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Sony asks "is 4K worth it?" Their own research says...

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Posted · Report post

Real world wise, it doesnt really matter. Because every theater is different, there is no "one way" to have the proper experience at a theater. Heck it even differs room to room in a theater. I think we shouldnt be pushing 2k or 4k, we need to push theaters to calibrate their theaters correctly, its no point having 4K if you cant see anything...

Seriously, awhile back I watched The Raid and the projection was absolutely garbage. Just to be curious I snuck in to another showing, and it was significantly better. It turned into a luck of the draw to me now when ever I go see a flick, crossing my fingers and hoping I get a good room with good calibration....

Someone needs to make it the standard, similar to what Lucas did with THX.

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Posted · Report post

Calibrating projectors is not a new issue either... When we bought our old cinema/house where we live, I had a talk with the aging projectionist who used to run the theater (now unfortunately deceased)... he told me that for moody, romantic movies he used to change to older, less sharp projector lenses and defocus the mirror behind the arc light to get a little vignetting, just to set the mood... For crispness he would dig out the Möller lenses, get the light as bright and focused as possible ... but as he said "if we get a badly copied movie, nothing helps"... The quality was best in summer, when his wife would wash and bleach the cotton screen...
Axel likes this

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Posted · Report post

Because back then, cinema was all emotion and sensations, not about 'technical specs' ...
kirk likes this

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Posted · Report post

As the inventor of HTPO and a human factors professional by trade, it's really encouraging for me to see the work of our industry finally being recognised for its value in the real world.
Indeed, the article is really only part of the story. Intresting aspects that were only touched on or were not cited...[list]
[*]Note that 4K appears to have a greater impact on 4K ready TV than in theaters. There's an excellent reason for that. As we learned from the article, the wider the scan field of the visual system, the more 'work' it has to do to compile a mosaic of the whole scree,. The smaller (yet closer) the screen, the less work in building a mosaic and this tends to promote the perception of higher resolution
[*]Now that the 'cat is out of the bag' with reference to viewing distances and how that impacts the perception of resolution, will we see differentiation in ticket prices depending on distances from the screen? ;) We should !
[*]Andrew astutely notes that he still appreciates classic film, even with all it's technical on-screen degradation. This is a key point as it underscores the importance of everything else related to film making– besides the fundamental resolution. However, not all movies are epic narratives. Some movies are technical or commercial– and those movies benefit hugely from higher perceived resolutions.
[/list]

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