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SHOOTING AND FOOTAGE

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Screening room and the creative side of filmmaking - share your videos / ideas / stories and scripts.

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  1. Shooting Car Scenes

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  2. Mobile shooting

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  3. Another animated thing..

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  4. Gh4 GH5s 4k log ProRes LT

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  5. G85 IBIS Performace

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  6. Olympus 25/1.2 Review

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EOSHD C-LOG and Film Profiles for All Canon DSLRs
EOSHD Pro Color 3.0 for Sony cameras
EOSHD Pro LOG for Sony cameras
EOSHD 5D Mark III 3.5K RAW Shooter's Guide


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    • I was trying it when it was late beta. The core functionality worked well at that time, it was playing BMCC 2,5K raws on average quad-core CPU an 760-770 nVidia cards, debayering quality was good and after some digging I was able to dial the look I wanted to get. The interface was clumsy to a degree - panel management was painful sometimes, some sliders were off scale so it was hard to set proper values. But it wasn't too unbearable or irritating. The main show stopper for me was it's inability to efficiently save results to ProRes/DNxHD for proxy edits. It was technically possible to stream Processors' image output to ffmpeg but the encoding speed was slow. So at the end it wasn't faster than Resolve at this task, and Resolve had much better media management and overall functionality. Besides Resolve is more universal as transcoder, it's able to work with Canon, RED and ARRI raw files. I'll try to test current version if I have time. But I think they targeted narrow niche and missed some time: CUDA and Win only, no fast proxies, limited input formats support, Resolve is quite a beast now, hardware is much more powerful than 3-4 years ago. But if you shoot a lot with BM cameras mostly it may fit your needs really well, why not?
    • My unboxing (welll... random ramble really!) of the Sound Devices 833 is now online:  
    • Panasonic GH3. More than good enough. I use a GH5 now for work, but I still can't bring myself to sell the GH3 (not that anyone would buy it). Great HD, battery life still solid, built like a tank. Paired with my Voigtlander 25mm (itself battered and scratched to shit) it has a special voodoo.  
    • I shoot in difficult situations and demand a lot from a camera in terms of DR and ability to recover things and push it around in post.  My strategy is to buy the camera that covers my needs and shootings style best and just make do.  Every camera will always be a compromise in some way, so you just have to choose which things you compromise.
    • @leslie @noone are you guys talking about colour charts to use to calibrate the video out of your cameras, or monitor calibration to get colour accuracy of your monitors, or both? Not sure if this helps, but the advice I'm hearing from the professional colourists is to calibrate your monitors, and then to just process the footage to look good ("if it looks good it is good" as they say).  However, these guys are colourists, so they're pretty good at making the image look however they want, so have less need of a colour chart to do the work for them. If I was looking to buy a colour checker to auto-correct my footage then I'd consider buying the one that Resolve uses to auto-magic the shots in the colour tab, but that's probably the one that's much more expensive! 
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