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Is there any disadvantages of filming portrait style (vertical)


lenny87
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8 hours ago, Phil A said:

Did you even read what he asked?

To the op: yes, for your application perfectly fine. Just composite it into the 16:9 frame where you have your CGI or whatever you green screen for.

Thanx Phil,

my background is a CGI Cartoon world :-) The vertical filming will allow me more zoom possibility with the 3Dcamera in my software (Fusion 9)

Zupa-behind_tree.thumb.gif.653d1b5ee59426f5fe61239980381baf.gif

7 hours ago, Nikkor said:

Rolling shutter will be vertical.

He Nikkor,

i always film on a tripod which is not moving at all. Will Rolling shutter affect my shots then?

46 minutes ago, EthanAlexander said:

I think half of the people responding (or more) aren't reading the post and just reacting to the title. You're intending to place the keyed footage on a landscape final product, right? If you're shooting a stationary person, portrait would give you more resolution for greenscreen work. I haven't done it personally, but I've seen plenty of BTS with vertical cameras for situations like this, maximizing the amount of the sensor you're using.

Thanx Ethan,

Yes i am shooting a stationary person and i will place the keyed footage on a 3D cartoon scene (like in the picture above)

You are so right,........ hahahahaha most people didn't read my post. But luckily there are quite a few people (like you) that did :-)

i am very happy with those reactions, cause it gives me the confidence that i won't run into any technical issues.

Thanx.

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11 hours ago, Phil A said:

Did you even read what he asked?

To the op: yes, for your application perfectly fine. Just composite it into the 16:9 frame where you have your CGI or whatever you green screen for.

Haha, you should try it. Seriously, go film some stuff, import it, see what happens. Enjoy.

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5 hours ago, Jonesy Jones said:

I filmed green screen all summer long last year vertically just like you're discussing. I shot him on a GH4 in 4K from head to toe and can punch in to nearly a CU in HD. So full body to CU.  it wouldn't work for every application but it did for us and it was really cool. 

Thanx,

Good to hear :-)

What focal length did you use? Or which would you recommend?

Thanx in front

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2 minutes ago, lenny87 said:

Thanx,

Good to hear :-)

What focal length did you use? Or which would you recommend?

Thanx in front

Good question. I think you'll want to test. I was using the 18-35 somewhere in the middle. My instinct says to go 35-50 if you have the space, also depends on the sensor of course. But definitely test. 

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The biggest problem I see is it's harder to match focal length to digital intuitively (should be fine if math is involved)
And then the perspective difference if you just crop in to the top half of the image vs center it in camera. So you need some nifty math to correct perspective for the reframe. Less of a problem with longer focal length tho. It also depends on your audience. If you use wide angle ppl would end up with long faces for example.

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16 hours ago, no_connection said:

The biggest problem I see is it's harder to match focal length to digital intuitively (should be fine if math is involved)
And then the perspective difference if you just crop in to the top half of the image vs center it in camera. So you need some nifty math to correct perspective for the reframe. Less of a problem with longer focal length tho. It also depends on your audience. If you use wide angle ppl would end up with long faces for example.

Thanx for the tip. I will go and make some test with my MFT 12mm lens and see if the face gets long as soon as i crop.

which Focal length would you recommend me?

 

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9 hours ago, lenny87 said:

Thanx for the tip. I will go and make some test with my MFT 12mm lens and see if the face gets long as soon as i crop.

which Focal length would you recommend me?

 

Focal length actually has nothing to do with "long faces:" it's the distance from the subject that affects perspective. The reason wide angle lenses are associated with unflattering faces is because people tend to get very close to the person to fill the frame of the shot. If you're trying to get head-to-toe coverage, you'll naturally have to back up from the subject, so your 12mm may work just fine...

Since you're getting more coverage by going vertical, I guess you might need a little tighter of a lens, though. Having never shot vertically it's hard to say. I bet a 17 or 21mm would work great.

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11 hours ago, lenny87 said:

which Focal length would you recommend

Since you're doing 2D type animation stuff, I'd recommend shooting long focal lengths.  This will "sit" better in the eventual composition.

I made a green screen project a few years back wherein we tried the short lens look.  Didn't like it at all and threw out all those shots.  Edge distortion was awkward.

And, FWIW, we shot vertical too.

On 8/14/2017 at 9:58 PM, lenny87 said:

 

Zupa-behind_tree.thumb.gif.653d1b5ee59426f5fe61239980381baf.gif

 

Also, an art direction thing to consider: Your subject is darker than the background.   As a rule of thumb, to make the image easier to look at, reverse that.  Not that you need to always do this, just a consideration.  Working in the virtual realm like you're doing gives you complete control over your "lighting."  Make sure you exploit it.

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On ‎8‎/‎14‎/‎2017 at 4:41 AM, Phil A said:

Did you even read what he asked?

To the op: yes, for your application perfectly fine. Just composite it into the 16:9 frame where you have your CGI or whatever you green screen for.

Don't think he did. 

For what the OP intended, shooting vertically is fine.

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14 hours ago, fuzzynormal said:

Since you're doing 2D type animation stuff, I'd recommend shooting long focal lengths.  This will "sit" better in the eventual composition.

I made a green screen project a few years back wherein we tried the short lens look.  Didn't like it at all and threw out all those shots.  Edge distortion was awkward.

And, FWIW, we shot vertical too.

Also, an art direction thing to consider: Your subject is darker than the background.   As a rule of thumb, to make the image easier to look at, reverse that.  Not that you need to always do this, just a consideration.  Working in the virtual realm like you're doing gives you complete control over your "lighting."  Make sure you exploit it.

Thanx for the great tips. Unfortunately i am not able to go for long focal lengths, due to the size of my room. It's only 50m2

 

Quote

Also, an art direction thing to consider: Your subject is darker than the background.   As a rule of thumb, to make the image easier to look at, reverse that.

Thanx, that's a valuable lesson to me :-)

Quote

 Working in the virtual realm like you're doing gives you complete control over your "lighting."  Make sure you exploit it.

How do you mean this exactly? Some people advice me to film flat and do the shadows and highlight in post. And others advice me to do the lighting in the film room.

I am quite confused about this and i don't know which would be best?

Thanx in front

greetz Lenny

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Thing is, you want to light your subject like it was in the real environment, or in the case of a "flat" world, stylize it to taste.

There is no fixing that in post if the light comes from the wrong direction.

If they meant filming with a flat profile to get highest dynamic range than that is a bad idea in this case. As you already have complete control over lighting you can make it "flat" that way if camera struggle.

I would suggest you set up a quick greenscreen in OBS or similar to have a realtime preview when playing around with lights to get the right feel and "pop" compared to background. Or even set up a script that does it for photos so you can do it somewhat realtime.

If you can't get good light for the subject, then any advantage in resolution or quality goes out the window.
 

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17 hours ago, no_connection said:

Thing is, you want to light your subject like it was in the real environment, or in the case of a "flat" world, stylize it to taste.

There is no fixing that in post if the light comes from the wrong direction.

If they meant filming with a flat profile to get highest dynamic range than that is a bad idea in this case. As you already have complete control over lighting you can make it "flat" that way if camera struggle.

I would suggest you set up a quick greenscreen in OBS or similar to have a realtime preview when playing around with lights to get the right feel and "pop" compared to background. Or even set up a script that does it for photos so you can do it somewhat realtime.

If you can't get good light for the subject, then any advantage in resolution or quality goes out the window.
 

Thanx,

What does OBS means?

 

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https://obsproject.com/

It is used by streamers of all kinds, pretty much the go-to application to stream stuff to the web. Which is why is has a lot of tutorials and help online. If you type OBS and greenscreen into youtube you will find tutorials for days. Do note that probably most of them are streamers, not ppl the know what they are doing, but can still show you how to set up the program.

There are other applications too out there, if you look around.

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On 8/17/2017 at 9:33 AM, lenny87 said:

How do you mean this exactly? Some people advice me to film flat and do the shadows and highlight in post. And others advice me to do the lighting in the film room.

Understanding lighting and the shape/texture of light is an acquired skill.  That's pretty much the simple answer, but a comprehension of what that particularly means takes study.  

I had a few semesters of art school that got me going years ago.  I was a terrible artist, but it set me thinking about light.  Getting a handle on what light is, how we perceive it, and what it does for your motion picture image is one of the things that separates legitimate filmmakers from others.

I wish I could summarize what "good lighting" means, but it's so contextual and subjective...you just got to learn it on your own.

FWIW, I'd do the light on set with direct consideration of what your background plate(s) looks like.  Adding effective shadow and highlights on a moving subject is a PITA.

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