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Digital is RUBBISH!


richg101

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nah.. Digital isnt really rubbish, but in comparison to 70mm film it is!

http://uk.imdb.com/title/tt1560747/technical

I just saw the trailer for 'The Master'. Wondered why it looked so good and checked the specs. Panavision Super70 is the answer. Just WOW. Wonder what Hasselblad lenses were used?
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shot on 65mm film

[b] Filming[/b]

Filming was to begin in August 2010 with Renner starring opposite Hoffman, but was postponed indefinitely in September 2010. In May 2011, after securing financing, the film was given the [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green-light"]green-light[/url] and filming began in early June 2011 in [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vallejo,_California"]Vallejo[/url] and [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacramento,_California"]Sacramento[/url].Shooting took place on [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mare_Island"]Mare Island[/url] for a month using the wing of an old hospital and an empty admiral’s mansion for some scenes.In late June 2011 filming took place at [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hillside_Elementary_School"]Hillside Elementary School[/url] in [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berkeley,_California"]Berkeley[/url].
The film was shot on [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/70_mm_film"]65mm[/url] film using the [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_Panavision_70#Panavision_System_65.2FSuper_70"]Panavision System 65[/url] camera.The film was the first fiction film to be shot in 65mm since [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_Branagh"]Kenneth Branagh[/url]'s [i][url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamlet_%281996_film%29"]Hamlet[/url][/i] in 1996 [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mihai_Malaimare_Jr."]Mihai Malaimare, Jr.[/url] served as cinematographer, making [i]The Master[/i] Anderson's first film without cinematographer [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Elswit"]Robert Elswit[/url]. Originally, Anderson and Malaimare planned to shoot mainly portraits in 65mm, which constituted 20% of the film, but ultimately 85% of the film was shot in 65mm.The remainder of the film was shot on [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/35mm"]35mm[/url] using [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panavision_cameras#Panaflex_Millennium"]Panavision Millennium XL2s[/url] cameras, often used for scenes that required a "dirtier" look. Most of the [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_stock"]film stocks[/url] used were [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_motion_picture_film_stocks#VISION3_color_negative_.28ECN-2_process_2007.E2.80.93present.29"]KODAK VISION3 50D Color Negative Film 5203[/url] and KODAK VISION3 200T Color Negative Film 5213 with a few scenes were also done with KODAK VISION3 250D Color Negative Film 5207 and KODAK VISION3 500T 5219



Panavision website has this

[b]65MM Panaflex System 65 Studio Camera - 65SPFX[/b]

The Panaflex System 65 camera was introduced in 1991 as an update to their previous cameras known as Panavision System 65 or Panavision Super 70. It uses all Panavision 65mm lenses and 65mm accessories and 400 foot or 1000 foot displacement film magazines may be top mounted to minimize camera length or rear mounted to minimize camera height.

The standard color corrected optical viewfinder is one of the brightest viewfinders on a 65mm camera and features the standard Panaglow illuminated frame lines found on all Panavision cameras and it also contains a control for the brightness of the Panaglow. Viewfinders are available in short, intermediate and long configurations, allowing both studio and hand held configurations. The intermediate and long viewfinders contain an image magnifier for critical eye focus. A wide variety of ground glasses are available with any marking or combination of markings.

The camera has a crystal controlled speed range of 4-36 fps forward. The camera does not run in reverse. An adjustable focal plane shutter range of 50-180 degrees, full-fitting dual registration pins with guide blocks on one side of the film and dual two-pin pull down claws make this one of the quietest film cameras in the world. Sound levels have been measured at less than 26 dB with film.

A standard Panavision video tap is available for flicker free filming at all available speeds. The tap is available for both PAL and NTSC. Dual displays provide data to both sides of the camera and includes film speed, exposed footage in feet or meters and shutter angle. An annunciator panel on the side of the camera contains warning lights for low battery, illegal speed, film jam. low film and out of film. Other camera features include a switch to block light from the eyepiece, two contrast-viewing filters (0.6 and 0.9 neutral density), and built in camera body and eyepiece heaters.

As with all Panavision cameras, the System 65 comes with the standard complement of accessories including 24 volt batteries, power and heater cables, System 65 Flexlight, matte box with sunshade extension, iris rod bracket, iris rods, 4.5 filter ring and lens port cover. Additional accessories are available based on the needs of the production.


[b]65MM HR Spinning Mirror Reflex Camera System - 65HSSM[/b]

The Panaflex 65mm HR Spinning Mirror Reflex Camera uses all [url="http://www.panavision.com/node/293"]Panavision 65mm lenses[/url] and 65mm accessories and 400 foot or 1000 foot displacement film magazines. The standard, fixed, optical viewfinder is one of the brightest viewfinders on a 65mm camera and features the standard Panaglow illuminated frame lines found on all Panavision cameras. A wide variety of ground glasses are available with any marking or combination of markings.

The camera has a crystal controlled speed range of 4-72 fps forward. The camera does not run in reverse. Standard on the camera is a fixed 170 degree shutter, full-fitting dual registration pins and dual pull down claws. The camera is suitable for time lapse or time exposure cinematography. A standard Panavision video tap is available for flicker free filming at all available speeds. The tap is available for both PAL and NTSC.

As with all Panavision cameras, the camera comes with the standard complement of accessories including 24 volt batteries, power cables, matte box and follow focus unit
Additional accessories are available based on the needs of the production.
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this is a good read on the lenses the used

[b] [i]The Master[/i]: Framed in 65mm for Maximum Visual Impact[/b]

[b] [/b]

Published on website: September 26, 2012
Categories: [url="http://motion.kodak.com/motion/Publications/InCamera/65mm/BlogCategory.htm"]65mm[/url] , [url="http://motion.kodak.com/motion/Publications/InCamera/Feature_Films/BlogCategory.htm"]Feature Films[/url] , [url="http://motion.kodak.com/motion/Publications/InCamera/Sections/Focus_on_Film/index.htm"]Focus On Film[/url] , [url="http://motion.kodak.com/motion/Publications/InCamera/FilmStock/VISION3_200T_Color_Negative_Film/index.htm"]VISION3 200T Color Negative Film 5213/7213[/url] , [url="http://motion.kodak.com/motion/Publications/InCamera/FilmStock/VISION3_500T_Color_Negative_Film/index.htm"]VISION3 500T Color Negative Film 5219/7219[/url] , [url="http://motion.kodak.com/motion/Publications/InCamera/FilmStock/VISION3_250D_Color_Negative_Film/index.htm"]VISION3 250D Color Negative Film 5207/7207[/url] , [url="http://motion.kodak.com/motion/Publications/InCamera/FilmStock/VISION3_50D_Color_Negative_Film/index.htm"]VISION3 50D Color Negative Film 5203/7203[/url] , [url="http://motion.kodak.com/motion/Publications/InCamera/Sections/Large_Format/index.htm"]Large Format[/url]

[url="http://motion.kodak.com/motion/Publications/InCamera/The_Master_Framed_in_65mm_for_Maximum_Visual_Impact.htm#"]18[/url]

[img]http://motion.kodak.com/motion/_rz/uploadedImages/Kodak/motion/InCamera/InCamera_The_Master_Header_620X0.jpg[/img]
Joaquin Phoenix in The Master. © 2012 - The Weinstein Company
[img]http://motion.kodak.com/motion/uploadedImages/Kodak/motion/InCamera/InCamera_The_Master3.jpg[/img]
Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams in The Master. © 2012 - The Weinstein Company
[img]http://motion.kodak.com/motion/uploadedImages/Kodak/motion/InCamera/InCamera_The_Master2.jpg[/img]
Philip Seymour Hoffman and Joaquin Phoenix in The Master. © 2012 - The Weinstein Company
[img]http://motion.kodak.com/motion/uploadedImages/Kodak/motion/InCamera/InCamera_The_Master1.jpg[/img]
Paul Thomas Anderson and Joaquin Phoenix in The Master. © 2012 - The Weinstein Company
Mihai Malaimare Jr. burst onto the international cinematography scene in 2005 with [i]Youth Without Youth[/i], which he shot for Francis Ford Coppola. Malaimare caught Coppola’s eye while shooting screen tests in the cameraman’s native Romania. They went on to make two more features together, 2008’s [i]Tetro[/i], a noirish black and white, and 2010’s [i]Twixt Now[/i] and [i]Sunrise[/i]. Malaimare latest collaboration [i]The Master[/i], directed by Paul Thomas Anderson is now hitting cinema screens in 70mm glory.
[i]The Master[/i] has some parallels in real life, but Anderson uses the story of a charismatic healer (Philip Seymour Hoffman) and his damaged acolyte (Joaquin Phoenix) to delve into the human condition rather than to chronicle historical events. The story begins in the period following World War II. Locations included the San Francisco Bay area as well as a few locales in Hawaii and in southern California. Amy Adams and Laura Dern also star.
[i]The Master[/i] was photographed on 65mm film, which results in significantly greater image area and a palpable bump in depth, clarity and emotional impact on the screen. The decision to go with the larger format was made after a long testing period. “I’m in love with still photography,” says Malaimare in explanation. “Freddie, Joaquin’s character, is working in a portrait studio. Paul had the idea to try a larger format, partly because when you think of iconic still photography from this period, you think of really shallow depth of field, the result of large format negatives, like the classic images taken with Speed Graphic 4X5 cameras. We tested VistaVision, but there were some limitations there.”
The 65 and 70mm film formats have been around since before 1900, but got underway seriously as a capture and exhibition format in the 1950s, when theaters were under siege from television. In 1955, Todd-AO used a 65mm negative and 70mm-wide prints to deliver enhanced visuals (and audio) on pictures like [i]Oklahoma[/i]! Landmarks in cinematography history like [i]Lawrence of Arabia, The Sound of Music[/i], and [i]Ryan’s Daughter[/i] used later 65mm formats. Lately, the 65mm gauge has enjoyed a renaissance, as filmmakers like Christopher Nolan and Wally Pfister, ASC, BSC have used it to boost visual impact in narrative features including [i]Inception[/i], triggering upgrades in the supporting technology along the way. Ron Fricke’s latest visual poem, [i]Samsara[/i], was also filmed around the world using 65mm film.
Anderson and Malaimare initially planned to shoot mainly portraits with 65 mm, about 20% of the movie. Even in situations where audiences are not seeing a 70mm print, the 65mm-originated scenes deliver breathtaking images that draw viewers into the story.
“As we were looking at dailies, we saw that every 65mm shot was so amazing,” says Malaimare. “After a week or two of shooting, we switched, and ended up shooting something like 85% of the movie on 5-perf 65mm.”
The 35mm cameras – Panavision Millennium XL2s – were brought out for handheld scenes, or other shots that required a dirtier look. “When your eyes are accustomed to what 65mm looks like in terms of grain and depth of field, with these amazing landscapes, switching over to a smaller negative area, you perceive the difference immediately,” says Malaimare.

[b][i]To augment the “crispy” Speed Graphic look, “Panavized” Hasselblad and Schneider lenses were used with the Panavision System 65 and 65 HR film cameras. To smooth the transition between 65mm and 35mm, Malaimare used a Swiss Jena still lens converted by Panavision for use with 35mm. Dan Sasaki at Panavision also found a complete 35mm set of Zeiss Jena glass. A set of Ultra Speeds was also used with the 35mm format, depending on the situation.
The aspect ratio of the movie is 1.85:1. 65mm’s native aspect ratio is 2.20:1, although 65 mm-originated images are often projected at 2.40:1. Here, Malaimare and Anderson framed for 1.85:1 in both 65mm and 35mm, sacrificing some image area on the negative but gaining a consistent frame throughout the movie.[/i][/b]
Much of [i]The Master[/i] was filmed with KODAK VISION3 50D Color Negative Film 5203 and KODAK VISION3 200T Color Negative Film 5213. A few scenes were also done with KODAK VISION3 250D Color Negative Film 5207 and KODAK VISION3 500T 5219 as well. In keeping with the desire for maximum image quality, the postproduction workflow was completely photochemical, with no digital intermediate process. The 35mm material was handled at Deluxe Labs and the 65mm material was processed at FotoKem in Burbank, which is set up to handle optical reduction to 35mm for dailies and workprints.
“Paul really believes in the photochemical process,” says Malaimare. “It delivers better quality. If you scan a 65mm negative, it will give you at least 8K resolution for the DI, but that is definitely expensive. Maybe it’s a matter of respect for the format. It’s about the approach you take. If you know from the beginning that you don’t want to scan, you’re more careful with the lighting and everything. With a DI, you tend to be sloppier because you know you can fix and hide things later. By using the large, low speed negative, not using any filters in from of the lens, and using these very sharp lenses, you get extremely high image quality – and you don’t want to ruin that with a scanner.”
Growing up in Bucharest, Malaimare was the son of a theater actor and director. The theater’s lighting grid was the teenaged Malaimare’s playground. At age 15, he was given a camera, and his future became clear. Soon he had a darkroom and was taking photography classes after his regular studies.
Today, Malaimare is focused on the cinematography of his films, because he doesn’t want to dwell on the unlikely path he’s followed to success. “I do believe things happen for a reason,” he says. “In Romania, the film school is really film training. We shot everything on film. We have two black and white film labs at the school, and very intense still photography courses. For some reason, a few months before meeting Paul, I bought a Crown Graphic 4X5 camera, one of 12 still cameras I own. We ended up using that camera as a prop on [i]The Master[/i]. I also used it to shoot The Master’s portrait with 4X5 black-and-white negative. When you have that type of training and background, and you get the opportunity to apply things you already know, maybe it is better not to think too much. It’s better to just relate to things you know and go forward.”
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[background=rgb(255, 255, 255)]Read more: [url="http://motion.kodak.com/motion/Publications/InCamera/The_Master_Framed_in_65mm_for_Maximum_Visual_Impact.htm#ixzz2B6kEWsbI"]http://motion.kodak....m#ixzz2B6kEWsbI[/url][/background][/left]
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