Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Andrew Reid

Panasonic GM1 review - another pocket cinema camera

Recommended Posts

Thanks for pointing me to the Thread. I will do a reset to factory defaults. Then I will check some settings according to the PV thread. But as far as I could see the day before yesterday, sharpness setting is almost pointless regarding moiré/aliasing on GM1. The thing what helped was putting an uncleaned lens from around WWII. Aquivalent to sharpness -256 ;)

:) That seems to be the general consensus: using vintage lenses...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
EOSHD Pro Color for Sony cameras EOSHD Pro LOG for Sony CamerasEOSHD C-LOG and Film Profiles for All Canon DSLRs

Hi

I have done some filming and the cam gives stunning pictures. But as soon as there are fine lines in the picture...it gives really terrible Moiré and Aliasing in all Video Modes. 

I have read that it is worse than GH2 but... I did a very unsientific comparison with the BMPCC (mnaual glas on GM1, same glass + SB on Pocket), then the BMPCC does actually a LOT better than the GM1! I can almost spot moiré pattern on the peaking display and I hope that there is something wrong with my cam.

Seeing Oil colors on far away fences is no fun.

Did anyone experience the same?

Anyone with a suggestion what to test or to try?

Sharpness & iDynamic is allredy tested.

factory defaults did the trick! First timer with a Pana cam.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Recently, I've been shooting with both the GM1 and A7R and the GM1 seems to produce more moire/aliasing than the A7R.  The A7R puts out a slightly softer image but it sharpens very nicely in post (FCP).  This was quite a shock, given the way both have been assessed on this site.  I'm finding the A7R holds up much better in general and particularly when shooting landscapes while panning.  The GM1 produces lots of shimmer/moire with fine foliage while the A7R is very clean.

 

I would be interested to know whether these cameras were actually assessed by EOSHD outdoors, in good light and while panning.  The footage I have seen which accompanies the reviews seem to be shot in low light, on tripod (no panning) and with subjects lacking in lots of fine detail.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is one that came out a while back (shot in overcast light)

and another shot outdoors in bright light with some camera movement. I was surprised at the absence of shimmering in the grilles of the cars

My own experience has been that the camera produces an incredible amount of detail and nice color, but yes, you have to be careful around patterned objects

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been shooting stills with this little beauty for 2 months now (I haven't tried video recording yet, as I use my GH3 for that purpose) and all I can say is that it surely punches about its weight! Probably I haven't learnt any new tricks or techniques that I didn't know before, but it has broaden my photographic habits in a much wider sense: for being with me at all times, unnoticed in my handbag, I have been able to shoot in situations where I had not been able to shoot before, and that has been a huge improvement for me.

Read my review and see plenty of images at my blog! http://gonzalobroto.blogspot.com/2014/02/gm1-me-review-of-how-we-met-each-other.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Up until the other day, I'd been shooting everything with the GH3 and GM1 in Standard profile. But since watching some grading tutorials and picking up a pack of LUTs, I realized I was going to have to change styles. I popped the 12-32mm lens on the GM1 and took a couple of shots at the Saigon Central Post Office, a great place for people watching, and the light is beautiful in the old building. I shot at 24p, 800 ISO, Natural, -5 contrast, -3 sharpening and saturation. The clips are right out of the camera with no editing or color correction. I set focus on face recognition, which has increased the percentage of usable shots, since I mostly shoot people, You can see the lens hunting for focus in some instances. The first two shots were made at 12mm, the last at 32mm, all wide open. The lens is sharp as a tack in the center from widest aperture, and it probably wouldn't hurt to turn down the in-camera sharpening another notch or two for a more cinematic look. The color is also remarkable. If you look at the grey baby carriage behind the woman in the last shot, you'll have an idea of the noise the camera produces. For that reason, I'm going to be picking up Red Giant's denoiser soon. You can download the files here: https://copy.com/s2TZBYlMuKmu

 

Edit: I purchased Neat Video this evening

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I set focus on face recognition, which has increased the percentage of usable shots, since I mostly shoot people, You can see the lens hunting for focus in some instances.


Try manually focusing you camera. It's a skill that people who use cameras, especially for motion pictures, should have.

You want cinematic images? Think about how you use the camera. Tell it what to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try manually focusing you camera. It's a skill that people who use cameras, especially for motion pictures, should have.

You want cinematic images? Think about how you use the camera. Tell it what to do.

@Fuzzynormal Now I realize that. I've been a little scared, because I'm afraid I won't be able to focus fast enough before the moment is gone. I think I'm going to have to pick up an external monitor or something next... On the other hand, I'll be much more conspicuous... I've been told to pick up a Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 to start with, along with any cheap adaptor. I suppose I'll start looking for one next month. Do you think I'll also need to pick up a follow focus? If so, is there one you can recommend? This is beginning to be an expensive hobby!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Fuzzynormal Now I realize that. I've been a little scared, because I'm afraid I won't be able to focus fast enough before the moment is gone. I think I'm going to have to pick up an external monitor or something next... On the other hand, I'll be much more conspicuous... I've been told to pick up a Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 to start with, along with any cheap adaptor. I suppose I'll start looking for one next month. Do you think I'll also need to pick up a follow focus? If so, is there one you can recommend? This is beginning to be an expensive hobby!

It's a matter of practice and patience. You shouldn't need a monitor or follow focus to develop the skill of manual focusing- these are tools that can be very helpful to people who have already developed an eye for nailing focus, but can easily become a crutch for those who haven't yet learned how.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been told to pick up a Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 to start with, along with any cheap adaptor. I suppose I'll start looking for one next month. Do you think I'll also need to pick up a follow focus?


I just did a shoot today with a Nikon 24mm f2.8. No extra stuff, just went and got the shots. Grabbing focus isn't hard once you're used to doing it. Do it awhile and you'll be better and faster than any sensor algorithm.

Not to mention: When you're manual focusing, you can do stuff creatively that a computer would never do.

Don't be fearful, just do it. You HAVE to get good at it to be a successful motion picture shooter, so might as well start ASAP.

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just did a shoot today with a Nikon 24mm f2.8. No extra stuff, just went and got the shots. Grabbing focus isn't hard once you're used to doing it. Do it awhile and you'll be better and faster than any sensor algorithm.

Not to mention: When you're manual focusing, you can do stuff creatively that a computer would never do.

Don't be fearful, just do it. You HAVE to get good at it to be a successful motion picture shooter, so might as well start ASAP.

Good luck!

Thanks fuzzy normal. I'm definitely going to pick up some manual lenses in the near future. I was very disappointed today though when I discovered that there is no focus assist on the GH3 when actually shooting video, so I'm pretty sure I'll need a monitor or EVF. Anyhow, I think we got off topic here somehow... Sorry, all!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure I'll need a monitor or EVF.

 

Use the GH3's built in EVF.  Learn how to utilize the camera's "punch in" to assist focus.  Also, range-hunt for focusing.  As mentioned, once you develop the skill, you'll be fine.  I don't think you don't need the extra gak unless you're in a (semi)pro environment and focus is mission critical to every shot.  

 

If you're one of those types of guys that wants to have all the extra stuff loaded into your kit, rails, matte box, shoulder rig, follow focus, etc, well, go for it...although it begs the question why anyone doing all that would want a GM1...

 

Anyway, on the GM1 Lumix, I've set up the camera to auto-punch-in every time I manually adjust focus. (when using m43 lenses)  Nice little assist function allows for great initial focusing.  I've been shooting doc footage with it for a few months now and haven't missed focus yet; with m43 or manual Nikon lenses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been a little scared, because I'm afraid I won't be able to focus fast enough before the moment is gone. I think I'm going to have to pick up an external monitor or something next... On the other hand, I'll be much more conspicuous... I've been told to pick up a Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 to start with, along with any cheap adaptor. I suppose I'll start looking for one next month. Do you think I'll also need to pick up a follow focus? If so, is there one you can recommend? This is beginning to be an expensive hobby!

 

I'd say forget about the extra gear and rigs for now, and forget about the 50mm, too. For now. Instead, start with a proper wideangle prime.

In mFT terms, that would be something between 7 and 12mm. A 50mm Nikkor without Speedbooster would be an equivalent of 100mm tele, which would quadruple your focusing woes. 

 

But a good wideangle lens will be much more forgiving with both focusing and camera movement. Sometimes you don't even have to focus the lens during shooting, as long as you prefocus it for your shot and anticipate the action within the focus range of the lens. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

start with a proper wideangle prime. In mFT terms, that would be something between 7 and 12mm.

 

This is indeed good advice, but I do think an old cheap 24mm prime on a m43 camera would also be a decent lens to train one's skill.  I'm partial to that "standard" 50mm focal length.  Versatile.

 

I have a nice collection of m43 primes, but find that I go back to my Nikkor 24mm most often.  Again, personal preference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And here's an excellent review of the GM1 from a still shooter's perspective, along with some beautiful images. The only inconsistency I see in the review is he blasted the UI on the GH3 and says that of the GM1 is very good. But the reason I find the GM1 so easy to use is that the menu is nearly identical to the GH3... hmmm

 

http://blog.mingthein.com/2014/03/07/review-panasonic-lumix-gm1/#more-8208

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...