Jump to content

Michiel78

Members
  • Content Count

    27
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Michiel78

  • Rank
    Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • Location
    Netherlands
  1. Well, I'm just glad I left Canon and Nikon for Panasonic. Bought the cheap G6 for now, but this GH4 lurking around the corner is beautiful, especially with this type of info! Just curious about the workflow though, do you have to process each individual clip through AE before getting 10bit 4:4:4?
  2. This sounds interesting! Could you provide more details please?
  3. Wow! Looks absolutely stunning... made the right choice purchasing the now 300 GBP G6 :) Would like some info on the lenses and adapters too, please.
  4. I'm expecting my new G6 and metabones Speedbooster soon. I'd like to buy the Nikkor 50mm / f1.8 lens, but I'm not sure if I should buy the D or G version? It seems the D-version has it's own aperture-ring, whereas the G is automatic, but can be manually controlled by the speedbooster; however it's not entirely accurate: http://www.slrlounge.com/near-full-frame-in-a-micro-43-camera-the-metabones-speedbooster-nikon-adapter-review The bokeh and sharpness of the G is better and since you'll be focussing more than changing the aperture, the larger focus ring of the G might be better. The price difference is only 50€. Any advice?
  5. I just went this route, Jason, also because in the future with Nikon lenses you could switch back to Nikon DSLR for films (or stills, always loved Nikon for stills). Canon lenses won't fit on the Nikon cams (if I'm correct), but Nikon lenses do fit on Canon DSLRs with an adapter. So, if you go G6+SB or D5300 you're always future proof.
  6. Thanks for confirming the GM1 as a great cam, and that FCPX 10.1 has no issues with AVCHD. I just went for the G6, although I do mind its plasticky body a little bit (the camera vanity indeed), but it's even cheaper than the Speedbooster now! So I'm staying within my 1000€ budget, while opening up an amazing range of lenses for the future.
  7. Honestly, I think it comes down to your personal preferences; which cam 'feels' nicer. While many agree that Canon (without hack) is surpassed by Nikon, Sony and Panasonic; I still feel it delivers quite good quality, it certainly has a better cinematic feel than your average camcorder. I don't know if the RAW hack is available for the 70D, but the AF is quite a nice touch for someone who is new to DSLR; gradually you could go over to MF. D5300 would be a little more challenging as it offers no peaking for example, but video quality as well as stills are very, very good! I started with the 60D, but while I'm waiting for the BMPCC v2.0 or 3.0, in the meantime, I'm placing my bets on m43. Panasonic seems to understand what we videographers need and want, rumors have it they're creating a new organic sensor. And with Olympus on their way, some good things are about to happen in m43-world. 70D crossed my mind, but Canon essentially isn't improving anymore (except for the new AF-system). D5300 was an option too, as I really like Nikon stills, but the Panasonic-series offer peaking and other videographic goodies, and with the Speedbooster, an amazing arsenal of lenses is available. So I bit the bullet and (after some good advice here on the forum) bought the Pana G6 just to start out; it's so cheap now it's no shame to replace it in 1-2 years, while I'm investing now in a Speedbooster and some lenses which will last a lot longer!
  8. Thanks all for your input, going for the G6 and SB... :)
  9. Skip, Sometimes you know the story beforehand, but to me, many times the story comes while filming or editing. Although it's not easy: sometimes you have the story and visuals outlined in your head but can't get them on your screen. That's frustrating and could lead to a form of 'writers block'. But first: I assume you're fully used to your D5300, know your camera, you can set it up quick and easy so you're not missing important shots. It's like a racing driver knowing his car inside out. Then: if you have a story in your head, go out and film it. If you don't have inspiration, no worries: just go to a city or forrest or something you've never been too. Stop fretting about wanting to make that great film, don't shoot yet, just feel the atmosphere, the mood the new surroundings give you. Then try to capture that mood. Some possess this quality naturally, others have to learn it, but if you train this often, you can distill the mood/emotions/story faster and easily convey that to your film. The advice from Brandon is great too, as is Tosvus'. If you see or hear or read something which touch in an emotional way, a song on the radio, a story in an newspaper, a quote on the internet; save it somewhere and use it later. Point I'm trying to make is: inspiration is always there, sometimes we don't know where to look for it, sometimes we're looking too hard for it when it's already there. It's conveying that inspiration to film is what we have to learn. Post-production: personally I find this the most difficult, because I've got the visuals and story or mood in my head, but my shots are not what I envisioned them to be. Sometimes I really have to push myself to start editing, use all the anti-procrastionation techniques, and once I've taken that hurdle, many times it flows from there. Don't let the drive for perfection get you, I've heard many great filmmakers are not entirely happy with the films they've made, even if they've won numerous awards and the public loves them... Just try and convey your story, and about the noise or neat video: story comes first. Even if an image is not up to your standards from a technical point of view, but it is essential in conveying an emotion, use it! Hell, Philip Bloom made a compelling story filmed with a VGA-Barbie-camera ;) And if, after editing, it's not really the masterpiece you've wanted, so what... It's not like Van Gogh or Rembrandt always painted masterpieces every time, but from every trial you learn, and this leads to experience, which maybe makes your next movie into a masterpiece, or at least your filming-life a little bit easier ;) Good luck.
  10. It's just that the GX7 or GM1 are so much more good-looking compared to the G6, but in the end, I think Julian and you are right... since the GH4 and other m43 cams are around the corner (imagine what would happen if Olympus got their video codecs right), it makes more sense to invest in SB en Nikon glass which can be used over and over again, and a lot less in a camera which probably will be replaced in 2 years. Also, the mic-input is an added bonus which I definitely like.
  11. Thanks Julian. Funny we're talking English here while both from the Netherlands ;) I'm considering the G6, but although it's the cheapest option, it uses a relative older sensor than the GX7 and GM1, but it has peaking. I like the G6 audio-input, the better EVF. It seems have to decide if I take my camera bag with me or not... I'm planning to use a small backpack so GX7+20mm will fit... choices choices...
  12. Just curious about your opinion. I'm going to visit Japan and New Zealand and I'd like a small cam for video as well as stills. I'm switching from my Canon 60D to m43 (don't have a lot of glass so no problem). Thought about the BMPCC but think it's better to wait for v2.0, and I loose the stills. Thought about the D5300, great for stills and video, but slightly too large, and not really optimized for video (no focus peaking, aperture-problems etc). Right now I'm thinking about the GM1 or GX7. Both are small enough for my taste, use the same sensor en processor, so IQ should be the same. My considerations: GM1 I like the small size and looks of this cam, but I'm worrying most about its ergonomics, especially when filming and using manual focus filming handheld. I'd like the Panasonic 20mm/1.7 II but it has no stabilisation and it's a little bit to large for the body, so a monopod or small tripod could be difficult. I won't be using a rig. But, since the GM1 cheaper than the GX7, I can buy the Speedbooster Nikon to m43 and use its tripod collar instead. Lenswise I'd go for the Nikon 50/1.8 or equivalent. The size-difference between GX7 or GM1 with Speedbooster would be eliminated of course. GX7 Its a bit less refined than the GX7, although I really like the beefy grip, so ergonomically it should be better. I've tried the EVF and although I see the seq-field problems, and don't think it's problematic and could be handy in the field. It's more expensive than the GM1, but when it comes bundled with the 20mm/1.7 II the price difference with the GM1is small. Also I like the 50p and MP4 video-modes, so its easier for my Macbook when pre-editing en route (make the final edit at home). Essentially it comes down to this: Would you go for GM1 + speedbooster and open the world of Nikon-mount lenses or go for the GX7 + 20mm (and bonus MP4 en 50p). Of course I could always buy the SB for the GX7 as well, but it goes a little over budget then, because I need to buy now and cannot wait for the new Panasonic-series showing up this year.
  13. Personally Jurgen, I wouldn't risk further harming your sensor and go to the store you've bought the camera for advice. Many specialized camerastores are experienced in cleaning your cam/sensors and will do it for a small fee or sometimes free of charge. And otherwise they will ship it to an official repair center. I don't know, but if you're using a small microfiber cloth (for cleaning lenses or glasses or such) I think it has to be absolutely clean for any impurities on it could scratch your sensor... But... found some useful links: http://www.mu-43.com/showthread.php?t=21725 and http://photosol.com/product/sensor-swab-plus-4-pack-type-1/ It seems the SensorSwab is pre-moistened with cleaning solution, so I assume it would remove fingerprints as well, and it's packed sterile so no impurities that could damage your sensor. I don't have any experience with SensorSwabs myself so use it at your own risk :)
  14. Hey Matt, very nice video. Deep and beautiful colors. Is it me or does the footage (especially where you're panning over the leaves) have some sort of wobbly/wavy feeling. I think its the FCPX stabilization but could you please confirm this?
×
×
  • Create New...