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fuzzynormal

Semi-Pro SoCal Colorists

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So, I need a hand in grading my 30-minute doc.  I'd really like to hire someone with serious skills in coloring, but outside of the "biz," because I can't afford those types of rates...although I CAN afford to compensate reasonably.  Very indy, you know?  I've dabbled, but I tend to end up making stuff look somewhat ridiculous rather than polished, so I really need to rectify this issue.

Also, I'd love to watch the process and ask dumb-ass questions along the way so I can glean some knowledge.

I'm not sure if this sort of thing is an appropriate request, but it doesn't hurt to ask, so I'm asking.  And if this should be posted elsewhere, let me know.  

Are you self-taught and really good at coloring your own stuff, but would like to make some U.S. dolores showing an idiot how it's done on his short film?  Or, do you have a friend that's talented and is looking for a gig?  If so, I'd love to hear from you. 

Or...heck, even some advice would be appreciated...

 

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EOSHD Pro Color for Sony cameras EOSHD Pro LOG for Sony CamerasEOSHD C-LOG and Film Profiles for All Canon DSLRs

You might be surprised from approaching an established post company or a professional colorist directly. Sometimes at post houses people get trained up on Baselight or Resolve by taking on lower budget/ indy projects to get more real-world project experience. No harm in asking nicely, you may get lucky.

I've seen it work before, some post companies are grateful if they can use it as a test project in their down time for a trainee or if it is an uncommon file format/camera for them to usually expect, sometimes it is good for them to test. I worked on a project a few years back where Technicolor did the Di for free, simply because they wanted to test how far lowlight 5Dmk2 footage could be manipulated (or not).

Pretty hilarious that a virtually zero budget short film could put 'color by Technicolor' on it's credits. 

A quality grade is almost as important as getting a good sound mix IMHO. There are some great looking films online that people can do in their bedroom now with a free version of Resolve, but very few will be using correctly calibrated monitors or have properly learnt the craft.

If they had, they'd be working in the 'biz' already.

Just my two cents.

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i have a friend who used to work for sony who might be interested i have no idea but i could ask him. a bit more info about your project would help if youd like me to do so

what was your doc shot on? whats your vision of the grade? etc.

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Thanks for the feedback.  We made a sweet very straightforward little film where the theme is the importance of friendship against a society's measures of success.  So, in my mind, I believe it deserves a sentimental color palette in warmer hues.  Here's the blurb:

"An aspiring housewife living in the heart of Japan creates an international English language publication. After three decades struggling against cultural, creative, and family challenges, her and the staff must then reckon with what it means to be successful."

If you or your colleague would like to see a draft and get an idea how the footage looks, I can send along a link.  Let me know if you're intrigued and I will definitely  follow-up.  We shot the film on Panasonic Lumix cams, the GM1 and Gx7, for whatever that's worth.

And if anyone else is interested, regardless if you're "pro" or not, I'd love to hear from you.

There are some great looking films online that people can do in their bedroom now with a free version of Resolve, but very few will be using correctly calibrated monitors or have properly learnt the craft.

Indeed.  Some people can paint even though they've never had formal training.  Since that's not me, I do need some 'learn-by-example' sessions (in a bedroom or studio, I don't care)  And anyone's that's good at it, that's fine by me.

Thanks all!

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what was your doc shot on?

Even though it was shot on consumer grade gear, it was exposed pretty decently.  I'd like to do a color grade on Resolve --as that's the software I'd like to upgrade to next year, but I'm not particular.  More interested in collaborating with people with talent than anything else.

Thanks!

some post companies are grateful if they can use it as a test project in their down time for a trainee or if it is an uncommon file format/camera for them to usually expect, sometimes it is good for them to test.

Well, that would be perfectly wonderful for someone like me.  Since it was shot with a camera that shares the same sensor as a GH4, I wonder if that would generate any interest?

Any suggestions on a practical way to initiate a process like that?

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You could cut together a short 'taster' or sample scene that is a good representation of the film as a whole, then upload to vimeo with password link. Then use that (along with covering email) to contact whoever you want.

For what it's worth, here are some things I've learn't over the years from working freelance in post production, and from friends who are resident at well known vfx/post facilities. These are just general thoughts on low/no budget work, maybe something of use in there somewhere...

Generally, if approaching professional colorist or any post house about low/no budget work - they appreciate 100% honesty when considering any indy projects. Many people in post (especially colourists and visual effects artists) are creatives at heart. 

In my experience the words 'Low budget' or 'Zero budget' should never be the opening sentence when approaching most creative people, professional or not. It instantly creates an impression of low quality and the expectations of your project to be as equally low. It especially sends a cold chill down most facility owners spine when asking them to provide a service to you that they'ed normally charge hundreds of dollars per hour for.

Instead it is better to be totally upfront early on about not having very much (or any) money, but for that to not be the focus of getting a 'freebie' service, but rather a pitch for a collaboration. it is that term 'collaboration' that is likely to get you noticed from anyone, regardless of how jaded by the business they may have become. If you can get other people excited about your project and how good you know it can be, people start to take notice.

If it's self-funded film,tell them that - If it is a passion project...even better. What they don't need to know though are the names of all the beautiful people who already gave up their time for free and that they should somehow be 'expected' to follow .The amount of bullshit stories and promises people in post hear about possibly getting a deferred payment from distribution and dreamy plans to do the festival circuit etc etc.These things may well be true, but they deal with clients everyday who are always trying to screw them over hollow promises. Always best to keep it straight and honest. 

The simple fact of the matter is, if you have an interesting project that someone likes - and they have the time, there is a good chance people will be willing to help. Become a magnet of enthusiasm, that always attracts the best creative people for collaboration, professional or not.

All the top facilities and artists out there are always going to be busy, but sometimes they have a drop in workload or have a trainee that would benefit from having a project to refine their skills on. Sometimes the bigger post houses are quite open to that idea, if it fits into their schedule.

The best thing to do is contact and then visit a few post facilities and talk to someone face to face (post production manager or equiv). If they can't help directly, ask them for advice. It is often incredible how helpful people can be, if you ask nicely and you take donuts with you.

As the saying goes ' If you don't ask, you don't get'.

 

 

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