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filmvoltage

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filmvoltage last won the day on August 21 2013

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  1. Meh, I've found that the younger generation who has grown up with this HDTV "Smoothscan" tech abomination actually PREFERS the artificial and sped-up "soap opera" look, and they prefer the higher frame rates. That said, most theater projectors sold in the past few years can do lower framerate HFR, but this latest format is going to be VERY expensive for theaters to adopt. It requires two very expensive projectors linked together, so only the very large venues in the very large cities will upgrade. Keep in mind that an entry level, 9000 lumen 2k DCI projector with IMB costs about $32,000. Hooking up two of these Barco 4k Laser HFR HDR 3-D projectors will probably cost at least $350,000. Granted, the price will come down, but still, it'll take 7-10 years to pay off such a large investment for early adopters. One big tech item to keep an eye on is MagicLeap and their new hyper-virtual reality glasses. Magicleap is talking about putting photons on glass directly without "pixels" and totally augmenting reality without goggles. A MagicLeap-like tech, combined with HFR and HDR is probably going to be the norm in less than ten years. It would be cool to see the technologies combined. The projected image on the screen could provide depth, and the VR could provide the "wow" factor of stuff literally flying around in the room. But what's most interesting, is that from what I've read about MagicLeap is that it could simply replace the projector entirely, since the image in the MagicLeap headset is entirely recreated from reality. People would just come into a theater, put on the glasses, and stare at a calibration screen/image on a wall, and everything else would be VR.
  2. The 4.6k is supposed to have 15 stops, not 14, but in reality it will probably work out to 11-12 usable stops. I just with BM would put out some more test footage of the 4.6k sensor. I can deal with the wait, I'd just like to know if it's worth waiting for. Also, does this new mini-ursa have a different "2.0" 4k chip than the original ursa? Sony FS5 is going to be announced tomorrow, and I have a feeling Sony's going to have another "Mic Drop" like they did last year with the FS7 and A7s.
  3. Andrew, the Rep from KINE said in the interview that the new 6K KINErecorder would cost as much as the base model KINE ($3,200)  
  4. The price for the basic camera is $3,200 (US).  But if you want the ability to record to the upcoming "6K" Kine recorder, you're going to have to spring for the $4,700 model. http://www.kineraw.com/enproduct.asp?EnBigClassName=KineRAW-MINI&EnSmallClassName=Price_Package So, you're looking at around $8,000 for 4K RAW. with the Kine camera and the Kine recorder (priced at around $3,200) The BMCC 4K is looking to be the best value for 4K RAW, at least for the time being...when it comes out.
  5. The BlackMagic Pocket Cinema Camera has arrived at Wooden camera.  Here are some of the demo videos: BMPCC overview http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8gTZ0XS9LDM&feature=c4-overview&list=UUZt-vOtUh9DzT05lMAQXMDg   Accesory Kits http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNmZOuSh0_c&feature=c4-overview&list=UUZt-vOtUh9DzT05lMAQXMDg   BMPCC Camera configurations http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K2_rV58kulE&feature=c4-overview&list=UUZt-vOtUh9DzT05lMAQXMDg   M/4/3rds to PL mount adapter http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmFf5b7nGR4&feature=c4-overview&list=UUZt-vOtUh9DzT05lMAQXMDg    
  6. This is an interesting development.  One can argue that the Canon engineers pretty much knew that the camera was capable of 24p with the higher (1000x) cards, as it's not like the flash memory manufacturers aren't testing their products with all of the various camera companies prior to their release.  The 1000x cards have been out for a year and a half now, so it's safe to say that Canon engineers knew full well that the MKIII was capable of RAW recording using (the fastest) CF cards. That said, RAW video isn't something Canon has dabbled in extensively at that prosumer level and price point.  So even though the feature was obviously workable, it may not have been guaranteed/developed in time for the camera's release.  Canon can't deliver a camera worldwide and advertise such an important feature and have it cause their cameras to crash/overheat because they didn't have time to test it out. As for this news trouncing BMCC/BMPC/BMCC4K?  Meh.  The hack, I'm certain, is welcome for those that already own the camera, but really, unless you already own a ton of Canon glass, the MKIII isn't a "must buy" now that it has 1080p RAW via a hacked firmware update.  The BMPC camera pretty much equals the apparent quality of new haxored MKIII at three times less the price.  Granted you don't get full frame, but if you really need FF, then feel free to pay three times the price.  It IS a bargain if you need FF-RAW. Regardless, this is good news.  Hopefully Canon will embrace this, and release their own firmware update instead of trying to pretend the same people that can afford the MKIII are the same people that can afford their c100/c300 pro line.  The CF card costs are actually reasonable if you're getting RAW FF for the price of a really good CF card.  Another good plus of getting a 1000x card is that they dump to storage -really- fast.   Now all Magic Lantern has to do to REALLY shake things up is offer 1080p RAW on the T4i/T5i. :)
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