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Don Kotlos

A7sIII - Get ready?

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Any chance the a7S III will sport:

 

  • improved color rendition/palette 
  • 10 bit internal

 

Sidenote:  How large could one print photos taken on the a7s II 12mp camera?  Is the a7rII that much better for printing large images?  Such as huge posters for wall artwork in an apartment?  48" 52" image max?

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EOSHD Pro Color for Sony cameras EOSHD Pro LOG for Sony Cameras
18 minutes ago, jasonmillard81 said:

Any chance the a7S III will sport:

 

  • improved color rendition/palette 
  • 10 bit internal

 

Sidenote:  How large could one print photos taken on the a7s II 12mp camera?  Is the a7rII that much better for printing large images?  Such as huge posters for wall artwork in an apartment?  48" 52" image max?

Colour will likely be an incremental improvement on A7S III, just like A7S II from A7S. 10bit internal not going to happen.

Max printing size depends on viewing distance.

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2 hours ago, Luke Mason said:

Two articles you linked are from more than a decade ago. They are not so relevant to what most of the sensors are doing today.

You (and the articles) are still talking about colour aware pixel-binning which improves SNR and creates full RGB data without interpolation. This is currently only used on C300/C500 (Sony F35 was a legend with this binning technique). The pixel-binning method used by majority of cameras today couldn't be more simple, they treat multiple pixels as one, one readout for many pixels, there's no averaging or any other processing involving signals from individual pixels. Because of the high total FWC of the pixel group, readout noise increases. Also if the OLPF is not designed with the size of the pixel group in mind, there will be severe aliasing.

It's true that there are multiple ways to implement this: http://harvestimaging.com/blog/?p=1560. Do you have have a link showing how modern consumer CMOS sensors implement your description, where the binning implementation results in no noise reduction? Lots of papers showing noise reduction from binning (Kodak and Phase One): http://asp.eurasipjournals.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/1687-6180-2012-125http://www.quantumimaging.com/binning/

The original C300 just takes R and B as is from the Bayer array, where two copies of G are averaged together for a low-pass filter- no traditional de-Bayering takes place.

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9 hours ago, Luke Mason said:

If the OLPF is not designed with the size of the pixel group in mind, there will be severe aliasing.

Yes, and thats why it needs different algorithms. in your sample, binned version isnt soft. There is really 2k worth of details in the data, its just imprecisely rendered. but Sony is not much interested in spending R&D money on this software puzzle while they are capable of delivering ever faster hardware, though with heat issues. Here is the thing: 30-40mp still is the lowest resolution people are going to demand, and they want 60fps 4k in the same device, which should remain light and compact. With your preferred full-sensor-readout-and-downsamplig method, a lot a lot of data should travel through system and be processed that will generate extra heat, consume extra power, and affect overall reliability. 

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9 hours ago, jasonmillard81 said:

Any chance the a7S III will sport:

 

  • improved color rendition/palette 
  • 10 bit internal

 

Sidenote:  How large could one print photos taken on the a7s II 12mp camera?  Is the a7rII that much better for printing large images?  Such as huge posters for wall artwork in an apartment?  48" 52" image max?

And what about cropping? If you never need to crop, 12mp could be enough.

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