just off the top of my head... I don't have this camera at the moment

Hello, this may work, someone else's downloadable burst NEF shots here from the V1 if you want to try this idea out:

http://vimeo.com/61774105#

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How do you think, ss there any way of replacing the buffer chip to get more space for raws, for 5 seconds for example...?

 

Very unlikely that this will be possible. Buffer memory would need to be increased from 512 MB (what it is likely now for 50*12 MB raw images) to 2048 MB. You would need to unsolder the buffer memory chip from its tiny mainboard (if that's physically possible at all), resolder a new chip onto it (if that's physically possible at all), and then cross your fingers that the camera won't crash because of firmware incompatibility, power consumption and heat development. These compact electronic devices are engineered with so tightly crammed-in components and minimals tolerances that I would be greatly surprised if someone could pull this off. 

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Here's a relative quick workflow for those of you who want to use the command line (MacOS):

  • Import NEF files into Capture One/LR4 or whatever RAW processor you use.
  • Correct/grade the first image and sync it with the rest of the images in the same clip.
  • Export all corrected files as 16-bit TIFF into the same directory.
  • Run this script inside that directory to copy every 30 images to its own directory:
    x=0
    y=0
    for i in *.tif; do
        test $((x % 30)) -eq 0 && y=$((y+1))
        mkdir -p $y
        mv $i $y
        x=$((x+1))
    done
  • Immediately after that, run this script to create the symlinks img01.tif - img30.tif so that FFMPEG can batch the files:
    for i in */; do
        cd $i
        x=1
        for i in *.tif; do
            ln -s "$i" img$(printf d $x).tif
            x=$(($x+1))
        done
        cd ..
    done
  • Finally, run FFMPEG to convert the TIFF files to ProRes 422 HQ video files:
    for i in */; do
        cd $i
        ffmpeg -y -r 24 -force_fps -i imgd.tif -c:v prores_kostya -profile:v 3 -qscale:v 9 -vendor ap10 -pix_fmt yuv422p10le -r 24 $i.mov
        cd ..
    done

I just ran this on 510 .tif files and got 17 .mov files in the end (30GB --> 3GB). No human interaction required!

 

http://vimeo.com/62529532

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Y'all are working entirely too hard at this.  Adobe created the CinemaDNG & the photography DNG specifications.  Use their tools.

 

  1. In Adobe After Effects, create a new composition.
  2. Import File.
  3. Select the first .NEF file, Import As:  Footage, check Camera Raw Sequence.
  4. Very Important to bring the hotness.  Use Camera RAW to initially grade your footage.
  5. There is this weird thing where the default Frame Rate is set to 30fps.  Right click sequence and interpret footage where you will change the frame rate to what you captured in camera at.

 

Ready to use Premiere Pro to create your edits.

 

  1. In Premiere Pro, under File, select Adobe Dynamic Link, select Import After Effects Composition, find your .aep file in the browser.
  2. It will list all the compositions in the right panel, choose your shots.
  3. Add to timeline and edit.

 

You have not compressed the files (converted to jpeg or tiff), you get to use Adobe Camera Raw (same as used in Lightroom) to edit your RAW sequences/files, any changes you make in After Effects will now be reflected in your Premiere Pro project through dynamic linking and you did not need to create proxies.  The best of all worlds.  

 

This works with .NEF files as well as .DNG CinemaDNG files.  With the original CinemaDNG files you keep the timecode generated by your Blackmagic Camera, Ikonoskop A-Cam dII, or Digital Bolex.

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Y'all are working entirely too hard at this.  Adobe created the CinemaDNG & the photography DNG specifications.  Use their tools.

 

  1. In Adobe After Effects, create a new compostion.
  2. Import File.
  3. Select the first .NEF file, Import As:  Footage, check Camera Raw Sequence.
  4. Very Important to bring the hotness.  Use Camera RAW to initially grade your footage.
  5. There is this weird thing where the default Frame Rate is set to 30fps.  Right click sequence and interpret footage where you will change the frame rate to what you captured in camera at.

 

Ready to use Premiere Pro to create your edits.

 

  1. In Premiere Pro, under File, select Adobe Dynamic Link, select Import After Effects Composition, find your .aep file in the browser.
  2. It will list all the compositions in the right panel, choose your shots.
  3. Add to timeline and edit.

 

You have not compressed the files (converted to jpeg or tiff), you get to use Adobe Camera Raw (same as used in Lightroom) to edit your RAW sequences/files, any changes you make in After Effects will now be reflected in your Premiere Pro project through dynamic linking and you did not need to create proxies.  The best of all worlds.  

 

This works with .NEF files as well as .DNG CinemaDNG files.  With the original CinemaDNG files you keep the timecode generated by your Blackmagic Camera, Ikonoskop A-Cam dII, or Digital Bolex.

Hello,

 

Your suggestion is a great one.  By far the best workflow suggested so far.

 

I was hoping to get the V1 raw burst mode output into Resolve, but at the moment it is a no go.   So your suggestion to use Adobe products seems the most sensible for today.

 

I don't have After Effects, but I wonder if it could be used as one member suggested to intake the 30 NEF files, and output a CinemaDNG clip that Resolve could work with?

 

If anyone gets this working, I would have to go purchase AE.

 

Tim

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Here's a relative quick workflow for those of you who want to use the command line (MacOS):

  • Import NEF files into Capture One/LR4 or whatever RAW processor you use.
  • Correct/grade the first image and sync it with the rest of the images in the same clip.
  • Export all corrected files as 16-bit TIFF into the same directory.
  • Run this script inside that directory to copy every 30 images to its own directory:
    x=0
    y=0
    for i in *.tif; do
        test $((x % 30)) -eq 0 && y=$((y+1))
        mkdir -p $y
        mv $i $y
        x=$((x+1))
    done
  • Immediately after that, run this script to create the symlinks img01.tif - img30.tif so that FFMPEG can batch the files:
    for i in */; do
        cd $i
        x=1
        for i in *.tif; do
            ln -s "$i" img$(printf d $x).tif
            x=$(($x+1))
        done
        cd ..
    done
  • Finally, run FFMPEG to convert the TIFF files to ProRes 422 HQ video files:
    for i in */; do
        cd $i
        ffmpeg -y -r 24 -force_fps -i imgd.tif -c:v prores_kostya -profile:v 3 -qscale:v 9 -vendor ap10 -pix_fmt yuv422p10le -r 24 $i.mov
        cd ..
    done

I just ran this on 510 .tif files and got 17 .mov files in the end (30GB --> 3GB). No human interaction required!

 

http://vimeo.com/62529532

Hello, I'm very impressed with your end result and if I had a mac platform, I would cope with running these scripts.

 

I'm still hoping to find a way to use the raw burst mode of the V1 in Resolve.

 

Andrew is going to see if he can find a tool to facilitate this and that will be awesome if it works out.

 

On my Windows platform, I have been able to use Nikon ViewNX2 to create TIFFs and Resolve imports that sequence fine at full resolution, however unlike you I don't have any quality footage to post yet, but the quality of your workflow looks great.  Thanks for sharing it.

 

Tim

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Please register your account at www.fil.io. It has 90 day trial period and currently has unlimited storage/bandwidth

Your download link will look like this one

http://fil.io/fl4tc/nikon_v1_raw_test_2432x1368.mp4 or you can have folder with files like here:
http://fil.io/FL5m3/Nikon%20V1%202.4K%20video%20by%20Javier%20Sobremazas


>I would be happy to share the ProRes file if someone offered me the server space.

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Sony Vegas Pro 12 can easily open the sequence, and even at previewing the sequence in Draft - Quarter mode the image still looks amazing.  At the current rate, I wouldn't worry about ''grading.''  The V1 already provides amazing images, depending on the experienced head who's exposing correctly with the right profile.   Surely in 32-bit mode the RAW sequence has more color depth control than in 8-bit mode, however with the amount of data already within the images you can ''grade'' just fine and still get amazing results.  I had problems in 32-bit mode in Vegas as it becomes a bit unstable during render or linking to Premiere CS6, but in 8-bit mode it's easy to render.  Unfortunately Vegas no longer supports DPX or still image sequence renders.  I don't know why they took that out.  Looking forward to solely work in AE and Twixtor with this.  So far these 1 sec edits are really unimpressive, or imo just too limiting.

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  • Run this script inside that directory to copy every 30 images to its own directory:

 

 

Thanks! And funny - we've been independently working on similar solutions. I wrote a Perl script that also works with uneven numbers of images in a burst sequence. It uses the exiv2 command line utility (which needs to be separately installed) to create timestamps with the actual time an image was shot, reads those timestamps and groups all tiffs into folders that are less than two seconds apart from each other in their timestamps. So this should be a more accurate sorting tool, and it works great for me in practice:

 


#!/usr/bin/perl

# files to process


# 1 - rename file according to EXIF timestamp, prefix hh:mm:ss-yy:mm:dd

opendir (DIR, '.') || die "working directory not found.n";
@files = readdir(DIR);
closedir(DIR);

foreach $file(@files) {
	if ($file =~ /.tif$/i) {
		$file_root = $file;
		$file_root =~ s/....[.]*$//;
		system ("/usr/local/bin/exiv2 -r %H%M%S-%Y%m%d-$file_root mv $file") #|| die ("exiv2 utility not installed.n");
		}
	}

# 2 - create folders for each contiguous image sequence, move files into them

opendir (DIR, '.') || die "working directory not found.n";
@files = readdir(DIR);
closedir(DIR);

foreach $file(@files) {

	if ($file =~ /.tif$/i) {
 		if (&checksum($file)-&checksum($previous_file) > 2) {
 			$dir_count++;
 			$dir_count_string = $dir_count;
 			if ($dir_count < 10) {$dir_count_string="0$dir_count_string"}
 			if ($dir_count < 100) {$dir_count_string="0$dir_count_string"}
 			if ($dir_count < 1000) {$dir_count_string="0$dir_count_string"}
 			$dir_name_string = $file;
 			$dir_name_string =~ s/-.*//;
 			$dir_name = $dir_count_string . '-' . $dir_name_string;
			print "new dir: $dir_namen";
 			system ("mkdir $dir_name");
 			}
 		# print "$file -> $dir_namen" ;
 		if ($file =~ /[0-9]/) {
 			system ("mv $file $dir_name/");
 			}
 		$previous_file = $file;
		}
	}



sub checksum{
	# compute total time in seconds from time stamp prefix in the
	# file name
	my $checksum=$_[0];
	$checksum =~ /^([0-9][0-9])([0-9][0-9])([0-9][0-9])-.*/;
	$checksum = ($1*360)+($2*60)+$3;
	return $checksum;
	}

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