Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'c-series'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type



Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • started by

    end


Last Updated

  • started by

    end


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • started by

    end


Group


Website URL


Facebook


Twitter


WhatsApp


Instagram


Skype


Location


Interests


My cameras and kit

Found 2 results

  1. Shot on Alexa with 50mm Panavision C-Series @ stops between 1.4-2.8 with almost no second takes, so some of this is focus-pulling from the gods.
  2. All of Edgar Wright's films have had impressive or, at the very least, quite pleasing and slick cinematography and his most recent installment to his and Simon Pegg's "Cornetto Trilogy", The World's End, is no exception.  There's a great feature article covering the style and technical approach to the film in the September issue of American Cinematographer Magazine (http://www.theasc.com/ac_magazine/September2013/current.php).   When it got to the lens selection for the anamorphic portions of the film (once the scifi madness kicks in) I wasn't at all surprised that Wright and his DP went for a classic sampling that included C-Series lenses for their greater character versus new cinema anamorphics.  Wright likes to shine lights into the lens as much as anyone here (and he does it so much better than JJ Abrams).  Coincidentally, Panavision made a discovery at their Woodland Hills location, a B-Series that Panavision had failed to catalog and been long forgotten.      Given the way a lot of discussions go around here over this anamorphic or that anamorphic, I had to smile when I read the part where this DP praises aberration and soft edges.           ...and I always like when they go into this sort of detail, about working or target stops used on a film.  Anyway, it's a nicely detailed story about a contemporary anamorphic film that's worth grabbing an issue for.     Only God Forgives is likewise covered in this issue, and though it's not anamorphic it is, very surprisingly, a mostly practicals show with very few cinema lights used.  Having seen the film it's almost too hard to believe the information in the article. 
×
×
  • Create New...