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Schneider x2 anamorphic - GH4 shooting advice


fabre8

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Right off the bat, 

                              I know projection lenses are a bit of a no, no in terms of shooting anamorphic (especially on this site), but I just had to impulse buy this Schneider projection lens on eBay when it was valued for £80.

I am having trouble lining up the anamorphic lens with my primes; in some cases I get nice crisp images, and sometimes I get visible distortion after 'expanding' the 4:3 footage horizontally.

Are there any sure-fire ways to make sure the alignment is top notch?  here's a video I shot as a test, let me know if you notice any glaring errors: 

I know, it's YouTube so it's compressed, but at this point I'm mostly worried about my 'tunnel vision' and not seeing the distortion properly

Feedback is greatly appreciated!

Thanks!!!!

Francois 

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Francois, to my untrained eye, the footage looks good!

What resolution are you shooting?  Instead of expanding footage horizontally, have you tried squashing footage vertically to compare results?

Are particular prime lenses more troublesome than others? How do you have your Schneider mounted? This is my approach:

  • Build a dedicated 15mm rail platform for each anamorphic lens
  • Test (and re-test) alignment & focus for each platform in a controlled environment using a high-detail test pattern
  • Mark the positions on the anamorphic & its platform for future reference, and lock everything down
  • Different positions/markings may be required for each taking lens

Keep in mind I am a novice, and others out there almost certainly have better methods (and will hopefully share them in this post).

I know projection lenses are a bit of a no, no in terms of shooting anamorphic (especially on this site),

 

I must be really annoying folks with all my posts, then :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

I've watched a lot of test footage, some using film anamorphics which resulted in mediocre footage, some using projection anamorphics which resulted in fantastic footage. What counts is the final image, it doesn't matter how you achieve it in my opinion.

Hope this helps, and keep on shooting!

Cheers,

|. . | .|

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Hi Bold, 

             First of all: what a Bold statement, hahahahaha, but seriously; thank you for the advice! My company liked the footage and they want me to use the kit on the next shoot we'll be doing next week, so I want to make sure I get everything right on the day (I threw away a lot of footage I recorded on the day of the film above because of distortion, etc.)

  • Build a dedicated 15mm rail platform for each anamorphic lens
  • Test (and re-test) alignment & focus for each platform in a controlled environment using a high-detail test pattern

- What would you recommend using when you say 'using a high-detail test pattern'? A focus sheet?  

- I have a nice looking 15mm rail platform to operate on (although it's a bit heavy for my tripod sometimes, as you'll notice in the film): 

12071608_10156140192385387_989823897_n.t

It also has a nice Mattebox system for all my filter needs! 

it's really encouraging to see that I'm not getting too shunned from using a projection lens; but hey! I'm working on a budget! So thanks a lot for all the great tips, Bold, I'll make sure to print out goodies (like focus sheets) to put me on the right track.

Francois

 

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- What would you recommend using when you say 'using a high-detail test pattern'? A focus sheet?  

Exactly — either ordering a focus chart (expensive) or finding one online and printing it (free).  I'm considering a middle option: Making a high res image, and taking the file to a local print shop to have it printed on large paper (2' x 3' or larger maybe) and mounting it on poster board.  I'll probably overlay a grid or have one printed on the other side for gauging barrel distortion, like this person did with wide angle adapters (bottom of the page).

- I have a nice looking 15mm rail platform to operate on (although it's a bit heavy for my tripod sometimes, as you'll notice in the film): 

Yep, weight is often a drawback when using projection lenses. But the setup looks good!

it's really encouraging to see that I'm not getting too shunned from using a projection lens; but hey! I'm working on a budget! So thanks a lot for all the great tips, Bold,

I'm not aware of any 'projection-lens shaming' on the forums.  Making the most with the tools available to you  there's nothing wrong with that!  Please post back if you discovery any useful tips or observations, and best of luck with the shoot!

 

 

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