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Daylight 5000k-6000k best to light actors skin?


exomonkeyman
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Hey Guys!  This could be a quick and short answer to mainly cover one simple lighting question. A noob 101 question most likely.

I just watched Pain & Gain and I thought the colors were was just amazing. Intense orange & reddish skin. Really vibrant colors. Often using color contrast between blueish tones and greenish tones in the gym sequences to contrast against the skin.

So I checked some b-roll out to see if they used gels to light some scenes to aid the grade etc etc, To see no surprise.. little to no color in the scene other than I guess just daylight 5600K kino/florescent's/HMI's. Meaning that it seems like it could be all up to the colorist to actually add half of the movies actual color.

Shots from the movie on the LEFT and from the b-roll on the RIGHT

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So do all movies do this? Light scenes with 5000k to 6000k daylight white bulbs/fluorescence's? (I'm guessing) to therefore get the most accurate lighting on skin so only capturing the skin's actual tones and not just pushing a warm color onto it almost lying it's warm when it's not?

I just have a fear that when I go out and shoot a short film and i use daylight bulbs to light some scenes I fear that when I get in post i'll just end up with some visually boring looking mess that became too technically correct and lost any creative style.

 

TLDR: Is lighting normal scenes with 5000k to 6000k daylight the most accurate way to lighting skin to then grade later?

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1 hour ago, exomonkeyman said:

I just have a fear that when I go out and shoot a short film and i use daylight bulbs to light some scenes I fear that when I get in post i'll just end up with some visually boring looking mess that became too technically correct and lost any creative style.

That's the reason people make tests. First stick to rules, then go wild. First WB manually, then try going over/under. Nobody makes art with a preset.

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A lot of this is in the color grade. They'll push the mids and mid/lows to teal/blue. Then add a qualifier on the actors skin to bring up orange/warm saturation. Another good way to shoot this is to use Tungsten lighting and add one daylight practical source in the background to give a pop of color contrast.

1 hour ago, exomonkeyman said:

7uuty.PNG654647.PNG

Notice that the lighting on the right is overall warm. In the background is a daylight or blue practical. In post they push everything toward a cool blue/green except Mark Wahlberg's skin.

 

 

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