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Should I buy this BM Micro Kit or forget about it and buy Samsung NX1


Shepard HS
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22 minutes ago, tugela said:

I suspect there are going to be better lenses for all cameras in a few years anyway, as lenses become more integrated as complementary electronic components in a holistic imaging system. 

I suspect the opposite - and it's already happening in cellphone photography, compact cameras and mirrorless systems like MFT: Fully corrected, high-resolution images are and will continue to be expensive to manufacture. These are simply the laws of optics and physics. The workaround is to design cheaper optics with known optical aberrations, and correct them in software (i.e. through in-firmware photoshopping). More powerful CPUs/SoCs will also mean that more powerful image reconstruction algorithms (like superresolution) can be used. The downside of this is that images look overengineered, artificial, oversharpened etc. So for true optical quality, and high-quality images, you will still hold on to your expensive classic photo/cinema lenses.

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On July 21, 2016 at 10:34 AM, Damphousse said:

I keep my $800+ lenses for a lot longer than 4-5 years.  A good lens is a lifetime purchase.  My canon L lenses work on my canon film cameras, my canon DSLR, and my BMPCC.  IS works even on the BMPCC with speedbooster.

The Samsung lenses will be paperweights in a few years.  Total false economy.

@Damphousse  Your comments about the lens are true are why I bought the Sigma in the Nikon mount.  I do, however, think it's funny that the "professionals" on here all knock the NX1 because the company closed their camera business.  I can  honestly say that since the day they closed their business, especially with the hacks, the camera footage has actually gotten better.  Imagine that...people loving a camera so much they continually try to improve it :)  Shooting videos of my kids, I, like most people in the world, don't need an Arri Alexa.  If you only have $1200 to spend...you could do worse than the NX1...

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On 21 July 2016 at 9:09 PM, cantsin said:

I suspect the opposite - and it's already happening in cellphone photography, compact cameras and mirrorless systems like MFT: Fully corrected, high-resolution images are and will continue to be expensive to manufacture. These are simply the laws of optics and physics. The workaround is to design cheaper optics with known optical aberrations, and correct them in software (i.e. through in-firmware photoshopping). More powerful CPUs/SoCs will also mean that more powerful image reconstruction algorithms (like superresolution) can be used. The downside of this is that images look overengineered, artificial, oversharpened etc. So for true optical quality, and high-quality images, you will still hold on to your expensive classic photo/cinema lenses.

I also think this to be true.

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On 7/21/2016 at 1:42 PM, tugela said:

I suspect there are going to be better lenses for all cameras in a few years anyway, as lenses become more integrated as complementary electronic components in a holistic imaging system. In many ways, most lenses around today are still holdouts from the past. It will be the sort of transition that the avionics industry went through, when wireless flight became adopted.

With or without the bit rate hacks? I imagine that blacks are among the first to go when compression is applied, so higher bit rates should preserve them better.

I have no problem with the NX1.  I just caution people about the other parts of the system.  I'm on a budget.  I don't have the money to rebuy all my lenses every 4-5 years.  I actually held off on buying even Canon APS-C EFS lenses because I always "knew" I was going to move up to full frame.  When video appeared on the scene and Canon made the 17-55mm 2.8 EFS I finally bought the lens because I could see using it for a long time and it holding its value.

To be honest if I was a pro and the NX1 was making me money I would be more inclined to use it.  But for a hobbyist's camera setup I need stuff to hold its value for a long time and have excellent resale value.  I'm just very price sensitive.  I can't buy a $500 lens and take a $300 hit on it.

On 7/21/2016 at 1:42 PM, tugela said:

I suspect there are going to be better lenses for all cameras in a few years anyway, as lenses become more integrated as complementary electronic components in a holistic imaging system. In many ways, most lenses around today are still holdouts from the past. It will be the sort of transition that the avionics industry went through, when wireless flight became adopted.

The only time I the history of the camera industry I can think of where there was a seismic shift in the lens value was with the rise of digital.  And that was mainly a Canon issue since their FD lenses didn't work with their DSLRs.  Of course now with mirrorless cameras and adapters those FD lenses are having a second life.

For the non test chart crowd a high quality Canon prime or L lens will serve them well for many years to come.  Well there could be a game changer a few years out but I'm not going to trade my L glass for Samsung glass because of it.  I'll start a thread.  I'm actually surprised no one has posted about it...  Or maybe I just missed it.

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