Jump to content

Adobe drops Dolby audio support from Premiere CC 2018, forces Windows 10 upgrade


Andrew Reid
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Administrators

Adobe have decided to save a few bucks and get rid of their built in Dolby audio codec, so that the latest, worst, I mean greatest Premiere relies on the god-damn OS for critical things like the sound track on your AVCHD clips.

https://forums.adobe.com/thread/2396890

Adobe are presumably being run into the ground by complacent bean counters who think a monopoly and a successful subscription model is somehow what we voted for.

Vote with your feet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any power users want to convince me Resolve has got the strength to edit documentaries and handle all that media? I'm interested. 

I kinda gave up on FCP a few years ago, but can be swayed back there...

JUST REMEMBER: feature length documentary. 

Anyone playing that game too?  Curious to hear the feedback. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, fuzzynormal said:

I kinda gave up on FCP a few years ago, but can be swayed back there...

At work I switch between Premiere and FCPX... When working on jobs for my own clients: FCPX. I like it a lot and it's come such a long way in the past few years. 

3 hours ago, Jonesy Jones said:

For me After Effects is just as critical as having an editor. I know BM has Fusion, but it's just not there. I also use Photoshop frequently, but I'm sure that could be replaced with something else.

That's the real rub: as long as they dominate with After Effects and Photoshop, there's no way to truly leave Adobe. I couldn't do my job without those two programs. And, for me at least, even if there were programs that could match I wouldn't want to lose the decade of experience I have with each.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, fuzzynormal said:

I kinda gave up on FCP a few years ago, but can be swayed back there...

 

FCPX would actually be alright to edit a doco on. That said, it takes some getting used to. I've been switching between it and Media Composer because Media Composer struggles with XAVC for some bizarre reason, and you can get an edit together pretty quick on FCPX. You just need to rethink the way you're used to working. 

9 hours ago, EthanAlexander said:

as long as they dominate with After Effects and Photoshop,

You can still quite easily use both of these with a non-Adobe editor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, fuzzynormal said:

How so?

FCPX is based on a "trackless magnetic timeline" which is night-and-day different from adobe. You can "trick" it into behaving more like a normal timeline, which I did for a while (by building my timeline above a blank clip on the magnetic part) but once I fully embraced it my editing speed has dramatically increased. One thing I don't like about it is audio editing, which is very hard to batch.

If you want to explore FCPX, adding RGB House's "Total Adjustment" adjustment layer and Alex4D's "sound only" crossfade is essential. Why these aren't already a part of the software is mind-boggling.

http://rgbhouse.com/?p=74

https://blog.alex4d.com/2011/07/11/fcpx-transition-sound-only/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, fuzzynormal said:

How so?

Magnetic timeline and arbitrary tracks are just an entirely different way of working. Getting used to FCPX's idea of what a 'storyline' is. 

Given how powerful FCPX is and its ability to do tasks in the background, I find it's very quick to get an assembly together. The iMovie style scrubbing of source clips makes it very easy to quickly look at what you have and grab what you need. 

Being able to work with your footage while it's still transcoding, or exporting a master file whilst you move onto another edit, or start your cutdown options is incredibly efficient.

I find fine-cutting and doing fine adjustments after your assembly more difficult. That said, the newest version does a lot to help this. You just need to get your head around the way the timeline works.

The magnetic timeline quirks are what make it very different to others. Having clips 'attach' to others so that if you delete one, it might delete 5 others that are attached to it. Extending a piece of audio or video and have it push everything else back instead of sliding underneath. 

But they sound worse than they are - at least once you're used to it (the first few times it happens you'll curse a bit). I actually think FCPX is a great option for long form documentary, better than Premiere in some/many respects. 

But do a smaller project on it first to get your head around it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, jax_rox said:

scrubbing of source clips makes it very easy to quickly look at what you have and grab what you need. 

Being able to work with your footage while it's still transcoding, or exporting a master file whilst you move onto another edit, or start your cutdown options is incredibly efficient.

Nice features, but also what Premiere does. 

Still, at least with FCP it's not a subscription. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...