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瞿盛龙

NX1's shutter speed control during the video recording

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averaging two frames should be completely equal to doubling the shutter time. i think we can agree on that :grin:

if you're into avisynth: qtgmc contains a part where it can simulate motion blur, i.e. when you discard one field on interlaced source, making it half shutter angle. OR when you set your shutter speed too high, cause this is something that's not as easy. but that's a very exceptional case...

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38 minutes ago, MountneerMan said:

I understand the principles of shutter speed (and traditional shutter angle). What the video doesn't address is the ability for some cameras to "replicate" a slower shutter speed than frame rate. eg. 1/10 sec x 24fps = 2.4sec worth of exposure every second = physically impossible

I have no idea how it does it technological, all I know is from working on film cameras on some you can expose multiple frame for longer when having a slower shutter than the frames per second the film rolls in, I am going to assume it works the same for digital cameras from the ones I have worked with, this is my subjective personal experience. I ain't no scientist but it did the job and that is good for me. Less I gotta do in post, better.

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1 hour ago, SMGJohn said:

I have no idea how it does it technological, all I know is from working on film cameras on some you can expose multiple frame for longer when having a slower shutter than the frames per second the film rolls in, I am going to assume it works the same for digital cameras from the ones I have worked with, this is my subjective personal experience. I ain't no scientist but it did the job and that is good for me. Less I gotta do in post, better.

I don't see how that is possible either, because you have to move the frame out of the light path for the next frame to be exposed. Unless you reduce the frame rate you cannot decrease the shutter speed below that. It is not physically possible. When you are working with digital data you can average the results of several frames to produce new composite frame. I would guess that a camera could do this internally with the raw data, but that would require a fundamental change in how the data is processed (and greatly increase demands on the processor itself). Because of that I am sceptical that many (or even any) cameras really do this, even if they report "slower" shutter speeds to the user.

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16 minutes ago, tugela said:

I don't see how that is possible either, because you have to move the frame out of the light path for the next frame to be exposed. Unless you reduce the frame rate you cannot decrease the shutter speed below that. It is not physically possible. When you are working with digital data you can average the results of several frames to produce new composite frame. I would guess that a camera could do this internally with the raw data, but that would require a fundamental change in how the data is processed (and greatly increase demands on the processor itself). Because of that I am sceptical that many (or even any) cameras really do this, even if they report "slower" shutter speeds to the user.

I am going to assume it exposes the same picture on two frames instead of one when lets say the shutter is 1/15 of a second.

http://www.mediacollege.com/video/camera/shutter/shutter-vs-fps.html

http://media.digitalcameraworld.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/123/2013/08/Camera_shutter_cheat_sheet.jpg

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First saw the slow shutter speeds with the GH2... A good example of this is to shoot an interstate with traffic. The car's tail lights and break lights are all blurred in motion. Trees blowing in the wind with a lot of motion blur is another example. You can gather scratch audio too as the audio will play back at normal speeds.

It actually looks pretty awesome and it's a super simple method for capturing a "timelapse" looking scene. The slow shutter can also be used to gather extra light, so long as there isn't a lot of motion in the scene.

They'd even allow you to go up to a 2-second shutter, if I remember correctly.

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