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Learning how to walk :)


JazzBox
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Ciao!

In these days I'm using monopod more and more, especially for medium shot and close up, thanks to the faster workflow compared to my trusty tripod 501HDV.

I sold my Flycam some weeks ago and, after reading that "Dallas Buyers Club" was shot mostly handheld, I am very motivated to become a good handheld shooter, because I loved the cinematography of the movie :)

Untill I stand still I have pretty good results shooting with a GorillaPod SRL Zoom (with ballhead) and with a little cheap shoulder rig.

But, as soon I start to walk following the talent I have shaky shots. 

Of course I use a wide angle lens stopped down, but the results are quite distracting...
I saw some great films (and videos) that show the talent walking perfectly  in focus, with a nice shallow DOF... so I'm pretty sure I need some hint to improve my technique :)

Could you help me? 
 

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But, as soon I start to walk following the talent I have shaky shots.

 

I have the same problem, I don't know how to walk, or it's caused by my equipment?

 

You can't walk as you do normally since your shoulders change their axial position as you do.

You ll have to bend your knees and keep you shoulders at the same level.

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For a lot of handheld I found one just has to "glide" as much as possible.  

 

I think this is easier for shorter people.  The squat walk.

 

The smoother you are, the smoother the shot is, is that's what you want.  You just kind of learn to hand-hold to the best of your ability.  Other things influence it a lot.  Rig, mass, etc.  Bigger cameras off-the-shoulder are actually better for handheld shots, IMHO.  Maybe that's my broadcasting background bias.  

 

But, for instance, I mounted a lead pipe with a bottom weight to a DSLR camera --and used that mass as a steadying device for a lot of walking sequences.  I wanted the shots to look like they were half way between hand-held and steady cam.

 

Again, just depends what you're going for.  The cinematography in a film like Dallas Buyers Club, or say Bourne Identity, is way more involved than just being handheld, obviously.  It's disciplined movement of the lens in relation to the light and character...even if it's deliberately visually chaotic.

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  I wanted the shots to look like they were half way between hand-held and steady cam.

Yes, it is exactly what I'd like to achieve! 
I tried using a 17 mm (on my Panasonic it is a 34mm), but my shots were super wobbly, today I'll try with a 12 mm, staying closer to the talent :)

But the problem it is also when I go out, shooting in an uneven terrain...   :wacko: 
 

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i am one of the biggest lovers of handheld and one of the worst shakiest camera women out there.

 

my advice 

1. gym, no way to do handheld if you have chicken wings for biceps

 

2.try to walk with your knees bended a bit  difficult but works (think of your knees as car suspensions keep them bended)

 

3.if you go completely handheld (no monopod) then control the shake by actually enhancing it in a rythm  up and down 

 

4.use the camera strap on your neck as balance and extend it with the camera 

 

5. use a pillow, crazy but works if you have nothing, just strap a pillow in your chest and rest your elbows on it.. (Chris Doyle dp )

 

6. in general use your elbows against your chest 

 

7. breathe right relax go with the flow, sing a tune in your head to find rhythm

 

c.

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I do wide walking shots on a 18 or 20mm lens and you do have to adjust your feet and legs as shock absorbers and walk in a smooth gliding way .....not normal clunky steps

I also tie myself to the talent round the waist with a piece of rope for head shots on a 50mm lens so the distance between us remains the same and they do have to walk exactly as fast as you do to keep a narrow dof .

 

lots of takes usually gets the shot you need. .....4 seconds is how long I like to cut each shot...less is more !

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Ciao!

In these days I'm using monopod more and more, especially for medium shot and close up, thanks to the faster workflow compared to my trusty tripod 501HDV.

I sold my Flycam some weeks ago and, after reading that "Dallas Buyers Club" was shot mostly handheld, I am very motivated to become a good handheld shooter, because I loved the cinematography of the movie :)

Untill I stand still I have pretty good results shooting with a GorillaPod SRL Zoom (with ballhead) and with a little cheap shoulder rig.

But, as soon I start to walk following the talent I have shaky shots. 

Of course I use a wide angle lens stopped down, but the results are quite distracting...
I saw some great films (and videos) that show the talent walking perfectly  in focus, with a nice shallow DOF... so I'm pretty sure I need some hint to improve my technique :)

Could you help me? 
 

I've built myself this shoulder rig:

 

8zlo28.jpg

 

I know it looks terrible! but it works ok.

I also learnt how to walk properly watching this video:

 

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i am one of the biggest lovers of handheld and one of the worst shakiest camera women out there.

 

my advice 

1. gym, no way to do handheld if you have chicken wings for biceps

 

2.try to walk with your knees bended a bit  difficult but works (think of your knees as car suspensions keep them bended)

 

3.if you go completely handheld (no monopod) then control the shake by actually enhancing it in a rythm  up and down 

 

4.use the camera strap on your neck as balance and extend it with the camera 

 

5. use a pillow, crazy but works if you have nothing, just strap a pillow in your chest and rest your elbows on it.. (Chris Doyle dp )

 

6. in general use your elbows against your chest 

 

7. breathe right relax go with the flow, sing a tune in your head to find rhythm

 

c.

Huge thanks Christina! :)
Point #5 is just genial! 

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I also tie myself to the talent round the waist with a piece of rope for head shots on a 50mm lens so the distance between us remains the same and they do have to walk exactly as fast as you do to keep a narrow dof .

 

lots of takes usually gets the shot you need. .....4 seconds is how long I like to cut each shot...less is more !

Great tips! Thank you very much Andy! :)

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