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4k Editing MacBook Pro Help

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Hi,

I am looking to upgrade my ageing MacBook Pro and have come across the following:

Mid 2014 MacBook Pro Retina 13 i7 3.0 Dual Core, 16GB Ram, 512GB SSD and Intel HD 5100 GFX.

It should handle D750 1080p footage with ease? Will this one cope well with any 4K Final Cut Pro X editing from GH4 or G7 footage in the future? 

Thanks.

Red

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EOSHD Pro Color for Sony cameras EOSHD Pro LOG for Sony CamerasEOSHD C-LOG and Film Profiles for All Canon DSLRs

Probably best to find a version with a decent dedicated graphics card, otherwise I assume everything else is in order. Don't be tempted to get a cheaper or more powerful Windows laptop- it really sucks going back.

You can check graphics cards easily here: http://www.notebookcheck.net/Computer-Games-on-Laptop-Graphics-Cards.13849.0.html

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I am not looking to get a Windows laptop. I am solely looking at upgrading my MacBook Pro of 6 years with something more powerful to handle Final Cut Pro X better.

I am not a gamer so confused by the link?

I am just looking to see what MacBook Pro 13 or maybe 15 can handle GH4 or G7 footage with ease as told it is CPU dependent for the crunching? I am looking into the second hand market hence saw the i7 Mid 2014 MBPr 13.

Any one using a machine of similar nature?

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I mention the graphics card because I was told to get a decent one with at least 2GB RAM for video editing. I had a similar Intel graphics card (1.5 GB) in my old Macbook and it couldn't handle 4K from a GH4 (but the rest of my specs were lower so that might not be the only/main factor). I am not an expert in this stuff but the graphics card certainly helps with some aspect of editing. I mentioned Windows because I found the current Macbooks barely had good enough cards/specs, so I cheaped out and went with a Windows laptop which has been a pain getting used to (but it breezes through GH4 4K). Hopefully someone has the machine you mention and can give you a more accurate assessment. 

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I have a late 2014 MacBook Air SSD i5 with 8gb Ram and I have no problem editing 4K prores LT on FCPX. But I usually convert my 4K footage to 1080p prores before I bring it into FCPX.  Also, ICYW, I just updated to El Capitan and haven't had a problem with it at all, in fact, the update has actually fixed a couple issues I was having with the computer. 

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Thanks mercer for your input. How come you convert 4K footage to 1080p prores? Do you simply downscale it and edit for 1080p output? Do you not lose the crop ability of 4k? Be interested to hear more about your workflow.

Have you done any straight 4k into FCPX?

As for the specification of the laptop I found it seems plausible to think it will edit the footage fine?

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No problem. I shoot with the NX500, so the native files are h.265. I have to convert it anyway, and I have just always been a fan of 4K converted to 1080p, I think it has a weightier image than straight 4K, which I find can sometimes look brittle. Also, the h.265 files are so compressed that they are pretty big when I convert them to prores, by turning it to 1080, I save some file space. The NX500 already has a 2.5x crop, so I have no interest in any further crop. Plus, my goal is narrative filmmaking, so I try and plan my shots. Of course, if I do need a crop, I guess, I can just bring in the 4K version.

I use EditReady to convert my files to prores and then I import them into FCPX for correction grade and edit. I use the Color Finale plug in for LUTS and any color work... of course, I am a newbie with a lot of this.

I have edited straight 4K and didn't have a problem at all, so with the specs for the MacBook Pro you posted, everything should work fine. Definitely with the D750, probably with the 4K from a gh4. I've never edited native 4K mov/MP4 files, but I can't imagine it would be a problem.

How do you like the D750? I never shot with a Nikon, but I have really liked what I have seen from the D5500, so I may pick one up if they go on sale at Christmas. 

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Thanks again for the reply. EditReady seems like a handy app. I have never converted my footage into prores and normally just drop the mov files into FCPX. I shall explore prores to see if it can aid my final output.

I do like the 15" MacBook Pro but the 13" form factor seems appealing for when not doing edits and away from the monitor and wanting to be more mobile.

I really enjoy shooting with the D750. The footage it creates is very good and doesn't need much post. I shot previously with the D800 and then upgraded. The Nikon image I found is a lot better than anything a Canon DSLR can produce when comparing footage. It doesn't have all the features Sony or Panasonic tout for video but the image for shooting skin tones can't be matched. I am looking for a second body. I wanted the D5500 but likely to get the D7200 or anything new Nikon release in 2016. I use Nikon glass and also use it for stills so find it meets my needs.

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Yeah, the flat profile looks great. I used to shoot with a t2i and eos-m and I miss the ease of the post work, but their image just isn't good enough anymore. I have recently been messing around with ML Raw on my eos-m. With the 3x crop, I can use a set of vintage c-mounts I had bought when I thought I was going to get the BMPCC. So, that's been kinda fun, but too tedious for any real work.

I'm interested in the Nikon for a web series I want to shoot next year and thought the quick turnaround would be a better fit than the 4K. Plus there is just something so filmic about that Nikon image. And, last but not least, I have a small set of Nikkor lenses that I'm excited to use natively. I only have vintage lenses, so it might be nice not to have to worry about adapters.

Do you know the main video differences between the D7200 and D5500... To save me a tiring Google search...

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The D7200 allows you to change the aperture in live view mode, has 2 dials for aperture and shutter, can dial in the kelvin value, has a motor for auto focus on older lenses if doings still or quick focus before record, more robust body to name but a few....

Have a read of this blog for more info about Nikon and Cinema.

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Thanks for the link. The D7200 does seem like a nice upgrade to the D5500, but for the extra money, for my needs, the D5500 would probably do. How is the audio with the Nikons? I would love to be able to plug in a shotgun mic and get usable sound. 

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I've been using a 2011 15 inch Macbook Pro for the last 4 years, and my financial situation doesn't really give me the option of buying new computer right now, but I was just wondering would it be worth throwing a $200-$300 into replacing the hard drive with a new SSD and maxing out my RAM? Or would the limitation of processor (2.2 GHz Intel Core i7) and graphics card (Intel HD Graphics 3000 512 MB) negate the benefits of the upgrade? 

Would it just be better if I saved my money put it towards my eventually buying a desktop? 

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On 20. November 2015 at 4:45 PM, red said:

Any one using a machine of similar nature?

I still have a 2009 MP (now the 27" iMac). My advice is to buy a TB external drive and try the (very simple) proxy workflow. Just in case you encounter any drawbacks with native 4k.

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13 hours ago, John_Harrison said:

I've been using a 2011 15 inch Macbook Pro for the last 4 years, and my financial situation doesn't really give me the option of buying new computer right now, but I was just wondering would it be worth throwing a $200-$300 into replacing the hard drive with a new SSD and maxing out my RAM? Or would the limitation of processor (2.2 GHz Intel Core i7) and graphics card (Intel HD Graphics 3000 512 MB) negate the benefits of the upgrade? 

Would it just be better if I saved my money put it towards my eventually buying a desktop? 

Go ahead and install an SSD - you will think you've got a new laptop, your read and write speeds will increase dramatically. How much RAM do you have now? Definitely go for at least 8GB or the most the laptop can handle.

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I currently have 8GB installed, and I've found my computer to be pretty sluggish most of the time and unbearably slow at other times. I was thinking of throwing 16GB in there and seeing what happens. 

Is the performance boost really that much though? Wouldn't the processor and graphics card hold it back? 

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For the 2011 grab 16GB via Crucial and then replace the HDD with a SSD and also replace the optical drive with another SSD or even a larger HDD or the existing HDD. Put OSX on the SSD and all your data on the HDD. This should speed up your machine considerably.  

Check this guide to get dual HDD in your machine.

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