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Aputure: the Blackmagic of lighting


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15 hours ago, tupp said:

Certainly, if one's shoot takes a short time, then batteries can work.  However, lots of shoots take all day (especially narrative work) and battery power is not practical in such situations.  Of course, a lot of work (especially narrative) requires the versatility and control that tungsten fixtures offer, LED fixtures are not practical.  The thing is, tungsten fixtures can work in most all situations.  Tungsten can sometimes generate noticeable heat, but the versatility usually outweighs that potential problem.

So a light with 2 v-lock batteries for all day isn't practical? I think it's heaven... Have you ever used a generator? Ain't fun!

15 hours ago, tupp said:

You hide cables?  The only time I ever hid cables was when they were in the shot, but that was just basic dressing.  Gloves are usually not necessary, unless one is perhaps removing scrims or wrangling a hot Fresnel with some problem.

Yep, if you use a light with a cable as a backlight (eg), you always have to make sure that cable doesn't appear in the shot. "Basic dressing" in my experience consumes way to much time. No cable, no problem.

At all profesional sets I've ever been to, gloves are a must with tungsten lights (you know, the good old "safety always first" thing), but safety is optional I guess.

15 hours ago, tupp said:

Again, LEDs also have less control, less versatility and a lower power-luminance density, when compared to tungsten units.

Less control/ versatility? I think an Aputure 120T is as versatile as it gets... a small 1,5K dimmable hard light, on which you can mount soft boxes, barn doors, a beauty disc, you name it...

Lower power-luminance density? I don't even know what that is, but I can tell you that a 120W LED is really bright, and very power efficient to boot.

15 hours ago, tupp said:

You stationed someone at the fusebox?  Really?  Generators are almost never necessary for fixtures of 2k or less.

Yep, and we stack the snack table next to it, we call him the snacky-fuse guy. You don't use one? How unprofessional!

You talking indoors, aren't you? Do you ever shoot outdoors? What do you do then?

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Hey Jonesy! Ted here from Aputure. Didn't get a chance to meet you at the show, but really glad that Jeremy could show you all the new tech. Thanks for the write-up and love. It really means a ton to

So my original plan here was to use the sunlight from the window as a key, and the 120t as a fill. Unfortunately it started raining so I had to use the 120t as the key, and use a white board as the fi

I am currently using 2 Aputure 672s lights on lightweight 10' stands with 43" shoot-through umbrellas mounted for SERIOUS run-and-gun stuff... I mean like we have from 10-minutes to maybe 30-minutes t

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7 hours ago, Ted from Aputure said:

Hey Jonesy! Ted here from Aputure. Didn't get a chance to meet you at the show, but really glad that Jeremy could show you all the new tech. Thanks for the write-up and love. It really means a ton to us. 

Yah, the pleasure's all mine. I wanted to introduce myself to you but you had a lot of video interviews. :)  You guys deserve the attention. Great products.

7 hours ago, Ted from Aputure said:

If you don't already know about it, we're got a user group on facebook-- not unlike Black Magic ;) -- where we collect feedback and discuss Aputure stuff.

Yep. Jeremy told me about it and I joined last week.

7 hours ago, Ted from Aputure said:

I want to start up a live-stream once a week where we can all discuss what you guys are looking for so we can keep making it. 

Awesome idea. If you guys continue to connect with your users in such a personal way you are going to grow in a big way. We love you guys. Thanks for the great products and for supporting filmmakers. 

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On 4/24/2016 at 11:30 PM, Ted from Aputure said:

Hey Jonesy! Ted here from Aputure. Didn't get a chance to meet you at the show, but really glad that Jeremy could show you all the new tech. Thanks for the write-up and love. It really means a ton to us. 

If you don't already know about it, we're got a user group on facebook-- not unlike Black Magic ;) -- where we collect feedback and discuss Aputure stuff. I want to start up a live-stream once a week where we can all discuss what you guys are looking for so we can keep making it. 

Cheers,
Ted

Whoa !!!

You guys are seriously path-breaking in figuring out what customers really want, instead of giving people things things they may not need, or the specifications may not be quite there.

Keep up the good work 

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Interesting. I think the lightstorm could be a great replacement of the standard-issue kino-quads and knockoofs, the 4-tube biax flos that have lit a million interviews. The 672 is wildly popular, but it's a lame key. Just not enough oomph, but fantastic for doing the things you used to rely on a 3" 300 fresnel for. Backlight, hair & cheekbones, picking out bits of background. And you can pack 4  or 5 of 'em in the space of one or two 300's. (But then we have a generation of raised-on-DSLR kids who can't imagine shooting at anything but F1.8… I really prefer about F4 - 5.6 for interviews myself).

I had a chuckle over the "tungsten is the best" posts. I always assume those are guys who can't afford new lights. I have a TON of tungsten stuff and it's great for music vids or narrative (night interiors) or beauty. Sucks for corporate gigs though. LED, flo, and HMI is how you do that these days. I took a 650 fresnel to a CEO interview gig for - who knows why?? The whole time I was like "what was I thinking?" and I was totally packed and the damn thing was still too hot to touch. I could have used one of my HID 150 fresnels and heated up the room a lot less and had more control. But I have a soft spot for those tungsten fixtures I guess. But if you can't make a "middle aged lady" look lovely with a biax quad and some diffusion and some skill - I'd say go back to being a grip and watch and learn.

The quad biax has been a mainstay for me for hundreds of interviews (unless the guy has the corner office with all the windows, where a 575 HMI par will barely cut it). There are a lot of kids and newbies buying into the whole "LEDs are the future" thing, but we're just now getting to where an affordable LED panel will outrun a quad biax (and a quad knockoff is under 200 bucks now and will last for years without a hiccup - it's packing them that's a pain)… but for three times the money? I dunno. "KIds today" comes to mind! (Unless they're trust fund kids and can buy a pile of lightstorms!)

 

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On 4/24/2016 at 1:39 PM, John Emery said:

So a light with 2 v-lock batteries for all day isn't practical? I think it's heaven... Have you ever used a generator? Ain't fun!

A production day is often 12 hours.  Even if your batteries last that long, how do you manage 5 to 8 battery-powered lights, any one of which could go dead in the middle of a take?

 

Yes.  I have used generators many times.  Everything from the smallest Honda putt-putt to 1500 amps.  However, I have used "house" power countless times, and that situation is always preferred on small and medium shoots.

 

I ALWAYS prefer house power instead of batteries.  Much easier to manage.

 

 

On 4/24/2016 at 1:39 PM, John Emery said:

Yep, if you use a light with a cable as a backlight (eg), you always have to make sure that cable doesn't appear in the shot. "Basic dressing" in my experience consumes way to much time. No cable, no problem.

How do you position/mount your heavy, battery-weighted backlight so that you do not see it in the frame?  If the backlight is on a stand (extra top-heavy with a battery) on one side of the frame, there is no need to dress the cable with a tungsten light, as the light and stand are already out of the frame.

 

If your are mounting your backlight on a ceiling pick-point, the extra weight of the battery requires an extra-heavy-duty mounting and more secure "safety."  Plus, how do you easily manage that battery capacity when it is mounted on the ceiling?

 

 

On 4/24/2016 at 1:39 PM, John Emery said:

At all profesional sets I've ever been to, gloves are a must with tungsten lights (you know, the good old "safety always first" thing), but safety is optional I guess.

I was an IA electrician and grip for several years.  Please feel free to educate me on set safety and on dealing with hot lights.

 

Gloves are mainly needed for changing scrims and for problem lights.  There exist portable tungsten lights that feature large, cool handles, and such fixtures rarely require gloves.  The last two shoots I did were all tungsten, and neither I nor the swings used gloves (nor belts).

 

 

On 4/24/2016 at 1:39 PM, John Emery said:

Less control/ versatility? I think an Aputure 120T is as versatile as it gets... a small 1,5K dimmable hard light, on which you can mount soft boxes, barn doors, a beauty disc, you name it...

Certainly, the 120T's ability to accept Bowens front-end attachments makes it exceptionally versatile.  However, it isn't as if there aren't already long-established tungsten lights that share front-end accessories with other manufacturers.  Plus, the lack of luminance density makes typical LEDs not suitable for a lot of situations.  I also wonder about the actual focus range of the 120T.

 

In regards to the "1.5K" output, I am waiting for @Ted_from_Aputure to post proper photometrics on the 120T.  If the brightness is typical of most prosumer LEDs, then the output of the 120T combined with some of those accessories might be a little weak.

 

 

On 4/24/2016 at 1:39 PM, John Emery said:

Lower power-luminance density? I don't even know what that is, but I can tell you that a 120W LED is really bright, and very power efficient to boot.

Power/luminance density is basically how much "oomph" a fixture has per cubic inch.  In other words, "output-per-size (or output-per-pound)."  Tungsten fixtures often have more output-per-size and/or output-per-pound compared to LEDs.

 

Yes, LEDs are more efficient than tungsten sources.  However, the versatility, ease of use, focus range and, especially, "oomph" are more important factors to me.

 

In regards to efficiency, LEP (plasma) fixtures are more efficient than LEDs.  I have followed plasma technology for over 20 years, since it was off-color, sulfur based and unwieldy.  It is very possible that once the price of the plasma fixtures drop, that they will be the next "flavor-of-the-month" and everybody will flock to them.  Even so, tungsten will likely still be the less expensive and more versatile way to go.

 

 

On 4/24/2016 at 1:39 PM, John Emery said:

Yep, and we stack the snack table next to it, we call him the snacky-fuse guy. You don't use one? How unprofessional!

That's a real funny joke, but I have worked on tungsten sets for longer than I care to tell, and not once was anyone "stationed" at a breaker/fuse box.

 

We often "scout" the breaker box (and sometimes do tie-ins).  On medium-sized shoots, the person who scouts the breaker box is usually called the "gaffer."  On large shoots, the person who scouts the breaker box is often called the "best boy."  On small shoots, I am the one who scouts the breaker box.

 

 

On 4/24/2016 at 1:39 PM, John Emery said:

You talking indoors, aren't you? Do you ever shoot outdoors? What do you do then?

Daytime exteriors are usually "grip" days, unless you are using big guns.  Medium-sized night time exteriors can usually be handled with 1k to 2k sources.

 

Keep in mind, you're probably not going to be lighting a whole night time forest with your battery-powered LED panels.  You also might have trouble covering a 30'x30' exterior area with distant "moonlight" using a typical LED fixture.

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8 hours ago, tupp said:

A production day is often 12 hours.  Even if your batteries last that long, how do you manage 5 to 8 battery-powered lights, any one of which could go dead in the middle of a take?

 

Yes.  I have used generators many times.  Everything from the smallest Honda putt-putt to 1500 amps.  However, I have used "house" power countless times, and that situation is always preferred on small and medium shoots.

 

I ALWAYS prefer house power instead of batteries.  Much easier to manage.

 

 

How do you position/mount your heavy, battery-weighted backlight so that you do not see it in the frame?  If the backlight is on a stand (extra top-heavy with a battery) on one side of the frame, there is no need to dress the cable with a tungsten light, as the light and stand are already out of the frame.

 

If your are mounting your backlight on a ceiling pick-point, the extra weight of the battery requires an extra-heavy-duty mounting and more secure "safety."  Plus, how do you easily manage that battery capacity when it is mounted on the ceiling?

 

 

I was an IA electrician and grip for several years.  Please feel free to educate me on set safety and on dealing with hot lights.

 

Gloves are mainly needed for changing scrims and for problem lights.  There exist portable tungsten lights that feature large, cool handles, and such fixtures rarely require gloves.  The last two shoots I did were all tungsten, and neither I nor the swings used gloves (nor belts).

 

 

Certainly, the 120T's ability to accept Bowens front-end attachments makes it exceptionally versatile.  However, it isn't as if there aren't already long-established tungsten lights that share front-end accessories with other manufacturers.  Plus, the lack of luminance density makes typical LEDs not suitable for a lot of situations.  I also wonder about the actual focus range of the 120T.

 

In regards to the "1.5K" output, I am waiting for @Ted_from_Aputure to post proper photometrics on the 120T.  If the brightness is typical of most prosumer LEDs, then the output of the 120T combined with some of those accessories might be a little weak.

 

 

Power/luminance density is basically how much "oomph" a fixture has per cubic inch.  In other words, "output-per-size (or output-per-pound)."  Tungsten fixtures often have more output-per-size and/or output-per-pound compared to LEDs.

 

Yes, LEDs are more efficient than tungsten sources.  However, the versatility, ease of use, focus range and, especially, "oomph" are more important factors to me.

 

In regards to efficiency, LEP (plasma) fixtures are more efficient than LEDs.  I have followed plasma technology for over 20 years, since it was off-color, sulfur based and unwieldy.  It is very possible that once the price of the plasma fixtures drop, that they will be the next "flavor-of-the-month" and everybody will flock to them.  Even so, tungsten will likely still be the less expensive and more versatile way to go.

 

 

That's a real funny joke, but I have worked on tungsten sets for longer than I care to tell, and not once was anyone "stationed" at a breaker/fuse box.

 

We often "scout" the breaker box (and sometimes do tie-ins).  On medium-sized shoots, the person who scouts the breaker box is usually called the "gaffer."  On large shoots, the person who scouts the breaker box is often called the "best boy."  On small shoots, I am the one who scouts the breaker box.

 

 

Daytime exteriors are usually "grip" days, unless you are using big guns.  Medium-sized night time exteriors can usually be handled with 1k to 2k sources.

 

Keep in mind, you're probably not going to be lighting a whole night time forest with your battery-powered LED panels.  You also might have trouble covering a 30'x30' exterior area with distant "moonlight" using a typical LED fixture.

I'm sort of enjoying the chat, but it doesn't really seem to be heading anywhere, and I prefer investing my time doing something more productive... You love your tungsten lights? Great! Give August McCue your recommendation for a "basic kit", but keep in mind he might want to shoot outdoors too (I personally shoot 60% indoors/ 40% outdoors), so include things like generators and so, and it would be great if you also let us know how you work around issues like recording audio with them. It looks like you know your stuff, so I honestly think something like that would be a lot more interesting for this blog.

I'll just repeat my opinion... and this is coming from someone that's got way more experience with tungsten lights than LEDs:

The days of... hiding cables/ endless sauna sessions/ wearing gloves all the time (I love my fingers)/ having someone at the fusebox (No Tupp, this was just a joke... some people will get it)/ using generators... are over. Yes, I'll still use tungsten lights when they're needed (the best lights for the job thing), but I'll slowly replace them all if I can, and after all the movement we've seen this NAB it looks like the industry will too.

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9 hours ago, John Emery said:

...having someone at the fusebox (No Tupp, this was just a joke... some people will get it)...

Been there, done that, and with corporate offices it's a nightmare. I'd revise that to the days of "making sure you have every fixture plugged into a power strip with a working 15 amp breaker", which can save a lot of pain (though you gotta do the math for your strips and also make sure they're not tripping at 10, or aren't actually tripping at all…)

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Sorry about the late response guys, it's been a pretty insane week following up NAB. I'll have photometrics for the COB120t lights soon. Seems like there is never enough hours in the day. 

Photometrics are posted here on the second page. Keep in mind that beam-angle is one of the biggest factors in measuring photometrics. Most LED fresnels focus in all of their output into a single point then measure. This is open-face measurements at a fully-flooded angle. Rest assured, we and plenty of other people online will do luminance comparison tests--especially when the light comes out. COB120tSpecs.pdf 

COB120tSpecs.pdf

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On 4/24/2016 at 6:00 AM, Ted from Aputure said:

If you don't already know about it, we're got a user group on facebook-- not unlike Black Magic ;) -- where we collect feedback and discuss Aputure stuff. I want to start up a live-stream once a week where we can all discuss what you guys are looking for so we can keep making it. 

Having a link there would've been handy ;-) So here we go:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/AputureUsers/

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13 hours ago, Ted from Aputure said:

Sorry about the late response guys, it's been a pretty insane week following up NAB. I'll have photometrics for the COB120t lights soon. Seems like there is never enough hours in the day. 

Photometrics are posted here on the second page. Keep in mind that beam-angle is one of the biggest factors in measuring photometrics. Most LED fresnels focus in all of their output into a single point then measure. This is open-face measurements at a fully-flooded angle. Rest assured, we and plenty of other people online will do luminance comparison tests--especially when the light comes out. COB120tSpecs.pdf 

COB120tSpecs.pdf

Is that Aputure softbox going to be released at the same time?

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15 hours ago, Ted from Aputure said:

Sorry about the late response guys, it's been a pretty insane week following up NAB. I'll have photometrics for the COB120t lights soon.

Thank you for taking the time to provide the PDF.

 

15 hours ago, Ted from Aputure said:

Photometrics are posted here on the second page. Keep in mind that beam-angle is one of the biggest factors in measuring photometrics. Most LED fresnels focus in all of their output into a single point then measure. This is open-face measurements at a fully-flooded angle. Rest assured, we and plenty of other people online will do luminance comparison tests--especially when the light comes out. COB120tSpecs.pdf

Indeed, the beam angle measurement is crucial to assessing overall output of a light source.  As I have mentioned earlier in this thread, a proper beam angle measurement delineates the edge of the beam at 50% (one stop down) from the brightest part of the beam.  Some manufacturers additionally include beam angles delineated at 10% of the brightest part of the beam, but that figure is usually intended to give an idea of the amount of spill outside of the main part of the beam (delineated by the 50% figure).  Less scrupulous manufacturers provide only this 10%-delineated beam angle, without the 50%-delineated figure, which is exceptionally misleading.

 

I looked at the spec sheet, and I honestly have to say that I have never in all my years seen a photometric of "Brightness (average)."  So, the "average" output at 2 meters is 610 lux (57 fc) seems very weak, but what does it mean by "average?"  It can't involve an average between the flood and spot settings, if, as you say, the reading(s) was taken when the fixture was fully flooded.  I am afraid that this "average" figure is vague and not very useful in assessing the output of the 120T.  When you get a chance, please provide proper photometrics on this fixture.


You have stated on videos that the 120T has an equivalent output of a 1500-watt tungsten fixture and someone in this very thread has suggested that the 120T is equivalent to a redhead (1k tungsten) and a blonde (2k tungsten).  Until these claims can be verified with proper photometric readings, it would probably be best to cease in making them.

 

I look forward to reviewing the proper photometrics on this fixture.

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38 minutes ago, tupp said:

You have stated on videos that the 120T has an equivalent output of a 1500-watt tungsten fixture and someone in this very thread has suggested that the 120T is equivalent to a redhead (1k tungsten) and a blonde (2k tungsten).  Until these claims can be verified with proper photometric readings, it would probably be best to cease in making them.

So if it's 1K equivalent then you're out?

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5 hours ago, tupp said:

You have stated on videos that the 120T has an equivalent output of a 1500-watt tungsten fixture and someone in this very thread has suggested that the 120T is equivalent to a redhead (1k tungsten) and a blonde (2k tungsten).  Until these claims can be verified with proper photometric readings, it would probably be best to cease in making them.

 I said "LEDs like the 120T" meaning LEDs in the 120W range. I obviously haven't tested a 120T nor had I seen the specs at that time. It does look very underpowered for a 120W LED. My 72W LED panel puts out 8000 lux at 1m, and the tiny Aputure AL-H198 is around 1000 lux at 1m. Aputure stated the 120T is in the 1500W (tungsten equivalent) range, and yet it turns out it's rated at 2500 lux at 1m. On their site they have this to say about the LS1:

"Light Storm LS 1s appears with about 30000lux in half a meter(1.64ft, which is almost equal to a traditional 1000W tungsten." Here's the LS1 specs-

Q0XXORE.jpg

For comparison these are the specs for the Ledgo LG100FA-

No6ZJBy.jpg

Oh and thanks a lot for the effort to make me look disingenuous @tupp. Much appreciated.

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7 hours ago, AaronChicago said:

So if it's 1K equivalent then you're out?

Not sure what that question means.  Is it some sort of personal attack?  Why would anyone be "out" or "in."

 

What if it's not equivalent to 1.5K tungsten -- would that make someone else "out?"

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9 hours ago, tupp said:

Thank you for taking the time to provide the PDF.

 

Indeed, the beam angle measurement is crucial to assessing overall output of a light source.  As I have mentioned earlier in this thread, a proper beam angle measurement delineates the edge of the beam at 50% (one stop down) from the brightest part of the beam.  Some manufacturers additionally include beam angles delineated at 10% of the brightest part of the beam, but that figure is usually intended to give an idea of the amount of spill outside of the main part of the beam (delineated by the 50% figure).  Less scrupulous manufacturers provide only this 10%-delineated beam angle, without the 50%-delineated figure, which is exceptionally misleading.

 

I looked at the spec sheet, and I honestly have to say that I have never in all my years seen a photometric of "Brightness (average)."  So, the "average" output at 2 meters is 610 lux (57 fc) seems very weak, but what does it mean by "average?"  It can't involve an average between the flood and spot settings, if, as you say, the reading(s) was taken when the fixture was fully flooded.  I am afraid that this "average" figure is vague and not very useful in assessing the output of the 120T.  When you get a chance, please provide proper photometrics on this fixture.


You have stated on videos that the 120T has an equivalent output of a 1500-watt tungsten fixture and someone in this very thread has suggested that the 120T is equivalent to a redhead (1k tungsten) and a blonde (2k tungsten).  Until these claims can be verified with proper photometric readings, it would probably be best to cease in making them.

 

I look forward to reviewing the proper photometrics on this fixture.

Hey tupp--the best I can say is just to come visit us at at a local convention or see for yourself when the light comes out. Cinegear would be a great time to stop by with your meter! 

Cheers,

Ted

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5 hours ago, squig said:

 I said "LEDs like the 120T" meaning LEDs in the 120W range. I obviously haven't tested a 120T nor had I seen the specs at that time.

Okay.  Just curious -- did you originate the reference to a redhead and blonde, or did someone else say that?

 

 

5 hours ago, squig said:

 My 72W LED panel puts out 8000 lux at 1m,

That sounds like less than 1/3 the output of a 1K, Mole Mickey (or a 1K Lowel DP-light) at full flood.  With a Mickey at full spot, the brightness of that LED panel is probably fractional compared to that of a Mickey (and of a DP-light).

 

 

5 hours ago, squig said:

 the tiny Aputure AL-H198 is around 1000 lux at 1m.

Certainly, something that small and inexpensive has a unique utility.  However, keep in mind that a small 200W Lowel Pro-Light at full flood has around twice the rated brightness of the AL-H198, with a lot more coverage/output.  With a Pro-light at full spot, that AL-H198 brightness is fractional.

 

 

5 hours ago, squig said:

 Aputure stated the 120T is in the 1500W (tungsten equivalent) range, and yet it turns out it's rated at 2500 lux at 1m.

Actually, there currently is no way for us to assess the output of the 120T, as no one but Aputure knows the meaning of that "brightness average" figure.

 

As I have stated before in this thread, it is common/proper to give a light reading(s) along with the beam angle delineated by where it drops to 50% of its brightest point -- that the only useful way to present photometrics.  Some manufacturers avoid giving this simple, straightforward measurement, because the actual output of their fixture is disappointing.

 

5 hours ago, squig said:

On their site they have this to say about the LS1:  "Light Storm LS 1s appears with about 30000lux in half a meter(1.64ft, which is almost equal to a traditional 1000W tungsten." Here's the LS1 specs-

A light reading at 1/2 meter is not particularly useful, but we can use more distant readings from the LS1 chart that you provided to make some sort of comparison.  We don't actually know how Aputure is delineating the beam angle, so we really can't assess the overall output of the LS1.  If they are using the 10% beam angle delineation method, than the figures will make the fixture seem like it has a lot more punch than it actually puts out.  Also, it is interesting how the chart seems to show the beam angle varying with the given distances.

 

 

The 3 meter (9.84 feet) reading on that chart shows 120fc with a rated beam diameter of 1.6 meters (5.25 feet) and a beam angle of 25 degrees.   At a slightly longer distance of 10 feet, the 1k Mole Mickey is rated at 1220fc with a beam diameter of 3 feet (0.91 meters).  That Mickey footcandle rating from a slightly longer distance is over 10 times greater than that of  LS1!  Now, we would need to flood out the Mickey slightly for its beam diameter to more closely match that of the LS1, but no doubt the Mickey's brightness will still be many times the brightness of the LS1 after that adjustment.

 

 

We can also compare the 1k Lowel DP.  That fixture is rated at 711fc at 3 meters, with a 20 degree beam angle.  That beam angle will give about a slightly larger beam diameter than 1 meter, so we will back off of the flood setting a little less than we did for the Mickey.  Starting with 711fc, the DP-light must still be at least a couple of stops brighter than the 120fc of the LS1.

 

 

So, the notion that the LS1 has a brightness "which is almost equal to a traditional 1000W tungsten" is false.

 

 

Furthermore, note that we are actually comparing brightness (and rated beam angles) -- not total output.  Total output requires the beam angle to be properly delineated.  Mole-Richardson and Lowel use the 50% method, but Aputure might use a method that isn't as stringent.  Apututre doesn't state the beam angle delineation method with that photometric chart.

 

 

Here are the Mickey and DP-light photometric charts with their beam angle delineation statements.  These are solid charts with nothing squirrely.

 

Mole Mickey:

mickey_photomet.png    

 

Lowel DP-light:

dp_photomet.png

 

 

5 hours ago, squig said:

 Oh and thanks a lot for the effort to make me look disingenuous @tupp. Much appreciated.

I did not intend to make you look disingenuous (and I don't think that I did so).

 

 

There are some manufacturers who enjoy a bit of a reality distortion field, and folks occasionally get a little over-enthused and sometimes parrot what they read/hear from a company's marketing.  I figured that is what happened with your statement about the redhead/blonde.

 

 

By the way, thanks for the personal dig!:

On 4/24/2016 at 10:20 PM, squig said:

You're living the past mate..

 

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1 hour ago, Ted from Aputure said:

Hey tupp--the best I can say is just to come visit us at at a local convention or see for yourself when the light comes out. Cinegear would be a great time to stop by with your meter!

Thank you, but you must realize that it is sort of necessary to have an open, isolated space to properly take such readings, and that there would be too much spill and interfering clutter in/amongst trade show booths.  Of course, such an undertaking would be especially useless if you have one of the Cinegear outdoor booths.

 

So, Aputure is not providing a photometric chart for the 120T?

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1 hour ago, tupp said:

Thank you, but you must realize that it is sort of necessary to have an open, isolated space to properly take such readings, and that there would be too much spill and interfering clutter in/amongst trade show booths.  Of course, such an undertaking would be especially useless if you have one of the Cinegear outdoor booths.

 

So, Aputure is not providing a photometric chart for the 120T?

Hi Tupp,

The light isn't out yet or released yet. These shows are just to show what we've been working on and what is still coming out. We'll have full photometric charts once the light is released at the end of May. Not really here to argue with you. We hold to what we say about our lights and I can assure you that the 120T will be no different. 

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3 minutes ago, Ted from Aputure said:

Hi Tupp,

The light isn't out yet or released yet. These shows are just to show what we've been working on and what is still coming out. We'll have full photometric charts once the light is released at the end of May. Feel free to take a look at the luminance numbers on the Light Storm LS1S lights though. We hold to what we say about our lights and I can assure you that the 120T will be no different. 

Okay.  I look forward to those charts.

 

Thanks.

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