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Andrew Reid

Canon 7D raw video with the Mosaic Engineering anti-aliasing filter

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Maybe I need to move!

 

It is not A-OK in the U.S.  My brother and sister were walking down the street to meet us.  I started shooting them with my EOS-M RAW setup.  Another couple were walking in front of them and when they passed the guy said something nasty to me.  

 

You know what I do Andrew?  I think about a few hundred ways of beating him up, telling him he's a philistine, saying things like "Every corporation and government agency photos you a million times during the course of a day and you're upset with my photo?!"  I get REALLY upset.  It RUINS MY DAY.  I think of packing all my cameras away, that's how sensitive I am to it.

 

Maybe I'd be better off blaming them or the laws.   Do you think that is the best way to think about it?  

 

One of my favorite story lines in movies is the Lyle Lovett character in "Short Cuts"  He plays a baker.  A husband and wife come in and order a cake.  He makes it.  They never show up.  He's so incensed with their rudeness he throws the cake on their porch, or something, only to find out they had lost their kid.  Something like that.

 

We never know where people are, in their lives, when we're shooting them.  Maybe those kids were kicked out of school.  Or just spent a day getting yelled at by a boss in some dead-end, low pay job.  I like to believe people don't choose to be mean.  All this doesn't make getting the finger any less painful, at least for me.

 

It's a very interesting subject to me.  But the posts suggesting it's the subject's fault don't convince me.  Again 1.) Pointing is rude, I honestly don't like people pointing cameras at me either (about about you?); I just tolerate it better 2.) The person may be having a bad day 3.) The person may be starved for power, like the woman you shot, and you've started the "relationship" and 4) Some people actually think they're doing you a favor by acting out.  Believe it or not, those boys may have thought they were helping you!

 

I hope you don't move to the U.S. because I really enjoy the stuff you shoot in Europe.  I get the pleasure without the plane ride!

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Look up the definition of public. Public is the opposite of private. A public space is by definition NOT a private space. Yet Germany tries to pass a law that makes it like a private one. Then maybe you can see why I have a problem with the logic of it.

 

What do you do at a gig or concert with faces in the crowd? Is the crowd allowed to sue the videographer shooting back at them from the stage?

 

Nutty or what?

 

Public spaces are spaces freely accessible by anyone. Nothing within that description dictates that you'll have to allow people to record you without your consent.

 

Germany doesn't try, they've passed that law long ago, and it fits in perfectly well with their society. In Germany, you do not abandon your right to privacy when you're out in the public. If you've got a problem with that, then that's  your problem. There's no reason why recording others without permission in public would *have* to be allowed, it's something that can just as easily not be allowed. Hence it varies from country to country, based upon what the populus wants.

 

There's no reason why a concert or the like couldn't have a clause that says that when you attend this concert, eg. purchase a ticket etc, you agree to them recording you. That's the whole point of the Germanys law, that you as a individual have to give express permission for someone to record you under normal circumstances. Having to ask for permission before you record someone in public doesn't not meant that all recording is banned.

 

Something isn't nutty just because it's different from what you like or what you're used to.

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The technical reason why the German law is not correct is that it defies basic logic.

 

From such a logical bunch of people and such an intelligent culture, I am really surprised at some of their directives and government practices.

It doesn't defy logic, it only defies your preconceptions. You're used to that being in public means that you've got no right to privacy. But there's no reason why that *has* to be the case. In Germany, it isn't, and that makes exactly as much sense as to opposite. There simply is no reason why recoding someone without asking permission first has to be allowed. The law would only defy logic if the Germans would be OK with losing their assumption of privacy in public, but as we both know, the opposite is true.

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Troll much?

 

Nope, I'm being dead serious. Me and Andrew are both are both immigrants in Germany, so I do understand where he's coming from. But if you're choosing where to live, why chose a place where you don't agree with the values of the people there? It's the same reason why I wouldn't chose to live in a country that without equal rights between genders.

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Most of the German friends I have mentioned this too actually think it's ridiculous as well that you can't be free as an artist to shoot in public spaces without the risk of someone making trouble later through the legal system. It is not the society most German people want to live in actually, it is almost a police state kind of rule that is out of step with modern life.

 

I am very respectful with how and where I point my camera. I do not go round shoving it in unwilling peoples faces.

 

There is something else going on here beyond the privacy issue, as I outlined in the article, it is the hatred of tourists that is driving a general bad atmosphere in Germany with regards to DSLR shooters on the streets.

 

I'm going to give Berlin a break this summer and explore new territory. I will go back to Taiwan and Japan to continue my earlier work there as they are beautiful parts of the world and very friendly. I don't plan to stay in Berlin for the rest of my life. I have enjoyed my time here but maybe it is time to try something new.

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Did anybody think that it has nothing to do with the fact that you are shooting in a public space, but more with the fact that you are shooting the people themselves?

I live in Belgium, and what I usually do, is walk up to the people and ask if they mind if i shoot some test video etc... they usually don't mind. But if i start filming paparazzi style without their consent... I dunno, I guess that isn't really cool. I mean, if I go shopping or take a strol in the park, I also would mind if someone was constantly filming me without me knowing... Kinda creepy if I think about it.

Filming in a public space= fine
Filming people without them knowing in a public space= stalkerism = not cool

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Most of the German friends I have mentioned this too actually think it's ridiculous as well that you can't be free as an artist to shoot in public spaces without the risk of someone making trouble later through the legal system. It is not the society most German people want to live in actually, it is almost a police state kind of rule that is out of step with modern life.

 

I am very respectful with how and where I point my camera. I do not go round shoving it in unwilling peoples faces.

 

There is something else going on here beyond the privacy issue, as I outlined in the article, it is the hatred of tourists that is driving a general bad atmosphere in Germany with regards to DSLR shooters on the streets.

 

I'm going to give Berlin a break this summer and explore new territory. I will go back to Taiwan and Japan to continue my earlier work there as they are beautiful parts of the world and very friendly. I don't plan to stay in Berlin for the rest of my life. I have enjoyed my time here but maybe it is time to try something new.

 

That's a big claim. Most Germans I know value the law, because they feel that privacy is something that needs to be protected. And from what I've seen in the media, that's the prevailing opinion. There are strict laws set-up to protect privacy in all aspects of their lives, not just when they're out in the public.They shake their heads at the idea of something like London, where you can't walk two meters before a CCTV picks you up.

 

And unlike the British CCTVs, the German privacy laws has nothing to do with with the state controlling anything. It has only to do with protecting the born rights of the German people. They view personal privacy as a core right, and as such, you don't lose it just because you're out in the public. Your rights as an artist ends where the other persons rights to privacy begin, and that's true for every western country. The only difference is that in Germany, you've got the right to privacy in public. And like anything, there aren't any god-given right answers. When does freedom of speech become slander? When does fair-use become IP theft? When does candid art become an invasion of privacy?

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Hi,

 

Do you think there is a difference in the files quality between a prores hq 4:2:2 converted from raw files and a the same prores converted with atomos blade ?

 

I know wa can't do this due to the hdmi of the 5d but just an interoogation on other camera which can do this.

 

Thanks

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The whole concept of privacy in a public place is a rather odd one.  A right to privacy implies that other people don't have the right to know what you are doing unless you permit it.  If you are in a public place everybody can see what you are doing, therefore you have no privacy.

 

This has implications beyond just photography and videography if taken to it's logical conclusion. The mere knowledge of a person being in a particular place at a particular time could be taken as an invasion of privacy.

 

Perhaps Germans should look see this public information film for advice:

 

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The whole concept of privacy in a public place is a rather odd one.  A right to privacy implies that other people don't have the right to know what you are doing unless you permit it.  If you are in a public place everybody can see what you are doing, therefore you have no privacy.

 

This has implications beyond just photography and videography if taken to it's logical conclusion. The mere knowledge of a person being in a particular place at a particular time could be taken as an invasion of privacy.

 

Perhaps Germans should look see this public information film for advice:

 

'>

 

I agree 100%. Weird philosophy their law takes, from such an otherwise lovely country whose people have impeccable logic.

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