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milandirector

entry level dslr or mirrorless camera for video

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Hi guys,

I used to follow EOSHD religiously, however in past year I had a lot of work and did not have any time to follow up on what's happening with new DSLR and mirrorless  market.

My girlfriend is just starting up with photography and videography and I want to get her for Black friday an entry level DSLR or mirrorless camera. Something on the cheaper side, but with decent video capabilities. I have no idea what's bang for back camera out there. I saw Sony has some interesting stuff, There are new Nikons and Canons, but I don't know which ones are decent for video. Something like GH4 is out of my price range for now. This would be a start up camera, until she gets her feet wet with photography and videography.

If anybody can give me their opinion on what to go for please do I would appreciate.

 

Thanks a lot!!!

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EOSHD Pro Color for Sony cameras EOSHD Pro LOG for Sony CamerasEOSHD C-LOG and Film Profiles for All Canon DSLRs

Yea the G7 bundle at B&H/Adorama is a really great deal (especially with adding the Panny 25mm f1.7 for just $50 more) and definitely the best bang for the buck for video right now. Plus it's a great backup cam to have on reserve for borrowing for your shooting (or even as a A cam depending on what you shoot with)!

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Also consider NX500. IMO it produces great 4K video that's pretty close to that of NX1. I just did a two-camera shoot with it and the two videos were virtually indistinguishable with a few tweaks. It's currently on a big Black Friday sale from Samsung off $300 from $799.99 to $499.99.

One aspect with NX500 you need to know is that it shoots in crop mode that makes wide shots a bit hard, but it can be huge advantage when shooting tight because you get free ultra zoom. I made multiple posts on this (e.g., see NX500 as teleconverter), search these forums and you'll find these and a lot of other posts on the camera.

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Guest Ebrahim Saadawi

You have to determine first whether she wants a camera to fit in her purse to take photos and videos of trips/friends, or wants a sizeable camera to get serious and learn throuoghout the line of lenses and lighting and so on. 

If size is "the priority" then you have the a6000. a great small mirrorless camera with a good evf, great stills and good 1080p with a large sensor. 

If size is not a priority and she wants something more sizeable, then the best camera will depend on what she shoots. 

Shoots landscapes, houses, nature, birds, wildlife, wide cities, then having 4K is the way to go. Get her the Panasonic G7. Lovely camera for those types of shooting, really shines and detail pops off the screen 

Shoots people? skin? weddings? lowlight? arty shallow depth of field blurry background "films"? then she needs a camera with a large sensor, great skin colours, and best lowlight performance, then the Nikon DSLRs are your best option (D5300/D5500). The 1080p video quality and stills performance is the highest in class, only exceeded by one factor on the G7 which is pure resolution/sharpness in video mode. This camera also has the most lens options and cheapest awesome glass line-up to choose from. 

Stay away from Canon DSLRs under 2000$ as they produce much worse image quality than the Nikons/panasonics now. A weird turnaround I know since you haven't looked in a couple of years when Canon was the way to go. It's not anymore (moire and aliasing)

 

I officially recommend the Nikon D5300/5500

From the three as the best hybrid for her to start diving into pro photography and videography on a budget without needing to fiddle to much with lens adapters, speedboosters, more lighting, harder colour grading, vintage/manual lenses, etc. 

If a much more experiences user used the G7 and D5500 side by side the G7 is going to serve him better and give him higher end result in resolution as he'd be able to workaround the smaller sensor crop with a speedbooster, workaround the inferior lowlight by adding more lighting gear, workaround the trickier colours by skillful grading, and end up with the benefit of 4K. We're a bit of video nerds so we recommend doing that. 

 

But for a balanced camera that can do everything and expand with the Nikon current SLRs are the best balance. 

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Stay away from Canon DSLRs under 2000$ as they produce much worse image quality than the Nikons/panasonics now. A weird turnaround I know since you haven't looked in a couple of years when Canon was the way to go. It's not anymore (moire and aliasing)

The T6i has the same IQ as the 7DII, which is a solid 1080p camera. The stills aren't as good, but it has the advantage of fast, silent DPAF in video. Most beginners are better off with a convenient camera with good results than an inconvenient one with great results. Plus you save $50 to buy her a bag, battery, and/or SD card.

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If size is a priority, then you should go for one for one of the Sony RX100 series. Sony RX10  mk1 / mk2 or Panasonic FZ1000 is also worthwhile checking out, good for the newbie shooter just starting out. 

Otherwise Sony A5100 / A6000 or Panasonic G6 / G7 or Nikon D5200, or all good to check out. 

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Guest Ebrahim Saadawi

The T6i has the same IQ as the 7DII, which is a solid 1080p camera. The stills aren't as good, but it has the advantage of fast, silent DPAF in video. Most beginners are better off with a convenient camera with good results than an inconvenient one with great results. Plus you save $50 to buy her a bag, battery, and/or SD card.

I was going to buy the t6s as it's the best camera body I've every held and used, what an utter joy of ergonomics and user interface. Not as big as the 60D, not as small as the 600D, So I compared it to my 60D (the previous generation Canon image) and my D5300. I also tested the 7D II for a 3 day shoot before.

1- The 7DII has an absolutely identical video image to the 5D MKIII. Even lowlight performance! It's a better image than the current Nikons for the high moire/aliasing resistance and better lowlight performance, and of course the magical autofocus. 

2- T6s/t6i have a new different video image.  It's better than the 60D generation, much better.

-It's sharper resolution (similar to D5300 and a6000, i.e, great 1080p)

-Isn't as moire resistant as the 7DII and D5300. It does color moire on bricks and so on. Less than 60D but isn't eliminated.

-Picture Style Sharpness set to zero is equivalent to +1 on the previous models and 7DII. There's always a digital sharpening look applied, while the 7DII/D5300 are smooth and can be set to no sharpening. This is something that really annoyed me when looking at the images on monitor, there's a +1 sharpening, I know how Canon +1 looks and it's there. 

 

Overall, while an improvement and good 1080p, the Nikons offer less aliased image and has that fine detail unsharpened look. These are the two reasons I don't recommend the Canon over the Nikons, they are slightly worse video image. But I much prefer the body and UI and the t6s is 10 generations ahead of then D5300 is ergonomics and body and UI ease of use, and a usable autofocua system in video mode and top LCD, two dials and ability to change iris in live view and dedicated video mode for 16:9 framing, just better than the fiddly nikons. But the D5300/5500 are great, you get used to the body. 

I agree for a beginner without strict aliasing-allergy as we do, the Canon rebels are a better choice for learning, for the reasons above and for the cheap lens line-up. Especially being able to buy a high performance ultra wide angle with IS for 250$ (10-18mm STM IS), buy a super sharp 50mm f1.8 with AF for 100$ and so on. 

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I was going to buy the t6s as it's the best camera body I've every held and used, what an utter joy of ergonomics and user interface. Not as big as the 60D, not as small as the 600D, So I compared it to my 60D (the previous generation Canon image) and my D5300. I also tested the 7D II for a 3 day shoot before.

1- The 7DII has an absolutely identical video image to the 5D MKIII. Even lowlight performance! It's a better image than the current Nikons for the high moire/aliasing resistance and better lowlight performance, and of course the magical autofocus. 

2- T6s/t6i have a new different video image.  It's better than the 60D generation, much better.

-It's sharper resolution (similar to D5300 and a6000, i.e, great 1080p)

-Isn't as moire resistant as the 7DII and D5300. It does color moire on bricks and so on. Less than 60D but isn't eliminated.

-Picture Style Sharpness set to zero is equivalent to +1 on the previous models and 7DII. There's always a digital sharpening look applied, while the 7DII/D5300 are smooth and can be set to no sharpening. This is something that really annoyed me when looking at the images on monitor, there's a +1 sharpening, I know how Canon +1 looks and it's there. 

 

Overall, while an improvement and good 1080p, the Nikons offer less aliased image and has that fine detail unsharpened look. These are the two reasons I don't recommend the Canon over the Nikons, they are slightly worse video image. But I much prefer the body and UI and the t6s is 10 generations ahead of then D5300 is ergonomics and body and UI ease of use, and a usable autofocua system in video mode and top LCD, two dials and ability to change iris in live view and dedicated video mode for 16:9 framing, just better than the fiddly nikons. But the D5300/5500 are great, you get used to the body. 

I agree for a beginner without strict aliasing-allergy as we do, the Canon rebels are a better choice for learning, for the reasons above and for the cheap lens line-up. Especially being able to buy a high performance ultra wide angle with IS for 250$ (10-18mm STM IS), buy a super sharp 50mm f1.8 with AF for 100$ and so on. 

My recommendation is colored by working at Best Buy, where most consumers have no idea what they're doing. For that clientele--soccer moms, new parents, event shooters, film students--fast, silent video AF and flawless ergonomics take precedence over that bit of aliasing. Plus, Canon's reputation for DSLR video is taking a long time to die, they still have the most third-party support, and EF mount is much more flexible. 

All in all, both solid choices. Nikon wins on quality, Canon on convenience.

Question though--you really think the 7D II has an identical image to the 5DIII? From the samples I've seen, the resolution and compression seem improved. How does the T6i image compare in those regards? It's hard to tell after web compression, and I've only seen the footage on a 3" back screen.

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